saga

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: Saga, säga, såga, sàga, sága, saĝa, and sağa

Contents

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse saga ‎(epic tale, story), from Proto-Germanic *sagǭ ‎(saying, story), from Proto-Indo-European *sekʷe-, *skʷē- ‎(to tell, talk). Cognate with Old English sagu ‎(story, tale, statement), Old High German saga ‎(an assertion, narrative, sermon, pronouncement), Icelandic saga ‎(story, tale, history). More at saw, say.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

saga ‎(plural sagas)

  1. An Old Norse (Icelandic) prose narrative, especially one dealing with family or social histories and legends.
  2. Something with the qualities of such a saga; an epic, a long story.
    • 2011 October 1, David Ornstein, “Blackburn 0-4 Man City”, BBC Sport:
      Manchester City put the Carlos Tevez saga behind them with a classy victory at Blackburn that keeps them level on points with leaders Manchester United.
    • 2013 June 8, “Obama goes troll-hunting”, The Economist, volume 407, number 8839, page 55: 
      According to this saga of intellectual-property misanthropy, these creatures [patent trolls] roam the business world, buying up patents and then using them to demand extravagant payouts from companies they accuse of infringing them. Often, their victims pay up rather than face the costs of a legal battle.

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Balinese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *saga.

Noun[edit]

saga

  1. jequirity (Abrus precatorius)

Crimean Tatar[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse saga.

Noun[edit]

saga

  1. saga

Declension[edit]

References[edit]


Fijian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Oceanic *sanga.

Noun[edit]

saga

  1. (anatomy) thigh

Finnish[edit]

Noun[edit]

saga

  1. Alternative spelling of saaga

Declension[edit]

Inflection of saga (Kotus type 9/kala, no gradation)
nominative saga sagat
genitive sagan sagojen
partitive sagaa sagoja
illative sagaan sagoihin
singular plural
nominative saga sagat
accusative nom.? saga sagat
gen. sagan
genitive sagan sagojen
sagainrare
partitive sagaa sagoja
inessive sagassa sagoissa
elative sagasta sagoista
illative sagaan sagoihin
adessive sagalla sagoilla
ablative sagalta sagoilta
allative sagalleˣ sagoilleˣ
essive sagana sagoina
translative sagaksi sagoiksi
instructive sagoin
abessive sagatta sagoitta
comitative sagoineen

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old Norse segja ‎(to say)

Noun[edit]

saga f ‎(plural sagas)

  1. saga

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Icelandic Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia is

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From the Old Norse saga, from Proto-Germanic *sagǭ. Cognate with Old English sagu (English saw); Old Frisian sege; Old High German saga (German Sage); Old Danish saghæ, Old Swedish sagha, Faroese søga, Nynorsk soge, Jutlandic save ‎(a narrative, a narration, a tale, a report), Swedish saga. Perhaps related to Lithuanian pasaka.

Compare with segja ‎(to say, to tell) and sögn ‎(a story).

Noun[edit]

saga f ‎(genitive singular sögu, nominative plural sögur)

  1. a story
    Segðu mér sögu.
    Tell me a story.
  2. a history
    Saga Japans er mjög áhugaverð.
    The history of Japan is very interesting.
  3. a saga
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From sög ‎(saw).

Verb[edit]

saga ‎(weak verb, third-person singular past indicative sagaði, supine sagað)

  1. to saw
Conjugation[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

saga

  1. indefinite genitive plural of sög

Anagrams[edit]


Indonesian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Malay saga, from Proto-Malayic *saga, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *saga.

Noun[edit]

saga

  1. jequirity (Abrus precatorius)

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse saga.

Noun[edit]

saga f ‎(plural saghe)

  1. saga

Anagrams[edit]


Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

saga

  1. rōmaji reading of さが

Javanese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Javanese, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *saga.

