jar

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See also: JAR, Jar, jár, and jär

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

An ancient Greek amphora, a type of jar (sense 1)[n 1]
A large jar (sense 1) used for burial in ancient times in Mingachevir, Azerbaijan[n 2]
Pickled vegetables in jars (sense 2) for sale in Istanbul, Turkey

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English jarre (jar), from Medieval Latin jarra,[1] or from Middle French jarre (liquid measure) (from Old French jare; modern French jarre (earthenware jar)), or from Spanish jarra, jarro (jug, pitcher; mug, stein), all from Arabic جَرَّة (jarra, earthen receptacle). The word is cognate with Italian giara (jar; crock), Occitan jarro, Portuguese jarra, jarro (jug; ewer, pitcher).[2]

The verb is derived from the noun.[3]

Noun[edit]

jar (plural jars)

  1. (originally) An earthenware container, either with two or no handles, for holding oil, water, wine, etc., or used for burial. [from late 16th c.]
  2. A small, approximately cylindrical container, normally made of clay or glass, for holding fruit, preserves, etc., or for ornamental purposes.
    Synonyms: cruse, pot
  3. A jar and its contents; as much as fills such a container; a jarful.
Hyponyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

jar (third-person singular simple present jars, present participle jarring, simple past and past participle jarred)

  1. (transitive) To preserve (food) in a jar.
    Synonym: bottle
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Perhaps imitative;[4] the noun is derived from the verb.[5]

Noun[edit]

jar (countable and uncountable, plural jars)

  1. (countable) A clashing or discordant set of sounds, particularly with a quivering or vibrating quality.
  2. (countable, also figuratively) A quivering or vibrating movement or sensation resulting from something being shaken or struck.
    Synonym: jolt
  3. (countable, by extension) A sense of alarm or dismay.
  4. (countable, now rare) A disagreement, a dispute, a quarrel; (uncountable) contention, discord; quarrelling.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, London: William Ponsonbie, 1596, Book 2, Canto 2, p. 212,[1] [2]
      He maketh warre, he maketh peace againe,
      And yet his peace is but continuall iarre [...].
    • 1593, William Shakespeare, Venus and Adonis,[3]
      I have been woo’d, as I entreat thee now,
      Even by the stern and direful god of war,
      Whose sinewy neck in battle ne’er did bow,
      Who conquers where he comes in every jar;
    • 1612, John Smith, The Generall Historie of Virginia, New-England, and the Summer Isles, London: Michael Sparkes, Book 3, Chapter 12, p. 89,[4]
      To redresse those jarres and ill proceedings, the Councell and Company of Virginia, not finding that returne, and profit they expected; and them ingaged there, not having meanes to subsist of themselues, made meanes to his Maiestie, to call in their Commission []
    • 1718, Daniel Defoe, A Vindication of the Press, London: T. Warner, p. 7,[5]
      But of late the populace of France are not so perfectly enclouded with Superstition, and if a young Author can pretend to Divine, I think it is easy to foresee that the papal Power will in a very short space be considerably lessen’d if not in a great measure disregarded in that Kingdom, by the intestine Jarrs and Discords of their Parties for Religion, and the Desultory Judgments of the most considerable Prelates.
Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

jar (third-person singular simple present jars, present participle jarring, simple past and past participle jarred)

  1. (transitive) To knock, shake, or strike sharply, especially causing a quivering or vibrating movement.
    He hit it with a hammer, hoping he could jar it loose.
  2. (transitive) To harm or injure by such action.
  3. (transitive, figuratively) To shock or surprise.
    I think the accident jarred him, as he hasn’t got back in a car since.
  4. (transitive, figuratively) To act in disagreement or opposition, to clash, to be at odds with; to interfere; to dispute, to quarrel.
  5. (transitive, intransitive) To (cause something to) give forth a rudely tremulous or quivering sound; to (cause something to) sound discordantly or harshly.
    The clashing notes jarred on my ears.
    • 1591, William Shakespeare, “The Second Part of Henry the Sixt, []”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act II, scene i], page 126, column 1:
      How irkſome is this Muſick to my heart? / When ſuch Strings iarre, what hope of Harmony?
    • 17th century, Wentworth Earl of Roscommon [i.e., Wentworth Dillon, 4th Earl of Roscommon], “Horace’s Art of Poetry”, in The Poetical Works of Wentworth Earl of Roscommon [], Edinburgh: Printed by Mundell and Son, [], published 1793, OCLC 702557422; republished as Robert Anderson, editor, The Works of the British Poets. [], volume VI, London: Printed for John & Arthur Arch; and for Bell & Bradfute, and J. Mundell & Co. Edinburgh, 1795, OCLC 221535929, page 438, column 2:
      Be not too rigidly cenſorious, / A ſtring may jar in the beſt maſter's hand, / And the moſt ſkilful archer miſs his aim; / But in a poem elegantly writ, / I would not quarrel with a ſlight miſtake, / Such as our nature's frailty may excuſe; []
  6. (intransitive) To quiver or vibrate due to being shaken or struck.
  7. (intransitive, figuratively) Of the appearance, form, style, etc., of people and things: to look strangely different; to stand out awkwardly from its surroundings; to be incongruent.

Translations[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ From the collection of the Cincinnati Art Museum in Cincinnati, Ohio, USA.
  2. ^ From the collection of the National Museum of History of Azerbaijan in Baku, Azerbaijan.

References[edit]

  1. ^ jarre, n.” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 24 October 2018.
  2. ^ jar, n.2”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1900.
  3. ^ jar, v.2”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1976.
  4. ^ jar, v.1”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1900.
  5. ^ jar, n.1”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1900.

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Blagar[edit]

Noun[edit]

jar

  1. water

References[edit]


Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *jērą, from Proto-Indo-European *yeh₁-.

Noun[edit]

jār n

  1. year

Descendants[edit]


Old Frisian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

from Proto-Germanic *jērą (year)

Noun[edit]

jār n

  1. year

Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  1. Köbler, Gerhard, Altfriesisches Wörterbuch, (6. Auflage) 2014

Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *jērą, from Proto-Indo-European *yeh₁-.

Noun[edit]

jār n

  1. year

Descendants[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *jērą, from Proto-Indo-European *yeh₁-.

Noun[edit]

jār n

  1. year

Declension[edit]



Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

jar m inan

  1. (geography) ravine, canyon
  2. (archaic) spring (season)

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • jar in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From a Common Slavic žarŭ, from Proto-Slavic *žarъ.

Noun[edit]

jar n (plural jaruri)

  1. burning coals
  2. intense heat, fire, glow

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *jarъ, from Proto-Indo-European *yeh₂ros, from *yeh₁r-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

jȃr m (Cyrillic spelling ја̑р)

  1. (archaic, Croatia) spring
  2. swelter, intense heat (also figuratively)

Quotations[edit]


Slovak[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *jarъ/*jaro, from Proto-Indo-European *yeh₂ros, from *yeh₁r-. Cognate with Serbo-Croatian јар/jar, dialectal Bulgarian and Russian яра (jara). Non-Slavic cognates include Gothic 𐌾𐌴𐍂 (jēr, year).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

jar f (genitive singular jari, nominative plural jari, genitive plural jarí, declension pattern of kosť)

  1. spring (season)

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • jar in Slovak dictionaries at korpus.sk

Somali[edit]

Verb[edit]

jar

  1. to cut

Tz'utujil[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Article[edit]

jar

  1. the