dry

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See also: Dry and DRY

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: drī, IPA(key): /dɹaɪ/, /dʒɹaɪ/
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  • Rhymes: -aɪ

Etymology[edit]

Adjective and noun from Middle English drye, dryge, drüȝe, from Old English drȳġe (dry; parched, withered), from Proto-Germanic *drūgiz, *draugiz (dry, hard), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰerǵʰ- (to strengthen; become hard), from *dʰer- (to hold, support). Cognate with Scots dry, drey (dry), North Frisian drüg, driig, Saterland Frisian druuch (dry), West Frisian droech (dry), Dutch droog (dry), Low German dröög (dry), German dröge (dull), Icelandic draugur (a dry log). Related also to German trocken (dry), West Frisian drege (long-lasting), Danish drøj (tough), Swedish dryg (lasting, hard), Icelandic drjúgur (ample, long), Latin firmus (strong, firm, stable, durable). See also drought, drain, dree.

Verb from Old English dryġan (to dry), from drȳġe (dry).

Alternative forms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

dry (comparative drier or dryer, superlative driest or dryest)

  1. Free from or lacking moisture.
    This towel's dry. Could you wet it and cover the chicken so it doesn't go dry as it cooks?
    • {{{2}}}, Joseph Addison, The Freeloader No. {{{1}}}
      The weather, [] we [] both agreed, was too dry for the season.
    • (Can we date this quote by Prescott and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Not a dry eye was to be seen in the assembly.
  2. Unable to produce a liquid, as water, (petrochemistry) oil, or (farming) milk.
    This well is as dry as that cow.
  3. (masonry) Built without or lacking mortar.
    • 1937, J.R.R. Tolkien, The Hobbit, p. 241:
      [] already the gate was blocked with a wall of squared stones laid dry, but very thick and very high, across the opening.
  4. (chemistry) Anhydrous: free from or lacking water in any state, regardless of the presence of other liquids.
    Dry alcohol is 200 proof.
  5. (figuratively) Athirst, eager.
    • 1610–1611, William Shakespeare, “The Tempest”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act I, scene ii]:
      Prospero: [] Confederates / (ſo drie he was for Sway) with King of Naples / To giue him Annuall tribute, doe him homage / Subiect his Coronet, to his Crowne and bend / The Dukedom yet vnbow'd (alas poore Millaine) / To moſt ignoble ſtooping.
  6. Free from or lacking alcohol or alcoholic beverages.
    Of course it's a dry house. He was an alcoholic but he's been dry for almost a year now.
  7. (law) Describing an area where sales of alcoholic or strong alcoholic beverages are banned.
    You'll have to drive out of this dry county to find any liquor.
  8. Free from or lacking embellishment or sweetness, particularly:
    1. (wine and other alcoholic beverages) Low in sugar; lacking sugar; unsweetened.
      Proper martinis are made with London dry gin and dry vermouth.
    2. (humor) Amusing without showing amusement.
      Steven Wright has a deadpan delivery, Norm Macdonald has a dry sense of humor, and Oscar Wilde had a dry wit.
    3. Lacking interest, boring.
      A dry lecture may require the professor to bring a watergun in order to keep the students' attention.
    4. (fine arts) Exhibiting precise execution lacking delicate contours or soft transitions of color.
  9. (sciences, somewhat derogatory) Involving computations rather than work with biological or chemical matter.
  10. (of a sound recording) Free from applied audio effects.
  11. Without a usual complement or consummation; impotent.
    never dry fire a bow; dry humping her girlfriend; making a dry run
    • 1992, Dwight R. Schuh, Bowhunter's Encyclopedia, Stackpole Books (→ISBN), page 81:
      When you shoot a bow, the arrow absorbs a high percentage of the energy released by the limbs. If you dry fire a bow (shoot it with no arrow on the string), the bow itself absorbs all the energy, []
    • 2015, Naoko Takei Moore, Kyle Connaughton, Donabe: Classic and Modern Japanese Clay Pot Cooking, Ten Speed Press (→ISBN), page 8:
      Because some recipes require specific techniques such as high-intensity dry heating (heating while the pot is empty or heating with little or no fluid inside), read the manufacturer's instructions to ensure your vessel can handle such cooking []
    1. Of a bite from an animal: not containing the usual venom.
  12. (Christianity) Of a mass, service, or rite: involving neither consecration nor communion.

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

  • (free from liquid or moisture): See Thesaurus:wet
  • (abstinent from alcohol): wet
  • (of a scientist or lab: doing computation): wet

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Sranan Tongo: drei

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

dry (plural drys or dries)

  1. The process by which something is dried.
    This towel is still damp: I think it needs another dry.
  2. (US) A prohibitionist (of alcoholic beverages).
    • (Can we date this quote by Noah S. Sweat, Jr. and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      The drys were as unhappy with the second part of the speech as the wets were with the first half.
  3. (chiefly Australia, with "the") The dry season.
    • 1938, Xavier Herbert, Capricornia, New York: D. Appleton-Century, 1943, Chapter VII, page 91, [1]
      [] one was sodden to the bone and mildewed to the marrow and moved to pray [] for that which formerly he had cursed—the Dry! the good old Dry—when the grasses yellowed, browned, dried to tinder, burst into spontaneous flame— []
    • 2006, Alexis Wright, Carpentaria, Giramondo 2012, p. 169:
      [T]he spring-fed river systems. Not the useless little tributary jutting off into a mud hole at the end of the Dry.
  4. (Australia) An area of waterless country.
  5. (Britain, UK politics) A radical or hard-line Conservative; especially, one who supported the policies of British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher in the 1980s.
    Antonym: wet

Verb[edit]

dry (third-person singular simple present dries, present participle drying, simple past and past participle dried)

  1. (intransitive) To lose moisture.
    The clothes dried on the line.
  2. (transitive) To remove moisture from.
    Devin dried her eyes with a handkerchief.
  3. (obsolete, intransitive) To be thirsty.
    • c. 1390, William Langland, Piers Plowman, I:
      And drynke whan þow dryest · ac do nouȝt out of resoun.
  4. (transitive, figuratively) To exhaust; to cause to run dry.

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Albanian *drūna, from the same root as dru. Cognate to Sanskrit द्रुणा (druṇā, bow), Persian درونه(rainbow).[1]

Noun[edit]

dry m (indefinite plural dryna, definite singular dryni, definite plural drynat)

  1. lock, bolt

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Orel, Vladimir (1998), “dry”, in Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Leiden, Boston, Cologne: Brill, page 77

Middle English[edit]

Adjective[edit]

dry

  1. Alternative form of drye

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Brythonic language, representing Proto-Brythonic *drüw, from Proto-Celtic *druwits (druid).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

drȳ m

  1. a sorcerer or magician
    Hi woldon forbærnan ðone dry.They would burn the sorceror. (Ælfric’s Homilies, volume 1.)

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

dry

  1. Soft mutation of try.

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
try dry nhry thry
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.