insensible

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English insensible, from Old French insensible, from Late Latin īnsēnsibilis.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɪnˈsɛn.sɪ.bl̩/
  • Hyphenation: in‧sen‧si‧ble

Adjective[edit]

insensible (comparative more insensible, superlative most insensible)

  1. Unable to be perceived by the senses.
    • 1650, Thomas Browne, Pseudodoxia Epidemica: [], 2nd edition, London: [] A[braham] Miller, for Edw[ard] Dod and Nath[aniel] Ekins, [], OCLC 152706203:
      Two small and almost insensible pricks were found upon Cleopatra's arm.
    • 1697, Virgil, “(please specify the book number)”, in John Dryden, transl., The Works of Virgil: Containing His Pastorals, Georgics, and Æneis. [], London: [] Jacob Tonson, [], OCLC 403869432:
      They fall away, / And languish with insensible decay.
  2. Incapable or deprived of physical sensation.
    • 1905, Baroness Emmuska Orczy, chapter 1, in The Fate of the Artemis[1]:
      “[…] Captain Markam had been found lying half-insensible, gagged and bound, on the floor of the sitting-room, his hands and feet tightly pinioned, and a woollen comforter wound closely round his mouth and neck ; whilst Mrs. Markham's jewel-case, containing valuable jewellery and the secret plans of Port Arthur, had disappeared. […]”
  3. Unable to be understood; unintelligible.
  4. Not sensible or reasonable; meaningless.
    • 1736, Matthew Hale, Historia Placitorum Coronæ
      If it make the indictment be insensible or uncertain, [] it shall be quashed.
  5. Incapable of mental feeling; indifferent.
    • 1697, Virgil, “(please specify the book number)”, in John Dryden, transl., The Works of Virgil: Containing His Pastorals, Georgics, and Æneis. [], London: [] Jacob Tonson, [], OCLC 403869432:
      Lost in their loves, insensible of shame.
    • 1813 January 27, [Jane Austen], Pride and Prejudice, volume (please specify |volume=I to III), London: [] [George Sidney] for T[homas] Egerton [], OCLC 38659585:
      In spite of her deep-rooted dislike, she could not be insensible to the compliment of such a man's affection []
  6. Incapable of emotional feeling; callous; apathetic.
    Synonym: insensitive

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French insensible, from Late Latin īnsēnsibilis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

insensible (plural insensibles)

  1. insensible
  2. impervious
  3. unperceivable, imperceptible
    Synonym: imperceptible

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin īnsēnsibilis.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /insenˈsible/, [ĩn.sẽnˈsi.β̞le]

Adjective[edit]

insensible (plural insensibles)

  1. insensible, insensitive, callous, cold, tactless
    Antonym: sensible

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]