Noun[edit]

saga

  1. jequirity (Abrus precatorius)

Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sāga f ‎(genitive sāgae); first declension

  1. a female sage, fortune-teller

Inflection[edit]

First declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative sāga sāgae
genitive sāgae sāgārum
dative sāgae sāgīs
accusative sāgam sāgās
ablative sāgā sāgīs
vocative sāga sāgae

Noun[edit]

saga

  1. nominative plural of sagum
  2. accusative plural of sagum
  3. vocative plural of sagum

Lithuanian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (sagà) IPA(key): [s̪ɐˈɡɐ]
  • (sãga) IPA(key): [ˈs̪ä̌ːɡɐ]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

sagà f ‎(plural sãgos) stress pattern 4 [1]

  1. button
    sagas įsiūti[1] - to sew buttons on
Declension[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse.

Noun[edit]

sagà f ‎(plural sãgos) stress pattern 2 [1]

  1. saga
  2. (in broader sense) story, legend
Declension[edit]
Synonyms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 “saga” in Juozas Balčikonis [et al.] (1954), Dabartinės lietuvių kalbos žodynas. Vilnius: Valstybinė politinės ir mokslinės literatūros leidykla.

Malay[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Malayic *saga, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *saga.

Noun[edit]

saga

  1. jequirity (Abrus precatorius)

Etymology 2[edit]

From English saga, from Old Norse saga ‎(epic tale, story), from Proto-Germanic *sagǭ ‎(saying, story), from Proto-Indo-European *sekʷe-, *skʷē- ‎(to tell, talk).

Noun[edit]

saga

  1. saga (Old Norse Icelandic prose)
  2. saga (long epic story)

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (of sag) sagen
  • (of sage) saget
  • (of sage) sagde (simple past)
  • (of sage) sagd (past participle)

Noun[edit]

saga m, f

  1. definite feminine singular of sag

Verb[edit]

saga

  1. simple past of sage
  2. past participle of sage

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Noun[edit]

saga f

  1. definite singular of sag

Old English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈsɑɡɑ/, [ˈsɑɣɑ]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *sagô ‎(saw, scythe), *sagō, from Proto-Indo-European *sek-, *sēik- ‎(to cut). Cognate with Old Frisian sage (West Frisian seage), Old Saxon saga, Middle Dutch sage, saghe (Dutch zaag), Old High German saga (German Säge), Old Norse sǫg (Icelandic sög, Danish sav, Swedish såg).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

saga m (nominative plural sagan)

  1. saw (tool)
Descendants[edit]
  • Middle English: sawe

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *sagō, *sagǭ ‎(saying, story), from Proto-Indo-European *sekʷe-, *skʷē- ‎(to tell, talk). More at saw.

Noun[edit]

saga m (nominative plural sagan)

  1. saying; statement
  2. story, tale; narrative
Declension[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

saga

  1. imperative form of secgan

Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Proto-Germanic *sagǭ. Cognate with Old English sagu, Old Norse and Icelandic saga.

Noun[edit]

saga f

  1. story

Descendants[edit]


Old Javanese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *saga.

Noun[edit]

saga

  1. jequirity (Abrus precatorius)

Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Cognate with Old English sagu, Frisian sege, Old High German saga (German Sage), Old Norse saga.

Noun[edit]

saga f

  1. statement, discourse, report

Declension[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse saga.

Noun[edit]

saga f (plural sagas)

  1. saga (Old Norse prose narrative)
  2. (by extension) saga (long, epic story)

Sasak[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *saga.

Noun[edit]

saga

  1. jequirity (Abrus precatorius)

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse saga.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /sâːɡa/
  • Hyphenation: sa‧ga

Noun[edit]

sȃga f (Cyrillic spelling са̑га)

  1. saga

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse saga.

Noun[edit]

saga f ‎(plural sagas)

  1. saga

Sundanese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *saga.

Noun[edit]

saga

  1. jequirity (Abrus precatorius)

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Swedish sagha, from Old Norse saga, from Proto-Germanic *sagǭ. Cognate with Old English sagu (English saw); Old Frisian sege; Old High German saga (German Sage); Old Danish saghæ, Faroese søga, Nynorsk soge, Jutlandic save ‎(a narrative, a narration, a tale, a report), Icelandic saga. Perhaps related to Lithuanian pasaka.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

saga c

  1. fairy tale
  2. epic, long story

Declension[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Turkish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia tr

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse saga.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

saga ‎(definite accusative sagayı, plural sagalar)

  1. Old Norse (Icelandic) saga

Declension[edit]