triumph

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Triumph

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈtɹaɪ.ʌmf/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈtɹaɪ.əmf/
  • (file)

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French triumphe, from Latin triumphus (triumphal procession), ultimately from Ancient Greek θρίαμβος (thríambos, thriambus). Doublet of thriambus.

Noun[edit]

triumph (countable and uncountable, plural triumphs)

  1. A conclusive success following an effort, conflict, or confrontation of obstacles; victory; conquest.
    the triumph of knowledge
  2. A magnificent and imposing ceremonial performed in honor of a victor.
  3. (obsolete) Any triumphal procession; a pompous exhibition; a stately show or pageant.
  4. A state of joy or exultation at success.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book 7”, in Paradise Lost. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: Printed [by Samuel Simmons], and are to be sold by Peter Parker [] [a]nd by Robert Boulter [] [a]nd Matthias Walker, [], OCLC 228722708; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: The Text Exactly Reproduced from the First Edition of 1667: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, OCLC 230729554:
      Great triumph and rejoicing was in heaven.
    • (Can we date this quote by Dryden and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Hercules from Spain / Arrived in triumph, from Geryon slain.
  5. (obsolete) A trump card.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
  6. A card game, also called trump.
  7. (historical, Ancient Rome) a ceremony held to publicly celebrate and sanctify the military achievement of an army commander.
  8. A work of art, cuisine, etc. of very high quality.
    Scorsese's latest film is a triumph.
    This wedding cake is a triumph.
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin triumphō.

Verb[edit]

triumph (third-person singular simple present triumphs, present participle triumphing, simple past and past participle triumphed)

  1. To celebrate victory with pomp; to rejoice over success; to exult in an advantage gained; to exhibit exultation.
  2. To prevail over rivals, challenges, or difficulties.
  3. To succeed, win, or attain ascendancy.
    • 1911, Thomas Babington Macaulay, “Goldsmith, Oliver”, in 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica:
      On this occasion, however, genius triumphed.
    • 2016, David Thomson, Biggest lesson of the 2016 Oscars? The Academy should be scrapped (in The Guardian, 3 March 2016)[2]
      No one reckoned in advance that he had anything but a very testing job as host. He had to be tough, brave, witty, engaging – and decent. He triumphed on every count, thanks to sheer ability.
  4. To be prosperous; to flourish.
    • (Can we date this quote by Trumbull and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      where commerce triumphed on the favouring gales
  5. To play a trump in a card game.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ben Jonson to this entry?)
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Related terms[edit]