conquistar

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Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan [Term?] (compare Occitan conquistar), possibly from a supposed Vulgar Latin *conquisitāre, present active infinitive of *conquisitō (compare Portuguese and Spanish conquistar, Italian conquistare), from Latin conquisitus, past participle of conquīrō. It may alternatively be an old derivative of conquist, from a variant of Old Catalan conquest, the archaic past participle of conquerir[1].

Verb[edit]

conquistar (first-person singular present conquisto, past participle conquistat)

  1. to conquer
  2. to convince, to persuade

Conjugation[edit]

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Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Possibly from a Vulgar Latin *conquisitāre, present active infinitive of *conquisitō[1], from Latin conquisitus, past participle of conquīrō. Displaced Old Portuguese conquerer. It may also be analyzed as an internal derivative of the past participle of the aforementioned Old Portuguese verb, or an early Romance formation; compare the other cognates on this page.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

conquistar (first-person singular present indicative conquisto, past participle conquistado)

  1. to conquer
    1. to acquire by arms; to win in war
      Em 146 a.C., O Império Romano conquistou a Grécia
      In 146 BC, the Roman Empire conquered Greece
      Synonyms: ocupar, invadir
    2. to earn or achieve something through effort
      Conquistei meu sonho
      I made my dream real
      Synonyms: realizar, conseguir
  2. to captivate, to charm, to seduce (to attract the attention of someone)
    Ela me conquistou
    She seduced me
    Synonyms: seduzir, atrair

Conjugation[edit]

Quotations[edit]

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:conquistar.

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Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Possibly from a hypothetical Vulgar Latin *conquisitāre, present active infinitive of *conquisitō[1], from Latin conquisitus, past participle of conquirō; alternatively, it may simply be an internal formation, as a derivation of conquista, from the feminine past participle of Old Spanish conquerir, which this verb replaced over time[2].

Verb[edit]

conquistar (first-person singular present conquisto, first-person singular preterite conquisté, past participle conquistado)

  1. to conquer
  2. (figuratively) to enamor, romantically convince
  3. (figuratively) to charm (an object to a person)
    Ese carro me conquistóThat car charmed me, I like that car a lot

Conjugation[edit]

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