ridicule

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈɹɪdɪkjuːl/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: rid‧i‧cule

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from French ridicule, from Latin rīdiculus (laughable, comical, amusing, absurd, ridiculous), from ridere (to laugh).

Verb[edit]

ridicule (third-person singular simple present ridicules, present participle ridiculing, simple past and past participle ridiculed)

  1. (transitive) to criticize or disapprove of someone or something through scornful jocularity; to make fun of
    His older sibling constantly ridiculed him with sarcastic remarks.
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Noun[edit]

ridicule (countable and uncountable, plural ridicules)

  1. derision; mocking or humiliating words or behaviour
    • 1738, Alexander Pope, Epilogue to the Satires: Dialogue II
      Safe from the Bar, the Pulpit, and the Throne, / Yet touch'd and sham'd by Ridicule alone.
  2. An object of sport or laughter; a laughing stock.
    • 1857, Henry Thomas Buckle, History of Civilization in England
      [Marlborough] was so miserably ignorant, that his deficiencies made him the ridicule of his contemporaries.
    • 1563, John Foxe, Actes and Monuments
      To the people [] but a trifle, to the king but a ridicule.
  3. The quality of being ridiculous; ridiculousness.
    • 1710 April 1 (Gregorian calendar), Joseph Addison; Richard Steele, “TUESDAY, March 21, 1709–1710”, in The Spectator, number 18; republished in Alexander Chalmers, editor, The Spectator; a New Edition, [], volume I, New York, N.Y.: D[aniel] Appleton & Company, 1853, OCLC 191120697:
      to see the ridicule of this monstrous practice
    • 1842, Letitia Elizabeth Landon, Lady Anne Granard, volume 1, page 65:
      More keenly alive perhaps than any of her sisters to the little ridicules that belonged to Mrs. Palmer's character, she yet saw how small was their importance, and that Mrs. Palmer was not only a better but a happier person than most of those with whom she was acquainted.
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Adjective[edit]

ridicule (comparative more ridicule, superlative most ridicule)

  1. (obsolete) ridiculous
    • late 17th century, John Aubrey, Brief Lives
      This action [] became so ridicule.

Etymology 2[edit]

From French ridicule, probably jocular alteration of réticule.

Noun[edit]

ridicule (plural ridicules)

  1. (now historical) A small woman's handbag; a reticule. [from 18th c.]
    • c. 1825, Frances Burney, Journals and Letters, Penguin 2001, p. 455:
      I hastily drew my empty hand from my Ridicule.
    • 1838, Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist:
      ‘Pockets, women's ridicules, houses, mailcoaches [] ,’ said Mr. Claypole.

Further reading[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin rīdiculus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

ridicule (plural ridicules)

  1. ridiculous (all meanings)

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Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From rīdiculus (laughable; ridiculous), from rīdeō (to laugh; mock).

Adverb[edit]

rīdiculē (comparative rīdiculius, superlative rīdiculissimē)

  1. laughably, amusingly
  2. absurdly, ridiculously

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