jar

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See also: JAR, Jar, jár, and jär

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

An ancient Greek amphora, a type of jar (sense 1)[n 1]
A large jar (sense 1) used for burial in ancient times in Mingachevir, Azerbaijan[n 2]
Pickled vegetables in jars (sense 2) for sale in Istanbul, Turkey

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English jarre (jar), from Medieval Latin jarra,[1] or from Middle French jarre (liquid measure) (from Old French jare; modern French jarre (earthenware jar)), or from Spanish jarra, jarro (jug, pitcher; mug, stein), all from Arabic جَرَّة(jarra, earthen receptacle). The word is cognate with Italian giara (jar; crock), Occitan jarro, Portuguese jarra, jarro (jug; ewer, pitcher).[2]

The verb is derived from the noun.[3]

Noun[edit]

jar (plural jars)

  1. (originally) An earthenware container, either with two or no handles, for holding oil, water, wine, etc., or used for burial. [from late 16th c.]
    • 1848, Leigh Hunt, “Introduction. A Blue Jar from Sicily, and a Brass Jar from the ‘Arabian Nights;’ and What Came Out of Each.”, in A Jar of Honey from Mount Hybla, London: Smith, Elder, and Co., [], OCLC 817475, page 3:
      [A] certain fisherman, after throwing his nets to no purpose, and beginning to be in despair, succeeded in catching a jar of brass. [] But presently there came out of the jar a vapour, and it rose up towards the heavens, and reached along the face of the earth; and after this, the vapour reached its height, and condensed, and became compact, and waved tremulously, and became an Ufreet (evil spirit), []
    • 1914, W[illiam] M[atthew] Flinders Petrie, “The Valley Cemetery”, in Tarkhan II (British School of Archaeology in Egypt and Egyptian Research Account: Nineteenth Year, 1913; XXV), London: School of Archaeology in Egypt, University College, [] and Bernard Quaritch, [], OCLC 1000654222, page 2, column 2:
      The first view shows the body in the grave, looking southwards; the stack of offering jars lies outside of a little court for offerings which is seen beyond them. Below this is a nearer view of the grave alone. Here is skeleton is in place, an alabaster bowl lies between the face and the knees, and a slate palette over that. Five jars stand around the body.
    • 2008, Judith A. Neiswander, “Individuality and Eclectic Internationalism”, in The Cosmopolitan Interior: Liberalism and the British Home 1870–1914, New Haven, Conn.; London: Published for the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art by Yale University Press, →ISBN, page 46:
      Lucy Orrinsmith praised the charms of green glazed vases from the Aures mountains and Tunisian coarse clay and terracotta jars.
  2. A small, approximately cylindrical container, normally made of clay or glass, for holding fruit, preserves, etc., or for ornamental purposes.
    Synonyms: cruse, pot
    • 1855, “On Physics, or Natural Philosophy. No. LIX. Effects Produced by the Accumulation of both Electricities.”, in [Robert Wallace], editor, The Popular Educator, volume VI, London: John Cassell, [], OCLC 752665963, page 507, column 1:
      The Leyden jar is charged, like the condenser of Œpinus and the fulminating square, by making one of the armatures communicate with the earth and the other with the electric source.
    • 1865 March 14, G. K. Geyelin, “The Laws of Nature: In Relation to Poultry Keeping from a Commercial Point of View”, in George W. Johnson and Robert Hogg, editor, The Journal of Horticulture, Cottage Gardener, and Country Gentleman. [], volume VIII, number 207 (New Series; volume XXXIII, issue 859 (Old Series)), London: Published for the proprietors, [], OCLC 612968803, page 219, column 2:
      These important deficiencies in air-tight jars for preserving eggs have led me to invent a jar purposely for egg preserving, and which jar is not only perfectly air-tight, but it will show at a glance whether it is so, and how long it remains so, by means of its patent pneumatic self-indicating cap.
  3. A jar and its contents; as much as fills such a container; a jarful.
    • 1911 November 21, William A[rthur] Bone, “Surface Combustion in a Boiler”, in Power: Devoted to the Generation and Transmission of Power, volume 34, number 21, New York, N.Y.: Hill Publishing Co., OCLC 664595205, page 767, column 3:
      A smaller plate was immersed, while the combustion was in active operation, in a glass jar of carbonic acid gas without any diminution of the incandescence of its surface, showing that the combustion is independent of the atmosphere in which takes place.
    • 2010 July 27, Christina Perri (lyrics and music), “Jar of Hearts”, in Lovestrong:
      Who do you think you are? / Runnin' 'round leaving scars / Collecting your jar of hearts / And tearing love apart
Hyponyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

jar (third-person singular simple present jars, present participle jarring, simple past and past participle jarred)

