woo

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English wowen, woȝen, from Old English wōgian ‎(to woo, court, marry), of uncertain origin. Cognate with Scots wow ‎(to woo). Perhaps related to Old English wōg, wōh ‎(bending, crookedness), in the specific sense of "bend or incline (some)one toward oneself". If so, then derived from Proto-Germanic *wanhō ‎(a bend, angle), from Proto-Indo-European *wonk- ‎(crooked, bent), from Proto-Indo-European *wā- ‎(to bend, twist, turn); related to Old Norse ‎(corner, angle).

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

woo ‎(third-person singular simple present woos, present participle wooing, simple past and past participle wooed)

  1. (transitive) To endeavor to gain someone's support.
  2. (transitive) (often of a man) To try to persuade someone to marry oneself; to solicit in love.
    • Prior
      Each, like the Grecian artist, wooes / The image he himself has wrought.
  3. To court solicitously; to invite with importunity.
    • Milton
      Thee, chantress, oft the woods among / I woo, to hear thy even song.
    • Bryant
      I woo the wind / That still delays his coming.
Synonyms[edit]
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Etymology 2[edit]

Interjection[edit]

woo

  1. (slang) Expressing joy or mirth; woohoo, yahoo.
    "I got you a new cell phone." "Woo, that's great!"

Etymology 3[edit]

Adjective[edit]

woo ‎(comparative more woo, superlative most woo)

  1. Alternative spelling of woo woo

Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English , wēa.

Noun[edit]

woo (plural woos)

  1. torment; anguish

Synonyms[edit]

Descendants[edit]