achar

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Hindi आचार (ācār)/Urdu آچار (ācār), from Persian آچار (âčâr).

Noun[edit]

achar (countable and uncountable, plural achars)

  1. A spicy and salty pickle in Indian cuisine.

Anagrams[edit]


Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish ochair (edge), from Proto-Celtic *okris, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂óḱris (compare Latin ocris (rugged mountain), Ancient Greek ὄκρις (ókris, sharp edge)), from *h₂eḱ- (sharp).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

achar m (genitive singular achair)

  1. distance, journey; extent; area
    • 1899, Franz Nikolaus Finck, Die araner mundart, Marburg: Elwert’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, vol. II, p. 7:
      ḱē n t-axr̥, ə tā ən drehəd šin æš šo?
      conventional orthography:
      Cén t-achar atá an droichead sin as seo?
      What distance (i.e. how far) is that bridge from here?
  2. period of time
    • 1899, Franz Nikolaus Finck, Die araner mundart, Marburg: Elwert’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, vol. II, p. 8:
      ə wakə tū n bĭaiəx ūd lomsə, a çȧn̄ə mē tā axr̥ gȧŕəȷ?
      conventional orthography:
      An bhfaca tú an beithíoch úd liomsa a cheannaigh mé tá achar gairid?
      Did you see that cow of mine that I bought a short time ago?

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
achar n-achar hachar t-achar
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Matasović, Ranko (2009), “*akro-”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN, page 28

Further reading[edit]

  • ochair” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.
  • “achar” in Foclóir Gaeḋilge agus Béarla, Irish Texts Society, 1st ed., 1904, by Patrick S. Dinneen, page 3.
  • "achar" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Entries containing “achar” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “achar” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.
  • “achar” at the Historical Irish Corpus, 1600–1926 of the Royal Irish Academy.

Old Irish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

achar

  1. Alternative form of aicher

Declension[edit]

o/ā-stem
Singular Masculine Feminine Neuter
Nominative achar achar achar
Vocative achair*
achar**
Accusative achar achair
Genitive achair achrae, achaire achair
Dative achur achair achur
Plural Masculine Feminine/neuter
Nominative achair achra
Vocative achru
achra
Accusative achru
achra
Genitive achar
Dative achraib
Notes *modifying a noun whose vocative is different from its nominative

**modifying a noun whose vocative is identical to its nominative
† not when substantivized

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
achar unchanged n-achar
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Portuguese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Portuguese achar, from Latin afflāre, present active infinitive of afflō. Cognate with Spanish hallar.

Verb[edit]

achar (first-person singular present indicative acho, past participle achado)

  1. (transitive) to find; to encounter (to come across something that was unknown or had been lost)
    Preciso achar as chaves da minha casa.
    I need to find the keys to my house.
    Nenhum dos estudantes achou a resposta correta.
    None of the students found the correct answer.
  2. (ditransitive, copulative for the second object) to find; to consider (to have the opinion that a given thing has the given quality)
    Eu acho essa casa muito feia.
    I find this house very ugly.
    Acharam o filme interessante.
    They found the film interesting.
  3. (ditransitive, copulative for the second object) to find (to come across something in the given state)
    Caminhei até a vila e achei-a inundada.
    I walked to the village and found it flooded.
  4. (transitive with que) to think; to think that (to have the given opinion)
    Acho que vocês deviam ir embora.
    I think you all should go away.
    Acho que sim.
    I think so.
  5. (transitive with de) to think of (to have an opinion regarding the worth of someone or something)
    O que acharam do novo livro?
    What did they think of the new book?
    Me diga o que você acha.
    Let me know what you think.
  6. (takes a reflexive pronoun, copulative) to be (in the given state or condition)
    O livro se acha aberto.
    The book is open.
  7. (Brazil, slang, takes a reflexive pronoun) to be arrogant or act arrogantly; to think too highly of oneself
    Aquele otário está se achando com seu carro rebaixado.
    That sucker is being arrogant with his lowrider.
  8. first-person singular (eu) personal infinitive of achar
  9. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) personal infinitive of achar
  10. first-person singular (eu) future subjunctive of achar
  11. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) future subjunctive of achar
Conjugation[edit]
Quotations[edit]

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:achar.

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Hindi/Urdu आचार (ācār) / آچار (āćār), from Persian آچار (âčâr).

Noun[edit]

achar m (plural achares)

  1. achar (a spicy and salty pickle of Indian cuisine)
Quotations[edit]

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:achar.