  1. (transitive) To preserve (food) in a jar.
    Synonyms: bottle, can
    • 2014, Bridget Heos, “Getting Started”, in Jarring and Canning: Make Your Own Jams, Jellies, Pickles, and More (Urban Gardening and Farming for Teens), New York, N.Y.: Rosen Publishing, →ISBN, page 17:
      It's important to consider the safety of jarring food. Eating food that has been spoiled because it wasn't jarred properly correctly can result in the disease botulism.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Perhaps imitative;[4] the noun is derived from the verb.[5]

Noun[edit]

jar (countable and uncountable, plural jars)

  1. (countable) A clashing or discordant set of sounds, particularly with a quivering or vibrating quality.
  2. (countable, also figuratively) A quivering or vibrating movement or sensation resulting from something being shaken or struck.
    Synonym: jolt
    • 1852 March – 1853 September, Charles Dickens, “Closing In”, in Bleak House, London: Bradbury and Evans, [], published 1853, OCLC 999756093, page 468:
      Through the stir and motion of the commoner streets; through the roar and jar of many vehicles, many feet, many voices; with the blazing shop-lights lighting him on, the west wind blowing him on, and the crowd pressing him on; he is pitilessly urged upon his way, and nothing meets him, murmuring, "Don't go home!"
  3. (countable, by extension) A sense of alarm or dismay.
  4. (countable, now rare) A disagreement, a dispute, a quarrel; (uncountable) contention, discord; quarrelling.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Qveene. [], London: Printed [by John Wolfe] for VVilliam Ponsonbie, OCLC 960102938, book II, canto II, stanza 26, page 212:
      So loue does raine / In ſtouteſt minds, and maketh monſtrous warre; / He maketh warre, he maketh peace againe, / And yett his peace is but continuall iarre: / O miſerable men, that to him ſubject arre.
    • 1593, [William Shakespeare], Venvs and Adonis, London: Imprinted by Richard Field, [], OCLC 837166078, [verse 17]; 2nd edition, London: Imprinted by Richard Field, [], 1594, OCLC 701755207, lines [97–100]:
      I haue beene wooed, as I intreat thee now, / Euen by the ſterne, and direfull God of warre, / VVhoſe ſinowie necke in battel nere did bow, / VVho conquers where he comes in euery iarre; []
    • 1624, Richard Pots; William Tankard; G. P.; William Simons, compiler, “Chapter XII. The Arrivall of the Third Supply.”, in John Smith, The Generall Historie of Virginia, New-England, and the Summer Isles: [], London: Printed by I[ohn] D[awson] and I[ohn] H[aviland] for Michael Sparkes, OCLC 1049014009, book 3; reprinted in The Generall Historie of Virginia, [...] (Bibliotheca Americana), Cleveland, Oh.: The World Publishing Company, 1966, OCLC 633956660, page 89:
      To redreſſe thoſe jarres and ill proceedings, the Treaſurer, Councell, and Company of Virginia, not finding that returne, and profit they expected; and them ingaged there, not having meanes to ſubſiſt of themſelues, made meanes to his Maieſtie, to call in their Commiſſion, []
    • 1718, [Daniel Defoe], A Vindication of the Press: Or, An Essay on the Usefulness of Writing, on Criticism, and the Qualification of Authors. [], London: Printed for T. Warner, [], OCLC 41479594, page 7:
      But of late the populace of France are not so perfectly enclouded with Superſtition, and if a young Author can pretend to Divine, I think it is eaſy to foreſee that the papal Power will in a very ſhort ſpace be conſiderably leſſen’d if not in a great meaſure diſregarded in that Kingdom, by the inteſtine Jarrs and Diſcords of their Parties for Religion, and the Deſultory Judgments of the moſt conſiderable Prelates.

Verb[edit]

jar (third-person singular simple present jars, present participle jarring, simple past and past participle jarred)

