wine

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See also: Wine, WINE, winę, and Wîne

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
A glass of red wine

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English wyn, win, from Old English wīn, from Proto-West Germanic *wīn, from Proto-Germanic *wīną, either directly or via Latin vīnum (from Proto-Italic *wīnom) from Proto-Indo-European *wóyh₁nom (wine). Doublet of vine and vino.

Noun[edit]

wine (countable and uncountable, plural wines)

  1. An alcoholic beverage made by fermenting grape juice, with an ABV ranging from 5.5–16%.
    Wine is usually stronger than beer.
    "Wine improves with age but I improve with wine," she slurred as she slid gracefully beneath the table.
  2. An alcoholic beverage made by fermenting other substances, producing a similar ABV.
  3. (countable) A serving of wine.
    I'd like three beers and two wines, please. My friend will have the same.
  4. (uncountable) The color of red wine, a deep reddish purple.
    wine:  
Hyponyms[edit]
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Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

wine (third-person singular simple present wines, present participle wining, simple past and past participle wined)

  1. (transitive) To entertain (someone) with wine.
    • 1919, Lee Meriwether, The War Diary of a Diplomat, Dodd, Mead and Company, page 159:
      Neither Major Wadhams nor I is accustomed to being wined and dined by perfect strangers who do not even present themselves, but leave servants to do the honors, consequently to both of us our present situation smacks of romance and adventure;
  2. (intransitive) To drink wine.
    • 1839, Thomas Chandler Haliburton, The Clockmaker:
      I rushed into my cabin, coffeed, wined, and went to bed sobbing.
Usage notes[edit]

The homophony of wine (and wining) with whine (and whining) is sometimes a point of humor, as with would you like some cheese with your /waɪn/? or if you're going to be whining then I need to be wining.

Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

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Etymology 2[edit]

A variant of wind with simplification of the final consonant cluster; for the vowel quality, compare find, mind, rind.

Noun[edit]

wine (uncountable)

  1. (Britain dialect) Wind.
    • 1850, James Orchard Halliwell, A Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial Words, Obsolete Phrases, Proverbs, and Ancient Customs, from the Fourteenth Century:
      Vor voices rawze upon tha wine
    • 1869, James Jennings, The Dialect of the West of England, particularly Somersetshire:
      Aw how sholl I tell o’m—vor âll pirty maidens / When I pass’d ’em look’d back—ther smill rawze on tha wine.

Etymology 3[edit]

Jamaican Creole [Term?], related to wind (verb).

Verb[edit]

wine (third-person singular simple present wines, present participle wining, simple past and past participle wined)

  1. (dance, intransitive) To perform a Jamaican dance, such as the Dutty Wine.
    • 2010, Andoni Alonso, Pedro Oiarzabal, editors, Diasporas in the New Media Age: Identity, Politics, and Community[1], University of Nevada Press, →ISBN:
      Even when there are positive comments, as in the responses to “white boy wines to dancehall,” the origin of the white boy's ability to dance is attributed to skills derived from others: [] .

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English wine, from earlier wini.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

wine (plural wines or wine) (Early Middle English)

  1. friend
  2. relative
Related terms[edit]
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

wine

  1. Alternative form of wyn (wine)

Etymology 3[edit]

Verb[edit]

wine

  1. Alternative form of winnen (to win)

Etymology 4[edit]

Noun[edit]

wine

  1. Alternative form of vine (grapevine)

Middle High German[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German wini.

Noun[edit]

wine m

  1. friend

Muna[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *binəhiq, from Proto-Austronesian *binəSiq.

Noun[edit]

wine

  1. seed
    Defepili kahitela mokesano so wine.
    They are selecting maize kernels as seed.
  2. seedlings

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *wini, from Proto-Germanic *winiz, whence also Old Dutch wini, Old Saxon wini, Old High German wini, Old Norse vinr. Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *wenh₁- (to seek, desire, love, win).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

wine m

  1. (poetic) friend

Usage notes[edit]

Used as a second element of many personal names. It could be appended to mythical creatures as in Ælfwine (elf friend) and Entwine (giant friend); or animals as in Lēowine (lion friend) and Wulfwine (wolf friend); or inanimate objects as in Goldwine (gold friend) and Dunwine (hill friend); or locations as in Centwine (Kent friend); or features of nature as in Sǣwine (sea friend) and Æsċwine (ash friend); or kinds of people as in Pihtwine (Pict friend) and Bregowine (prince friend); or abstract concepts as in Ēadwine (prosperity/happiness friend) and Bōtwine (repair/penance friend). It was also often used with adjectives, usually praising the owner of the name, as in Beorhtwine (bright friend) and Ealdwine (old friend).

Declension[edit]

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Old Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *wini, from Proto-Germanic *winiz.

Noun[edit]

wine m

  1. friend
    Synonym: friūnd

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • Hofmann, Dietrich; Tjerk Popkema, Anne; co-op. Gisela Hofmann (2008) Altfriesisches Handwörterbuch [Old Frisian Concise Dictionary]‎[2] (in German), Heidelberg: Universitätsverlag Winter GmbH Heidelberg, →ISBN

Unami[edit]

Etymology[edit]

  • /win/: of snow, snowy
  • /e/: verb marker
  • /-w/: third person suffix

Verb[edit]

wine (inanimate intransitive)

  1. (inanimate, intransitive) it snows, it is snowing

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Rementer, Jim; Pearson, Bruce L. (2005), “wine”, in Leneaux, Grant; Whritenour, Raymond, editors, The Lenape Talking Dictionary, The Lenape Language Preservation Project