win

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: WIN, Win, Wīn, wiń, wɨn, -win, and .win

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English winnen, from Old English winnan (to labour, swink, toil, trouble oneself; resist, oppose, contradict; fight, strive, struggle, rage; endure) (compare Old English ġewinnan (conquer, obtain, gain; endure, bear, suffer; be ill)), from Proto-Germanic *winnaną (to swink, labour, win, gain, fight), from Proto-Indo-European *wenh₁- (to strive, wish, desire, love). Cognate with Low German winnen, Dutch winnen, German gewinnen, Norwegian Bokmål vinne, Norwegian Nynorsk and Swedish vinna.

Verb[edit]

win (third-person singular simple present wins, present participle winning, simple past and past participle won or (obsolete) wan)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To conquer, defeat.
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur, Book IV:
      For and we doo bataille we two wyl fyghte with one knyȝt at ones / and therfore yf ye wille fyghte soo we wille be redy at what houre ye wille assigne / And yf ye wynne vs in bataille the lady shal haue her landes ageyne / ye say wel sayd sir Vwayne / therfor make yow redy so that ye be here to morne in the defence of the ladyes ryght
    • 1998, Rhapsody, Emerald Sword:
      For the glory, the power to win the Black Lord, I will search for the Emerald Sword.
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To reach some destination or object, despite difficulty or toil (now usually intransitive, with preposition or locative adverb).
    • c. 17th century, unknown author, The Baron of Brackley (traditional folk song)
      I well may gang out, love, but I'll never win home.
    • 1922, Everard Wyrall, The History of the Second Division 1914-1918:
      As this position was vulnerable, a trench was immediately begun from the junction of the Green Line with Lager Alley, back to the old British front line, in order to form a defensive flank for the protection of the troops of the 5th Infantry Brigade who had won through to their objective.
    • 1953, John Craig, The Mint: A History of the London Mint from A.D. 287 to 1948:
      Parson Brooke was transferred in a couple of years to the Southwark mint, on dissolution of which he won back to the Tower, there to experiment with machinery in Mary's reign.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Qveene. [], London: [] [John Wolfe] for VVilliam Ponsonbie, OCLC 960102938, book VI, canto I, stanza 23:
      That euen in the Porch he him did win, / And cleft his head asunder to his chin
    • 1808 February 22, Walter Scott, “(please specify the introduction or canto number, or chapter name)”, in Marmion; a Tale of Flodden Field, Edinburgh: Printed by J[ames] Ballantyne and Co. for Archibald Constable and Company, []; London: William Miller, and John Murray, OCLC 270129616:
      And when the stony path began, / By which the naked peak they won, / Up flew the snowy ptarmigan.
  3. (transitive) To triumph or achieve victory in (a game, a war, etc.).
  4. (transitive) To gain (a prize) by succeeding in competition or contest.
    to win the jackpot in a lottery;  to win a bottle of wine in a raffle
  5. (transitive) To obtain (someone) by wooing; to make an ally or friend of (frequently with over).
  6. (intransitive) To achieve victory.
    Who would win in a fight between an octopus and a dolphin?
  7. (intransitive) To have power, coercion or control.
    Ever since the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing, Bostonians now run as "One Boston." The terrorists did not win.
  8. (transitive) To obtain (something desired).
    The company hopes to win an order from the government worth over 5 million dollars.
  9. (transitive) To cause a victory for someone.
    The success of the economic policies should win Mr. Smith the next elections.
    The policy success should win the elections for Mr. Smith.
  10. (transitive, mining) To extract (ore, coal, etc.).
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Raymond to this entry?)
Conjugation[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English winn, winne, from Old English winn (toil, labor, trouble, hardship; profit, gain; conflict, strife, war), from Proto-Germanic *winną (labour, struggle, fight), from Proto-Indo-European *wenh₁- (to strive, desire, wish, love). Cognate with German Gewinn (profit, gain), Dutch gewin (profit, gain).

Noun[edit]

win (plural wins)

  1. An individual victory.
    Antonym: loss
    Our first win of the season put us in high spirits.
    • 2011 September 29, Jon Smith, “Tottenham 3 - 1 Shamrock Rovers”, in BBC Sport[1]:
      Giovani dos Santos smashed home a third five minutes later to wrap up the win.
  2. (slang) A feat carried out successfully; a victorious achievement.
    Antonym: fail
  3. (obsolete) Gain; profit; income.
  4. (obsolete) Wealth; goods owned.
Translations[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English wynne, winne, wunne, from Old English wynn (joy, rapture, pleasure, delight, gladness), from Proto-West Germanic *wunnju, from Proto-Germanic *wunjō (joy, delight, pleasure, lust), from Proto-Indo-European *wenh₁- (to strive, wish, desire, love).

Cognate with German Wonne (bliss, joy, delight), archaic Dutch wonne (joy), Danish ynde (grace), Icelandic yndi (delight).

Noun[edit]

win (plural wins)

  1. (Scotland) Pleasure; joy; delight.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

From wind.

Verb[edit]

win

  1. (transitive, Scotland) To dry by exposure to the wind.

Chuukese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English win.

Noun[edit]

win

  1. win
  2. victory
  3. prize

Verb[edit]

win

  1. to win

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

win

  1. first-person singular present indicative of winnen
  2. imperative of winnen

Kis[edit]

Noun[edit]

win

  1. woman

Further reading[edit]

  • Malcolm Ross, Proto Oceanic and the Austronesian Languages of Western Melanesia, Pacific Linguistics, series C-98 (1988)
  • Stephen Adolphe Wurm, New Guinea Area Languages and Language Study (1976)

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

win (uncountable)

  1. Alternative form of wynne (happiness)

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English winn, from Proto-West Germanic *winnan, from Proto-Germanic *winną, *winnaną; akin to winnen. Reinforced by earlier iwin, from Old English ġewinn.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

win (uncountable)

  1. benefit, gain, profit
  2. (Late Middle English) wealth, riches
  3. (Early Middle English) discord, conflict, turmoil
  4. (Early Middle English, rare) exertion, work
Descendants[edit]
  • English: win
References[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Verb[edit]

win

  1. Alternative form of winnen (to win)

Etymology 4[edit]

Noun[edit]

win

  1. Alternative form of vine (grapevine)

North Frisian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Frisian wind, from Proto-Germanic *windaz.

Noun[edit]

win m

  1. (Mooring) wind

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Frisian wīn, from Proto-West Germanic *wīn, from Latin vīnum.

Noun[edit]

win m

  1. (Mooring) wine

Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *wīn, from Latin vīnum.

Noun[edit]

wīn m

  1. wine

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • wīn”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *wīn from Latin vīnum.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

wīn n

  1. wine

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

win f

  1. genitive plural of wina

Noun[edit]

win n

  1. genitive plural of wino

Tok Pisin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English wind.

Noun[edit]

win

  1. wind
    • 1989, Buk Baibel long Tok Pisin, Port Moresby: Bible Society of Papua New Guinea, 2:7:
      Bihain God, Bikpela i kisim graun na em i wokim man long en. Na em i winim win bilong laip i go insait long nus bilong man, na man i kisim laip.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

Related terms[edit]

This entry has fewer than three known examples of actual usage, the minimum considered necessary for clear attestation, and may not be reliable. Tok Pisin is subject to a special exemption for languages with limited documentation. If you speak it, please consider editing this entry or adding citations. See also Help and the Community Portal.

Torres Strait Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English wind.

Noun[edit]

win

  1. wind

Derived terms[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

win

  1. Soft mutation of gwin.

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
gwin win ngwin unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.