  1. (transitive) To knock, shake, or strike sharply, especially causing a quivering or vibrating movement.
    He hit it with a hammer, hoping he could jar it loose.
    • 1850 April 24, “Discussion on Railway Axes, and on the Structural Changes which Iron is Supposed to Undergo from Vibration and Concussion. []”, in J[oseph] C[linton] Robertson, editor, The Mechanics’ Magazine, Museum, Register, Journal, and Gazette, volume LII, number 1397, London: Robertson and Co., Mechanics’ Magazine Office, [], published 18 May 1850, OCLC 270569833, page 394, column 1:
      [T]he wrought iron arms of a fly-wheel were jarred loose in the cast iron rim, and broke off quite short from the rapid and continued violent shocks caused by the cam striking the helve, although the iron was of the toughest description originally.
    • 1868, W[illiam] Saunders, “[Appendix to Report of the Commissioner of Agriculture and Arts. Appendix (G). Report of ‘the Fruit Growers Association of Ontario,’ with Local Reports Annexed.] Report on the Fruit Crop in the Vicinity of London during 1868, with Remarks on Their Insect Enemies and Diseases”, in Sessional Papers. Second Session of the First Parliament of the Province of Ontario., volume I, part II, Toronto, Ont.: Hunter, Rose & Co. printers, OCLC 977196513, page 199:
      The most reliable process [for removing curculios] is that of jarring the trees and collecting the insects on a cotton sheet spread under the tree. [] [I]n this manner a dozen or more of trees can be jarred and the results carefully collected in about fifteen or twenty minutes.
  2. (transitive) To harm or injure by such action.
  3. (transitive, figuratively) To shock or surprise.
    I think the accident jarred him, as he hasn’t got back in a car since.
  4. (transitive, figuratively) To act in disagreement or opposition, to clash, to be at odds with; to interfere; to dispute, to quarrel.
  5. (transitive, intransitive) To (cause something to) give forth a rudely tremulous or quivering sound; to (cause something to) sound discordantly or harshly.
    The clashing notes jarred on my ears.
    • 1591, William Shakespeare, “The Second Part of Henry the Sixt, []”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act II, scene i], page 126, column 1:
      How irkſome is this Muſick to my heart? / When ſuch Strings iarre, what hope of Harmony?
    • a. 1686, Wentworth Earl of Roscommon [i.e., Wentworth Dillon, 4th Earl of Roscommon], “Horace’s Art of Poetry”, in The Poetical Works of Wentworth Earl of Roscommon [], Edinburgh: Printed by Mundell and Son, [], published 1793, OCLC 702557422; republished as Robert Anderson, editor, The Works of the British Poets. [], volume VI, London: Printed for John & Arthur Arch; and for Bell & Bradfute, and J. Mundell & Co. Edinburgh, 1795, OCLC 221535929, page 438, column 2:
      Be not too rigidly cenſorious, / A ſtring may jar in the beſt maſter's hand, / And the moſt ſkilful archer miſs his aim; / But in a poem elegantly writ, / I would not quarrel with a ſlight miſtake, / Such as our nature's frailty may excuſe; []
  6. (intransitive) To quiver or vibrate due to being shaken or struck.
  7. (intransitive, figuratively) Of the appearance, form, style, etc., of people and things: to look strangely different; to stand out awkwardly from its surroundings; to be incongruent.
Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ From the collection of the Cincinnati Art Museum in Cincinnati, Ohio, USA.
  2. ^ From the collection of the National Museum of History of Azerbaijan in Baku, Azerbaijan.

References[edit]

  1. ^ jarre, n.” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 24 October 2018.
  2. ^ jar, n.2”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1900.
  3. ^ jar, v.2”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1976.
  4. ^ jar, v.1”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1900.
  5. ^ jar, n.1”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1900.

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Blagar[edit]

Noun[edit]

jar

  1. water

References[edit]


North Frisian[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

jar

  1. them
  2. their

Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *jērą, from Proto-Indo-European *yeh₁-.

Noun[edit]

jār n

  1. year

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • jār”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old Frisian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

from Proto-Germanic *jērą (year)

Noun[edit]

jār n

  1. year

Inflection[edit]

References[edit]

  1. Köbler, Gerhard, Altfriesisches Wörterbuch, (6. Auflage) 2014

Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *jērą, from Proto-Indo-European *yeh₁-.

Noun[edit]

jār n

  1. year

Descendants[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *jērą, from Proto-Indo-European *yeh₁-.

Noun[edit]

jār n

  1. year

Declension[edit]



Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

jar m inan

  1. (archaic) spring (season)
Declension[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

jar m inan

  1. (geography) ravine, canyon
Declension[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • jar in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From a Common Slavic žarŭ, from Proto-Slavic *žarъ.

Noun[edit]

jar n (plural jaruri)

  1. burning coals
  2. intense heat, fire, glow

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *jarъ, from Proto-Indo-European *yeh₂ros, from *yeh₁r-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

jȃr m (Cyrillic spelling ја̑р)

  1. (archaic, Croatia) spring
  2. swelter, intense heat (also figuratively)

Quotations[edit]


Slovak[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *jarъ/*jaro, from Proto-Indo-European *yeh₂ros, from *yeh₁r-. Cognate with Serbo-Croatian јар/jar, dialectal Bulgarian and Russian яра (jara). Non-Slavic cognates include Gothic 𐌾𐌴𐍂 (jēr, year).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

jar f (genitive singular jari, nominative plural jari, genitive plural jarí, declension pattern of kosť)

  1. spring (season)

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • jar in Slovak dictionaries at korpus.sk

Somali[edit]

Verb[edit]

jar

  1. to cut

Tz'utujil[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Article[edit]

jar

  1. the