absurd

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See also: absúrd and absürd

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

First attested in 1557. From Middle French absurde, from Latin absurdus (incongruous, dissonant, out of tune),[1] from ab (away from, out) + surdus (silent, deaf, dull-sounding).[2] Compare surd.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

absurd (comparative absurder or more absurd, superlative absurdest or most absurd)

  1. Contrary to reason or propriety; obviously and flatly opposed to manifest truth; inconsistent with the plain dictates of common sense; logically contradictory; nonsensical; ridiculous; silly. [First attested in the mid 16th century.][3]
    • 1591, William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part I, V-iv
      This proffer is absurd and reasonless.
    • ca. 1710, Alexander Pope
      This phrase absurd to call a villain great
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 17, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      “Perhaps it is because I have been excommunicated. It's absurd, but I feel like the Jackdaw of Rheims.” ¶ She winced and bowed her head. Each time that he spoke flippantly of the Church he caused her pain.
    • 1979, Roger Hodgson (lyrics), “The Logical Song”, in Breakfast in America, performed by Supertramp:
      I know it sounds absurd / But please, tell me who I am
  2. (obsolete) Inharmonious; dissonant. [Attested only in the early 17th century.][3]
  3. Having no rational or orderly relationship to people's lives; meaningless; lacking order or value.
    • 1968 March 2, Joseph Featherstone, “A New Kind of Schooling”, in The New Republic:
      Adults have condemned them to live in what must seem like an absurd universe.
  4. Dealing with absurdism.

Usage notes[edit]

  • In the comparative and superlative degrees, the forms more absurd and most absurd are usually preferred over absurder, absurdest.

Synonyms[edit]

The terms below need to be checked and allocated to the definitions (senses) of the headword above. Each term should appear in the sense for which it is appropriate. For synonyms and antonyms you may use the templates {{syn|en|...}} or {{ant|en|...}}.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

absurd (plural absurds)

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
  1. (obsolete) An absurdity. [Attested from the early 17th century until the mid 17th century.][3]
  2. (philosophy, often preceded by the) The opposition between the human search for meaning in life and the inability to find any; the state or condition in which man exists in an irrational universe and his life has no meaning outside of his existence. [First attested in English in the early 20th century and first used in the mid-19th century in Danish by Kierkegaard.][3][4]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Laurence Urdang (editor), The Random House College Dictionary (Random House, 1984 [1975], →ISBN), page 7
  2. ^ Philip Babcock Gove (editor), Webster's Third International Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged (G. & C. Merriam Co., 1976 [1909], →ISBN), page 8
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 Lesley Brown, editor-in-chief; William R. Trumble and Angus Stevenson, editors (2002), “absurd”, in The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary on Historical Principles, 5th edition, Oxford; New York, N.Y.: Oxford University Press, →ISBN, page 10.
  4. ^ "Søren Kierkegaard" in The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin absurdus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

absurd (feminine absurda, masculine plural absurds, feminine plural absurdes)

  1. absurd

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

absurd m (plural absurds)

  1. absurdity

Further reading[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin absurdus (discordant, unreasonable).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /absurd/, [ɑbˈsuɐ̯ˀd̥]

Adjective[edit]

absurd (neuter absurd, plural and definite singular attributive absurde)

  1. absurd

Adverb[edit]

absurd

  1. absurdly

Derived terms[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Middle French absurde, from Latin absurdus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

absurd (comparative absurder, superlative absurdst)

  1. absurd

Inflection[edit]

Inflection of absurd
uninflected absurd
inflected absurde
comparative absurder
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial absurd absurder het absurdst
het absurdste
indefinite m./f. sing. absurde absurdere absurdste
n. sing. absurd absurder absurdste
plural absurde absurdere absurdste
definite absurde absurdere absurdste
partitive absurds absurders

Related terms[edit]


German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin absurdus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

absurd (comparative absurder, superlative am absurdesten)

  1. absurd

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Luxembourgish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German absurd, from Latin absurdus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

absurd (masculine absurden, neuter absurd, comparative méi absurd, superlative am absurdsten)

