sec

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Translingual[edit]

Symbol[edit]

sec

  1. (trigonometry) Symbol of the trigonometric function secant.
    Coordinate terms: csc, cot, arcsec
  2. (nonstandard) Symbol of second, an SI unit of measurement of time.

Usage notes[edit]

The standard symbol for "second" is s.


English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Abbreviation of second. From 1881.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /sɛk/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛk

Noun[edit]

sec (plural sec or secs)

  1. (colloquial) Second, 160 of a minute.
  2. (colloquial) Abbreviation of second. (A short indeterminate period of time.)
    1881 August 27, “In Church”, in Supplement to the Manchester Weekly Timees, Manchester, England, page 8:
    And the sloping of the shoulder / From the slender shapely neck / Makes you long to come behind her and to hold her /Just a sec'.
    Wait a sec!

Alternative forms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Aromanian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin siccus. Compare Romanian sec.

Alternative forms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sec

  1. dry
  2. barren, deserted

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin siccō. Compare Romanian seca, sec.

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

sec (third-person singular present seacã, past participle sicatã)

  1. I dry, dry up.
  2. I exhaust, wither, drain, empty.
Related terms[edit]

Catalan[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Occitan sec, from Latin siccus (dry), from Proto-Indo-European *seyk-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sec (feminine seca, masculine plural secs, feminine plural seques)

  1. dry (free from or lacking moisture)
    Synonym: eixut
  2. (of wine) dry (low in sugar)
  3. skinny

Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

sec

  1. first-person singular present indicative form of seure

Further reading[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French sec, from Latin siccus (dry), from Proto-Indo-European *seyk-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sec (feminine singular sèche, masculine plural secs, feminine plural sèches)

  1. dry
  2. dried, having had its moisture evaporated
    des abricots secsdried apricots
    du poisson secdried fish
  3. lean, thin, skinny
  4. (of alcohol) bitter, not sweet
  5. (of a person) harsh
    Désolé si j'ai été un peu sec.
    Sorry if I was a bit harsh.

Descendants[edit]

  • Turkish: sek

Noun[edit]

sec m (plural secs)

  1. something that is dry
    • 1883, La Bible, translated by Louis Segond, Genesis 1:9
      Que les eaux qui sont au-dessous du ciel se rassemblent en un seul lieu, et que le sec paraisse.
      Let the waters below the heavens gather in one place, and let the dry stuff (i.e. the land) come forth.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Lower Sorbian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *sěťi (to cut, chop), from Proto-Indo-European *sek- (to cut).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

sec impf (perfective pósec)

  1. to mow (cut something down)

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Arnošt Muka (1921, 1928), “sec”, in Słownik dolnoserbskeje rěcy a jeje narěcow (in German, Russian), St. Petersburg, Prague: ОРЯС РАН, ČAVU; Reprinted (in German)Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag, 2008
  • sec in Manfred Starosta (1999): Dolnoserbsko-nimski słownik / Niedersorbisch-deutsches Wörterbuch. Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag.

Old English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sēc (Anglian)

  1. Alternative form of sēoc

Declension[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin siccus.

Adjective[edit]

sec m (oblique and nominative feminine singular seiche)

  1. dry (lacking moisture)

Descendants[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin siccus, from Proto-Indo-European *seyk-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sec m or n (feminine singular seacă, plural seci)

  1. dry
  2. barren, empty, deserted; also dried up
  3. (figuratively) missing or deficient in something, lacking; also useless
  4. (figuratively) dull, stupid, empty-headed
  5. (regional, Transylvania) skinny

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin siccus.

Adjective[edit]

sec m (feminine singular secca, masculine plural secs, feminine plural seccas)

  1. (Sursilvan) dry