surf

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

1680s, perhaps from earlier suffe (c. 1590). Unknown, possibly related to sough, or possibly of Indo-Aryan origin, as the word was formerly a reference to the coast of India. The verb is from 1917.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

surf (countable and uncountable, plural surfs)

  1. Waves that break on an ocean shoreline.
    • 1881–1882, Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island, London; Paris: Cassell & Company, published 14 November 1883, OCLC 702939134:
      [] perhaps it was the look of the island, with its gray, melancholy woods, and wild stone spires, and the surf that we could both see and hear foaming and thundering on the steep beach []
    • 1898, J. Meade Falkner, chapter 5, in Moonfleet, London; Toronto, Ont.: Jonathan Cape, published 1934:
      'But when the surf fell enough for the boats to get ashore, and Greening held a lantern for me to jump down into the passage, after we had got the side out of the tomb, the first thing the light fell on at the bottom was a white face turned skyward.
    • 1900, Grinnell, Joseph, Birds of the Kotzebue Sound Region, Alaska[1], page 12:
      It was alone, nervously alighting and flying short distances along the surf.
    • 1941, Raymond Russell Camp, Fishing the Surf[2], page 248:
      In most instances the inshore holes or pockets along the surf do not produce as well as the cuts or sloughs between sand bars.
    • 1963, Evanoff, Vlad, Spin Fishing[3], page 181:
      Snook are found in rivers, canals, inlets and along the surf, especially around sand bars, tidal rips, jetties, bridges and piers.
  2. An instance or session of riding a surfboard in the surf.
    We went for a surf this morning.
  3. A dance popular in the 1960s in which the movements of a surfboard rider are mimicked.
    • 1964 July 15, The Australian, Sydney, page 20, column 3:
      She [...] loves to cook, sew and dance. She's up on all the latest steps like the frug, the hully-gully and the surf.
  4. (UK, dialect) The bottom of a drain.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

surf (third-person singular simple present surfs, present participle surfing, simple past and past participle surfed)

  1. To ride a wave on a surfboard; to pursue or take part in the sport of surfing.
  2. To surf at a specified place.
  3. To bodysurf; to swim in the surf at a beach.
    • 1938, Norman Lindsay, Age of Consent, Sydney: Ure Smith, published 1962, page 90:
      Such diversion as Podson could extort from his isolation was soon vitiated by repetition. He surfed. He sun-baked - with discretion till his skin had peeled and given him a harder cuticle.
  4. (transitive, intransitive) To browse the Internet, television, etc.

Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Noun[edit]

surf m (uncountable)

  1. surfing

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Italian[edit]

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

Etymology[edit]

From English surf.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

surf m (invariable)

  1. (sports) surfing

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ surf in Luciano Canepari, Dizionario di Pronuncia Italiana (DiPI)

Portuguese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from English surf.

Noun[edit]

surf m (uncountable)

  1. (sports) surfing

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from English surf.

Noun[edit]

surf n (uncountable)

  1. surf

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

Etymology[edit]

From English surf.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈsuɾf/, [ˈsuɾf]
  • IPA(key): /ˈsoɾf/, [ˈsoɾf]

Noun[edit]

surf m (uncountable)

  1. surfing

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]