sag

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See also: SAG, säg, såg, sąg, and sağ

English[edit]

Wikipedia has articles on:

Wikipedia

Etymology 1[edit]

From late Middle English saggen, probably of Scandinavian/Old Norse origin (compare Norwegian sagga ‎(move slowly)); probably akin to Danish and Norwegian sakke, Swedish sacka, Icelandic sakka, Old Norse sokkva. Compare also Low German sacken, Dutch zakken.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sag ‎(plural sags)

  1. The state of sinking or bending; sagging.
  2. The difference in elevation of a wire, cable, chain or rope suspended between two consecutive points.
  3. The difference height or depth between the vertex and the rim of a curved surface, specifically used for optical elements such as a mirror or lens.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

sag ‎(third-person singular simple present sags, present participle sagging, simple past and past participle sagged)

  1. To sink, in the middle, by its weight or under applied pressure, below a horizontal line or plane.
    A line or cable supported by its ends sags, even if it is tightly drawn.
    The floor of a room sags.
  2. (by extension) To lean, give way, or settle from a vertical position.
    A building may sag one way or another.
    The door sags on its hinges.
  3. (figuratively) To lose firmness, elasticity, vigor, or a thriving state; to sink; to droop; to flag; to bend; to yield, as the mind or spirits, under the pressure of care, trouble, doubt, or the like; to be unsettled or unbalanced.
    • Shakespeare
      The mind I sway by, and the heart I bear, / Shall never sag with doubt nor shake with fear.
  4. To loiter in walking; to idle along; to drag or droop heavily.
  5. (transitive) To cause to bend or give way; to load.
  6. (informal) To wear one's trousers so that their top is well below the waist.
Quotations[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

sag ‎(uncountable)

  1. Alternative form of saag
    • 2003, Charles Campion, The Rough Guide to London Restaurants (page 173)
      The dal tarka (£5) is made from whole yellow split peas, while sag aloo (£5) brings potatoes in a rich and oily spinach puree.

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch zacht.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sag ‎(attributive sagte, comparative sagter, superlative sagste)

  1. soft

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Danish sak, from Old Norse sǫk, from Proto-Germanic *sakō. Cognate with Swedish sak, Icelandic sök, English sake, Dutch zaak, German Sache.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /saːɡ/, [sæːˀj]

Noun[edit]

sag c (singular definite sagen, plural indefinite sager)

  1. matter, business, affair, thing
  2. cause
  3. case, lawsuit
  4. file

Inflection[edit]


Faroese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse sǫg, from Proto-Germanic *sagō, from Proto-Indo-European *sek- ‎(to cut).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sag f (genitive singular sagar, plural sagir)

  1. saw; a tool with a toothed blade used for cutting hard substances, in particular wood or metal

Declension[edit]

Declension of sag
f2 singular plural
indefinite definite indefinite definite
nominative sag sagin sagir sagirnar
accusative sag sagina sagir sagirnar
dative sag sagini sagum sagunum
genitive sagar sagarinnar saga saganna

German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /zaːk/ (standard)
  • IPA(key): /zax/ (northern and central Germany; very common)
  • Rhymes: -aːk, -ax

Verb[edit]

sag

  1. Imperative singular of sagen.
  2. (colloquial) First-person singular present of sagen.

Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the verb saga ‎(to saw).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sag n ‎(genitive singular sags, no plural)

  1. sawdust

Declension[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

sag

  1. rafsi of sanga.

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia no

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse sǫg, from Proto-Germanic *sagō, from Proto-Indo-European *sek- ‎(to cut).

Noun[edit]

sag m, f ‎(definite singular saga or sagen, indefinite plural sager, definite plural sagene)

  1. (tools) a saw
  2. sawmill
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

sag

  1. imperative of sage

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nn

Noun[edit]

sag f ‎(definite singular saga, indefinite plural sager, definite plural sagene)

  1. (tools) a saw

Derived terms[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sagum.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sȃg m ‎(Cyrillic spelling са̑г)

  1. carpet, rug

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]