seco

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See also: séco, secò, and secó

Asturian[edit]

Verb[edit]

seco

  1. first-person singular present indicative of secar

Galician[edit]

Verb[edit]

seco

  1. first-person singular present indicative of secar

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Italian, from Latin secum, the only form of cum + se. (The form cum se resonated with an obscene word and was therefore shunned).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈseko/, [ˈs̪eːko]
  • Hyphenation: sé‧co

Preposition[edit]

seco

  1. (archaic, literary) with oneself
  2. (archaic, literary) along
    Portalo seco - Bring him along.

Descendants[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *sek- (to cut). Cognates include Old Church Slavonic сѣщи (sěšti, to cut, hack, chop off) and Old English saga (English saw).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

secō (present infinitive secāre, perfect active secuī, supine sectum); first conjugation

  1. I cut, cut off.
    • 405 CE, Jerome, Vulgate Exodus.29.17
      Ipsum autem arietem secabis in frustra: lotaque intestina ejus ac pedes, pones super concissas carnes, et super caput illius.
      And thou shalt cut the ram in pieces, and wash the inwards of him, and his legs, and put them unto his pieces, and unto his head.
  2. I cleave, divide.
  3. (medicine) I operate, amputate, perform surgery.
  4. I castrate.
  5. (by extension) I wound, injure.
  6. (figuratively) I hurt with my words.

Inflection[edit]

   Conjugation of seco (first conjugation)
indicative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present secō secās secat secāmus secātis secant
imperfect secābam secābās secābat secābāmus secābātis secābant
future secābō secābis secābit secābimus secābitis secābunt
perfect secuī secuistī secuit secuimus secuistis secuērunt, secuēre
pluperfect secueram secuerās secuerat secuerāmus secuerātis secuerant
future perfect secuerō secueris secuerit secuerimus secueritis secuerint
passive present secor secāris, secāre secātur secāmur secāminī secantur
imperfect secābar secābāris, secābāre secābātur secābāmur secābāminī secābantur
future secābor secāberis, secābere secābitur secābimur secābiminī secābuntur
perfect sectus + present active indicative of sum
pluperfect sectus + imperfect active indicative of sum
future perfect sectus + future active indicative of sum
subjunctive singular plural
first second third first second third
active present secem secēs secet secēmus secētis secent
imperfect secārem secārēs secāret secārēmus secārētis secārent
perfect secuerim secuerīs secuerit secuerīmus secuerītis secuerint
pluperfect secuissem secuissēs secuisset secuissēmus secuissētis secuissent
passive present secer secēris, secēre secētur secēmur secēminī secentur
imperfect secārer secārēris, secārēre secārētur secārēmur secārēminī secārentur
perfect sectus + present active subjunctive of sum
pluperfect sectus + imperfect active subjunctive of sum
imperative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present secā secāte
future secātō secātō secātōte secantō
passive present secāre secāminī
future secātor secātor secantor
non-finite forms active passive
present perfect future present perfect future
infinitives secāre secuisse sectūrus esse secārī sectus esse sectum īrī
participles secāns sectūrus sectus secandus

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Lower Sorbian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

seco

  1. third-person singular present of sec

Old Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sēcum

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈseko/
  • Hyphenation: sé‧co

Preposition[edit]

seco

  1. with oneself
  2. along

See also[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese seco, from Latin siccus, from Proto-Indo-European *seik-.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈse.ku/
  • Hyphenation: se‧co

Adjective[edit]

seco m (feminine singular seca, masculine plural secos, feminine plural secas, comparable)

  1. devoid of liquids; dry

Inflection[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin siccus.

Adjective[edit]

seco m (feminine singular seca, masculine plural secos, feminine plural secas)

  1. dry

Antonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

seco

  1. First-person singular (yo) present indicative form of secar.

Anagrams[edit]