hall

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See also: Hall and häll

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English halle, from Old English heall ‎(hall, dwelling, house; palace, temple; law-court), from Proto-Germanic *hallō ‎(hall), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱel- ‎(to hide, conceal). Cognate with Scots hall, haw ‎(hall), Dutch hal ‎(hall), German Halle ‎(hall), Swedish hall ‎(hall), Icelandic höll ‎(palace), Latin cella ‎(room, cell), Sanskrit शाला ‎(śā́lā, house, mansion, hall).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hall ‎(plural halls)

  1. A corridor; a hallway.
    The drinking fountain was out in the hall.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 13, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      We tiptoed into the house, up the stairs and along the hall into the room where the Professor had been spending so much of his time.
  2. A meeting room.
    The hotel had three halls for conferences, and two were in use by the convention.
  3. A manor house (originally because a magistrate's court was held in the hall of his mansion).
    The duke lived in a great hall overlooking the sea.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Cowell to this entry?)
  4. A building providing student accommodation at a university.
    The student government hosted several social events so that students from different halls would intermingle.
  5. The principal room of a secular medieval building.
  6. (obsolete) Cleared passageway through a crowd.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *(s)kel- (compare English shallow, Middle High German hel ‎(tired, weak), Ancient Greek σκέλλω ‎(skéllō, to dry up), σκληρός ‎(sklērós, hard, harsh))[1].

Noun[edit]

hall m (indefinite plural halle, definite singular halli, definite plural hallet)

  1. trouble

References[edit]

  1. ^ Orel, Vladimir (1998), “hall”, in Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Leiden, Boston, Köln: Brill, page 141

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English hall.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hall c (singular definite hallen, plural indefinite haller)

  1. hall (a corridor or a hallway)

Inflection[edit]


Estonian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Finnic *halla, from pre-Finnic *šalna, from a Proto-Balto-Slavic [Term?] language.

Noun[edit]

hall ‎(genitive halla, partitive halla)

  1. frost
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions.

Adjective[edit]

hall ‎(genitive halli, partitive halli)

  1. grey (color)
Declension[edit]

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions.

Noun[edit]

hall ‎(genitive halli, partitive halli)

  1. hall (large room or building)
  2. corridor, hallway
Declension[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.


French[edit]

Noun[edit]

hall m ‎(plural halls)

  1. hall

External links[edit]


German[edit]

Verb[edit]

hall

  1. Imperative singular of hallen.
  2. (colloquial) First-person singular present of hallen.

Hungarian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Hungarian hadl ‎(hear), from Proto-Uralic *kontale- (compare Finnish kuunnella); compare also Proto-Uralic *kule-.

Verb[edit]

hall

  1. (intransitive) to hear (to perceive sounds through the ear)
  2. (transitive) to hear (to perceive with the ear)
    Hallottam egy hangot a szobából.‎ ― I heard a sound from the room.
Conjugation[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowing from German Halle.[1]

Noun[edit]

hall ‎(plural hallok)

  1. lounge
Declension[edit]
Inflection (plural in -ok, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative hall hallok
accusative hallt hallokat
dative hallnak halloknak
instrumental hallal hallokkal
causal-final hallért hallokért
translative hallá hallokká
terminative hallig hallokig
essive-formal hallként hallokként
essive-modal
inessive hallban hallokban
superessive hallon hallokon
adessive hallnál halloknál
illative hallba hallokba
sublative hallra hallokra
allative hallhoz hallokhoz
elative hallból hallokból
delative hallról hallokról
ablative halltól halloktól
Possessive forms of hall
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. hallom halljaim
2nd person sing. hallod halljaid
3rd person sing. hallja halljai
1st person plural hallunk halljaink
2nd person plural hallotok halljaitok
3rd person plural halljuk halljaik

References[edit]

  1. ^ Tótfalusi István, Idegenszó-tár: Idegen szavak értelmező és etimológiai szótára. Tinta Könyvkiadó, Budapest, 2005, ISBN 963 7094 20 2

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English hall.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hall m (plural halls)

  1. (architecture) lobby; entrance hall (room in a building used for entry from the outside)

Derived terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

hall m ‎(plural halls)

  1. hall, lobby, lounge

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hǫll, from Proto-Germanic *hallō, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱel-. Compare English hall. Related to Latin cella and English cellar.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hall c

  1. a lounge
  2. a corridor
  3. short for any of the words:
    1. simhall
    2. ishall
    3. sporthall
    4. verkstadshall
    5. mässhall

Declension[edit]

Inflection of hall 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative hall hallen hallar hallarna
Genitive halls hallens hallars hallarnas

References[edit]

  1. ^ hall in Elof Hellquist, Svensk etymologisk ordbok (1st ed., 1922)