sale

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Sale, salé, Salé, sāle, säle, Säle, șale, såle, and šále

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English sale, sal, from Old English sæl (room, hall, castle), from Proto-Germanic *salą (house, hall), from Proto-Indo-European *sel- (home, dwelling, village). Cognate with West Frisian seal, Dutch zaal, German Saal, Swedish sal, Icelandic salur, Lithuanian sala (village). Related also to salon, saloon.

Noun[edit]

sale (plural sales)

  1. (obsolete) A hall.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English sale, from Old English sala (act of selling, sale), from Old Norse sala (sale), from Proto-Germanic *salō (delivery), from Proto-Indo-European *selh₁- (to grab).

Noun[edit]

sale (plural sales)

  1. An exchange of goods or services for currency or credit.
    He celebrated after the sale of company.
  2. (Short for discount sale) The sale of goods at reduced prices.
    They are having a clearance sale: 50% off.
  3. The act of putting up for auction to the highest bidder.
Troponyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.
See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Noun[edit]

sale

  1. plural of saal (hall)

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle French sale, from Old French sale (dull, dirty), from Frankish *salo (dull, dirty grey), from Proto-Germanic *salwaz (dusky, dark, muddy), from Proto-Indo-European *salw-, *sal- (dirt, dirty). Cognate with Old High German salo (dull, dirty grey), Old English salu (dark, dusky), Old Norse sǫlr (yellowish). More at sallow.

Adjective[edit]

sale (plural sales)

  1. dirty
    Synonyms: crasseux, malpropre
    Hyponyms: dégoûtant, répugnant, sali, sordide, souillé, terni
    Antonyms: net, propre
  2. vile, despicable
    Un sale type(please add an English translation of this usage example)
    Synonyms: méprisable, vil
    Hyponyms: dégoûtant, répugnant, sordide
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From saler

Verb[edit]

sale

  1. first-person singular present indicative of saler
  2. third-person singular present indicative of saler
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of saler
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of saler
  5. second-person singular imperative of saler

Further reading[edit]


Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈsa.le/
  • Rhymes: -ale
  • Hyphenation: sà‧le

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin salem, accusative of sāl, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *séh₂ls.

Noun[edit]

sale m (plural sali)

  1. salt, sal
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • sale in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Noun[edit]

sale f pl

  1. plural of sala

Etymology 3[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb[edit]

sale

  1. third-person singular present indicative of salire

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

sale

  1. ablative singular of sāl

References[edit]

  • sale in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • sale in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • sale in The Perseus Project (1999) Perseus Encyclopedia[1]
  • sale in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French sale (dull, dirty), from a Germanic source, from Proto-Germanic *salwaz (dusky, dark, muddy), from Proto-Indo-European *salw-, *sal- (dirt, dirty).

Adjective[edit]

sale m or f

  1. (Jersey, Guernsey) dirty

Derived terms[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse sǫðla, from Proto-Germanic *sadulōną.

Verb[edit]

sale (present tense saler, past tense salte or salet, past participle salt or salet, present participle salende, imperative sal)

  1. (transitive) to saddle

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse sǫðla, from Proto-Germanic *sadulōną.

Verb[edit]

sale (present tense salar, past tense sala, past participle sala, passive infinitive salast, present participle salande, imperative sal)

  1. (transitive) to saddle

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Frankish *sali (dwelling, house, entrance hall)

Noun[edit]

sale f (oblique plural sales, nominative singular sale, nominative plural sales)

  1. room (subsection of a building)

Descendants[edit]

  • French : salle
  • Norman: salle

Romanian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

sale

  1. feminine plural of său
  2. neuter plural of său

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From salir. For the interjection, sale is part of a former rhyming phrase, sale y vale; see valer.

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

sale

  1. (Mexico) ok
    Synonyms: (Argentina) dale, vale

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

sale

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of salir.
  2. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of salir.

Venetian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sal, salem.

Noun[edit]

Venetian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia vec

sale f

  1. salt (sodium chloride, non-chemical usage)

sale m (plural sali)

  1. (chemistry) salt

Westrobothnian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Low German sä̂lich, older form of sêlich, from Old Saxon sālig, from Proto-West Germanic *sālīg.

Adjective[edit]

sale

  1. (Christianity) Blessed, saved.
    he han skull få vaḷ sale[so] that he would be saved