vibrate

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin vibrātus, perfect passive participle of vibrō (agitate, set in tremulous motion), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *weyp- (to oscillate, swing) or *weyb-.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /vaɪˈbɹeɪt/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈvaɪ.bɹeɪt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪt

Verb[edit]

vibrate (third-person singular simple present vibrates, present participle vibrating, simple past and past participle vibrated)

  1. (intransitive) To shake with small, rapid movements to and fro.
    • 1837, Letitia Elizabeth Landon, Ethel Churchill, volume 2, page 5:
      When "God save the King!" resounded through the stately abbey, the banners vibrating with the mighty music, I felt quite enthusiastic in my loyalty.
  2. (intransitive) To resonate.
    Her mind was vibrating with excitement.
  3. (transitive) To brandish; to swing to and fro.
    to vibrate a sword or a staff
  4. (transitive) To mark or measure by moving to and fro.
    a pendulum vibrating seconds
  5. (transitive) To affect with vibratory motion; to set in vibration.
  6. (transitive, slang, dated) To please or impress someone.
    • 1949, Ladies' Home Journal (volume 66, page 115)
      And if he wants to give you high praise, he'll answer, "That vibrates me"; "That has a large charge"; or "That's oogley."
    • 1961, Congressional Record
      [] standing side by side under a Grecian column, tapping their feet in unison and saying such things as "Hot-diggety,” “Razz-ma-tazz," “That vibrates me," and other expressions of praise current in their youth.
  7. (intransitive, music) To use vibrato.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

vibrate (uncountable)

  1. The setting, on a portable electronic device, that causes it to vibrate rather than sound any (or most) needed alarms.
    Please put your cellphones on vibrate for the duration of the meeting.

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Verb[edit]

vibrate

  1. inflection of vibrare:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative

Etymology 2[edit]

Participle[edit]

vibrate f pl

  1. feminine plural of vibrato

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

vibrāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of vibrō