clown

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: Clown

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Likely from North Germanic, akin to Icelandic klunni (klutz) and Old Frisian klönne (klutz). Less probable from Latin colonus (colonist, farmer), although learned awareness of this term may have influenced semantic development.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

A clown
Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

clown (plural clowns)

  1. A performance artist often associated with a circus and typically characterised by bright, oversized clothing, a red nose, face paint, and a brightly colored wig and who performs slapstick.
  2. A person who acts in a silly fashion.
  3. (chiefly Britain) A stupid person.
  4. (obsolete) A man of coarse nature and manners; an awkward fellow; an illbred person; a boor.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir Philip Sidney to this entry?)
  5. (obsolete) One who works upon the soil; a rustic; a churl; a yokel.
    • Cowper
      The clown, the child of nature, without guile.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

clown (third-person singular simple present clowns, present participle clowning, simple past and past participle clowned)

  1. (intransitive) To act in a silly or playful fashion.

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

clown m (plural clowns)

  1. clown (performer)
  2. clown (person who acts in a comic way)

Further reading[edit]


Italian[edit]

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

Noun[edit]

clown m (invariable)

  1. clown (artist)

Synonyms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English clown.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

clown m (plural clownes)

  1. clown (circus performance artist)

Synonyms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

clown c

  1. clown

Declension[edit]

Declension of clown 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative clown clownen clowner clownerna
Genitive clowns clownens clowners clownernas

Derived terms[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from English clown.

Noun[edit]

clown m (plural clowniaid)

  1. clown

Etymology 2[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • closwn (colloquial, first-person singular conditional)

Verb[edit]

clown

  1. first-person plural present / future of cloi
  2. first-person singular imperfect / conditional of cloi
  3. (literary) first-person plural imperative of cloi

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
clown glown nghlown chlown
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.