absurd

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

First attested in 1557. From Middle French absurde, from Latin absurdus ‎(incongruous, dissonant, out of tune),[1] from ab ‎(away from, out) + surdus ‎(silent, deaf, dull-sounding).[2] Compare surd.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

absurd ‎(comparative absurder or more absurd, superlative absurdest or most absurd)

  1. Contrary to reason or propriety; obviously and flatly opposed to manifest truth; inconsistent with the plain dictates of common sense; logically contradictory; nonsensical; ridiculous; silly. [First attested in the mid 16th century.][3]
    • 1591, William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part I, V-iv
      This proffer is absurd and reasonless.
    • ca. 1710, Alexander Pope
      This phrase absurd to call a villain great
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 17, The Mirror and the Lamp:
      “Perhaps it is because I have been excommunicated. It's absurd, but I feel like the Jackdaw of Rheims.” ¶ She winced and bowed her head. Each time that he spoke flippantly of the Church he caused her pain.
  2. (obsolete) Inharmonious; dissonant. [Attested only in the early 17th century.][3]
  3. Having no rational or orderly relationship to people's lives; meaningless; lacking order or value.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Adults have condemned them to live in what must seem like an absurd universe. - Joseph Featherstone
  4. Dealing with absurdism.

Usage notes[edit]

  • More and most absurd are the preferred or more common form of the comparable, as opposed to absurder and absurdest.
  • Among the synonyms:
    • Irrational is the weakest, denoting that which is plainly inconsistent with the dictates of sound reason; as, an irrational course of life.
    • Foolish rises higher, and implies either a perversion of that faculty, or an absolute weakness or fatuity of mind; as, foolish enterprises.
    • Absurd rises still higher, denoting that which is plainly opposed to received notions of propriety and truth; as, an absurd man, project, opinion, story, argument, etc.
    • Preposterous rises still higher, and supposes an absolute inversion in the order of things; or, in plain terms, a "putting of the cart before the horse;" as, a preposterous suggestion, preposterous conduct, a preposterous regulation or law.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

absurd ‎(plural absurds)

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

  1. (obsolete) An absurdity. [Attested from the early 17th century until the mid 17th century.][3]
  2. (philosophy, often preceded by the) The opposition between the human search for meaning in life and the inability to find any; the state or condition in which man exists in an irrational universe and his life has no meaning outside of his existence. [First attested in English in the early 20th century and first used in the mid-19th century in Danish by Kierkegaard.][3][4]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Laurence Urdang (editor), The Random House College Dictionary (Random House, 1984 [1975], ISBN 0-394-43600-8), page 7
  2. ^ Philip Babcock Gove (editor), Webster's Third International Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged (G. & C. Merriam Co., 1976 [1909], ISBN 0-87779-101-5), page 8
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 2003 [1933], Lesley Brown editor, The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary, 5th, Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, ISBN 978-0-19-860575-7, page 10:
  4. ^ "Søren Kierkegaard" in The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

External links[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin absurdus.

Adjective[edit]

absurd m ‎(feminine absurda, masculine plural absurds, feminine plural absurdes)

  1. absurd

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

absurd m ‎(plural absurds)

  1. absurdity

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin absurdus ‎(discordant, unreasonable).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /absurd/, [ɑbˈsuɐ̯ˀd̥]

Adjective[edit]

absurd ‎(neuter absurd, definite and plural absurde)

  1. absurd
  2. (adverbial) absurdly

Derived terms[edit]


German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin absurdus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

absurd ‎(comparative absurder, superlative am absurdesten)

  1. absurd

Declension[edit]

External links[edit]


Luxembourgish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin absurdus.

Adjective[edit]

absurd

  1. absurd

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin absurdus

Adjective[edit]

absurd ‎(neuter singular absurd, definite singular and plural absurde)

  1. absurd

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin absurdus

Adjective[edit]

absurd ‎(neuter singular absurd, definite singular and plural absurde)

  1. absurd

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Latin absurdus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

absurd m inan

  1. nonsense
    Jego propozycje to jeden wielki absurd.
    His suggestions are one big load of nonsense.

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

External links[edit]

  • absurd in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French absurde, Latin absurdus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

absurd

  1. absurd

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin absurdus.

Adjective[edit]

absurd

  1. absurd

Declension[edit]

Inflection of absurd
Indefinite/attributive Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular absurd absurdare absurdast
Neuter singular absurt absurdare absurdast
Plural absurda absurdare absurdast
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 absurde absurdare absurdaste
All absurda absurdare absurdaste
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in an attributive role.

Related terms[edit]