clown world

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English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

The alt-right sense emerged from The Honkler, a version of Pepe the Frog meme featuring a red clown nose and rainbow wig, characterized as honking a bicycle horn whenever liberals speak.[1] The meme is associated with the use of honk honk ("HH") as a coded reference to heil Hitler by white supremacists.[2][3]

Noun[edit]

clown world (plural clown worlds)

  1. (figuratively) A crazy world or environment.
    • 2000 October 24, ., “Chumley is a big fat idiot (part 2)”, in rec.arts.bodyart, Usenet[1], retrieved 14 January 2022:
      > negating the self centered aspect of your
      > comment, it was through the resulting disagreement that this realization was
      > able to come to fruition. In all honesty I'm exceptionally happy with how
      > things turned out and I truly hope the best for her family.

      Your crazy clown world has nothing to do with reality.
    • 2018 August 15, Christopher Othen, Soldiers of a Different God: How the Counter-Jihad Movement Created Mayhem, Murder and the Trump Presidency[2], Amberley Publishing Limited, →ISBN, OCLC 1079280454:
      The /pol/ or politically incorrect board at 4chan became an alt-right clown world.
    • 2021 August 3, Zach Vorhies, Kent Heckenlively, Google Leaks: A Whistleblower's Exposé of Big Tech Censorship[3], Simon and Schuster, →ISBN, page 64:
      The government was so top-heavy and bureaucratic that it created a circus show, a clown world where nothing worked as it was expected. It wasn't simply that there was waste and corruption everywhere. The most corrupted part of that life ...
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:clown world.
  2. (slang, derogatory, alt-right) The current, absurd state of global society, from the perspective of the alt-right movement.
    • 2020 December 10, James Nicholls, How Uk Should Be[4], Xlibris Corporation, →ISBN:
      [] instead of the young boys growing up to be feminine, weak cry babies like they are in the modern ultra-liberal clown world they live in today.
    • 2020, P. J. Vanston, Somewhere in Europe, unnumbered page:
      "Bloody idiots. But remember, this is an age when hurty feelings come above everything else, especially free speech. Sums up our stupid clownworld backward feminut times, eh?"
    • 2021, anonymous, quoted in Martin Robinson, You Are Not the Man You Are Supposed to Be: Into the Chaos of Modern Masculinity, unnumbered page:
      But he wasn't a chad. If you are not a chad you are literally an unperson in this clown world.
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:clown world.
  3. Used other than figuratively or idiomatically: see clown,‎ world.
    • 2003, Donald McManus, No Kidding!: Clown as Protagonist in Twentieth-Century Theatre, page 33:
      While he did not see these experiments as anti-textual, the most significant contribution to the clown world from the Copeau years was the development of modern French mime.
    • 2013, Jon Davison, Clown: Readings in Theatre Practice, page 29:
      This is a clown world, the openly theatrical world of the stage-clown, and not a world of masters and servants, despite the origin of the role being partly in imitation of a recognisable social type.
    • 2015, Slava Polunin, in Clowns: In Conversation with Modern Masters (eds. David Bridel & Ezra Lebank), page 49:
      He said that my essence was grotesque, that I would be a part of the clown world naturally, that I could organically belong to a circus or any other environment, because the grotesque is not limited to or contained in one genre – it has no boundaries.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Scott F. Aikin & Robert B. Talisse, Political Argument in a Polarized Age: Reason and Democratic Life, unnumbered page
  2. ^ Gabriel Weimann & Ari Ben Am, "Digital Dog Whistles: The New Online Language of Extremism", International Journal of Security Studies, Volume 2, Issue 1 (2020), page 18
  3. ^ Ashley Peckford, "Right Wing Extremism in a Video Game Community?: A Qualitative Content Analysis Exploring the Discourse of the Reddit GamerGate Community r/KotakuInAction", A Closer Look in Unusual Times: Criminological Perspectives from Crim 862, June 2020, page 73

See also[edit]