seco

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See also: séco and secò
See also: secó

Asturian[edit]

Verb[edit]

seco

  1. first-person singular present indicative of secar

Galician[edit]

Verb[edit]

seco

  1. first-person singular present indicative of secar

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin secum, the only form of cum + se. (The form cum se resonated with an obscene word and was therefore shunned).

Preposition[edit]

seco

  1. (literary) with oneself
  2. along
    Portalo seco- Bring him along.

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *sek- (to cut). Cognates include Old Church Slavonic сѣщи (sěšti, to cut, hack, chop off) and Old English saga (English saw).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

present active secō, present infinitive secāre, perfect active secuī, supine sectum

  1. I cut, cut off.
  2. I cleave, divide.
  3. (medicine) I operate, amputate, perform surgery.
  4. I castrate.
  5. (by extension) I wound, injure.
  6. (figuratively) I hurt with my words.

Inflection[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Lower Sorbian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

seco

  1. third-person singular present of sec

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese seco, from Latin siccus, from Proto-Indo-European *seik-.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈse.ku/
  • Hyphenation: se‧co

Adjective[edit]

seco m (feminine seca plural secos feminine plural secas; comparable)

  1. Devoid of liquids; dry.

Inflection[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin siccus.

Adjective[edit]

seco m (feminine seca, masculine plural secos, feminine plural secas)

  1. dry

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

seco

  1. First-person singular (yo) present indicative form of secar.