  1. absurd

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin absurdus (incongruous, dissonant, out of tune), from both ab- (from, away from, off), from Latin ab (from, away from, on, in), from Proto-Italic *ab, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂epó (off, away) + and from surdus (silent, deaf, dull-sounding), from Proto-Indo-European *swer- (to resound; ringing, whistling).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

absurd (neuter singular absurd, definite singular and plural absurde, comparative mer absurd, superlative mest absurd)

  1. absurd (contrary to reason or propriety; obviously and flatly opposed to manifest truth)
    • 1882, Henrik Ibsen, En folkefiende, page 164:
      absurde traditioner
      absurd traditions
    • 1907, Alexander L. Kielland, Samlede værker II (Mindeutgave), page 67:
      en saa absurd forbindelse – med en stor rødhaaret bondepige
      such an absurd connection - with a big red-haired peasant girl
    • 2000, Trude Marstein, Plutselig høre noen åpne en dør, page 188:
      situasjonen er absurd, tenker jeg
      the situation is absurd, I think
    • 1997, Espen Schaanning, Vitenskap som skapt viten, page 66:
      radikalt nye innfallsvinkler og synsmåter står alltid i fare for å framtre som absurde og paradoksale
      radically new approaches and views are always in danger of appearing absurd and paradoxical
    • 1999, Elsbeth Wessel, Wien, page 288:
      [keiser Frans Josef] var en ensom mann, resignert, men fylt av en nesten absurd pliktfølelse
      [Emperor Francis Joseph] was a lonely man, resigned, but filled with an almost absurd sense of duty
    • 2006, Lars Roar Langslet, Når fuglen letter, page 11:
      i billedkunsten er det åpenbart absurd å tale om noe fremskritt
      in the visual arts, it is obviously absurd to talk about any progress
    et absurd spørsmål
    an absurd question
    dette er jo ganske absurd
    this is quite absurd
    Synonyms: fornuftsstridig, meningsløs, irrasjonell
  2. (theater, literary sciences) absurdist (of or relating to absurdism)
    • 1982, Torolf Elster, Thomas Pihls annen lov, page 40:
      en absurd komedie eller et absurd melodrama
      an absurd comedy or an absurd melodrama
    • 1991, Åsfrid Svensen, Orden og kaos, page 326:
      i absurd litteratur mangler gjerne motsetningen mellom normalitet og fantastikk
      in absurd literature, the contrast between normality and fantastic is often lacking
    • 1998, Kjetil Rolness, Elvis Presley, page 37:
      framførelsen nærmer seg grensen til absurd komikk
      the performance is approaching the limit of absurd comedy
    • 1976, Leif Longum, Å lese skuespill, page 122:
      ordenes sammenbrudd, som kanskje er det viktigste fellestema ved det absurde teater
      the breakdown of words, which is perhaps the most important common theme of the absurd theater
    Synonym: absurdistisk

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin absurdus.

Adjective[edit]

absurd (neuter singular absurd, definite singular and plural absurde)

  1. absurd

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

From Latin absurdus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

absurd m inan (diminutive absurdzik)

  1. nonsense
    Synonym: nonsens
    Jego propozycje to jeden wielki absurd.
    His suggestions are one big load of nonsense.
  2. (logic) absurdity

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • absurd in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • absurd in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French absurde, Latin absurdus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

absurd m or n (feminine singular absurdă, masculine plural absurzi, feminine and neuter plural absurde)

  1. absurd

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin absurdus.

Adjective[edit]

absurd

  1. absurd

Declension[edit]

Inflection of absurd
Indefinite Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular absurd absurdare absurdast
Neuter singular absurt absurdare absurdast
Plural absurda absurdare absurdast
Masculine plural3 absurde absurdare absurdast
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 absurde absurdare absurdaste
All absurda absurdare absurdaste
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in the predicative.
3) Dated or archaic

Related terms[edit]


Tatar[edit]

Adjective[edit]

absurd

  1. Latin spelling of абсурд (absurd)