tro

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See also: TRO, trò, trô, třo, trở, trø, and trɔ

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan [Term?] (compare Occitan tron), from Latin tonus (thunderclap; sound, tone) (possibly through a Late Latin or Vulgar Latin *tronus[1]), incremented with an -r- due to influence from *tronitus < tonitrus), and ultimately from Ancient Greek τόνος (tónos); compare also Portuguese trom, Spanish trueno). Compare the borrowed doublet to.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tro m (plural trons)

  1. thunder

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ “tro” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.

Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /troːˀ/, [ˈtˢʁ̥oˀ]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Danish tro, late Old Norse trú, either a native derivation from the verb or borrowed from Middle Low German trouwe, trūwe, from Proto-Germanic *trewwō (fidelity, pledge), cognate with English truce, German Treue (loyalty)

Noun[edit]

tro c (singular definite troen, not used in plural form)

  1. belief
  2. confidence
  3. trust
  4. faith
    Ingen kultur eller civilisation uden tro på guder.
    No culture or civilization without faith in gods.
Inflection[edit]
See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse trúa, from Proto-Germanic *trūwāną (to trust), cognate with English trow and German trauen. Derived from the adjective *trūaz (trustful), see below.

Verb[edit]

tro (past tense troede, past participle troet)

  1. to believe
  2. to think

Inflection[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old Norse trúr, from Proto-Germanic *trūaz (trustful), related to Proto-Germanic *trewwaz (loyal, trustworthy).

Adjective[edit]

tro (neuter tro, plural and definite singular attributive tro)

  1. faithful
  2. true
  3. loyal
  4. accurate, close

Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French trop.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • IPA(key): /tro/
  • Hyphenation: tro

Adverb[edit]

tro

  1. too much
    nek tro nek maltro
    neither too much nor too little

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Garo[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

tro

  1. era, period, generation

Ido[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Esperanto troFrench tropItalian troppo.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

tro

  1. too (much)
    Elua filiino irus, ma la voyo esas tro longa.
    Her daughter would go, but the road is too long.

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Old Norse trog.

Noun[edit]

tro m (plural tros)

  1. (Jersey) kneading trough

Synonyms[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse trú (noun), trúa (verb), and trúr (adjective).

Alternative forms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

tro (indeclinable)

  1. faithful, loyal
Antonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

tro f or m (definite singular troa or troen, uncountable)

  1. belief, faith
  2. trust, confidence
Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

tro (present tense tror, past tense trodde, past participle trodd, present participle troende)

  1. to think, believe
  2. to imagine, suppose
  3. to have faith

Etymology 2[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

tro

  1. simple past of trå

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse þró. Akin to obsolete English through

Noun[edit]

tro f (definite singular troa, indefinite plural trør, definite plural trørne)

  1. an oblong trough to give livestock drink and fodder
  2. (especially in compounds) a wooden water drain

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse tróð.

Noun[edit]

tro n (definite singular troet, uncountable)

  1. (collective) woodwork roofing
  2. (collective) stakes
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old Norse trǫð, same as trø.

Noun[edit]

tro f (definite singular troa, indefinite plural troer, definite plural troene)

  1. a place or location that is literally downtrodden

Etymology 4[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

tro

  1. (non-standard since 2012) past tense of tre, treda and trede
  2. (non-standard since 2012) past tense of trå

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *traucum (hole) (compare Late Latin traugum in the Capitularies of Charlemagne). Further origin uncertain. Possibly of Germanic or Celtic origin. Compare German Trog (trough), English trug, trough, all from Proto-Germanic *trugaz.

Noun[edit]

tro m (oblique plural tros, nominative singular tros, nominative plural tro)

  1. hole (gap in something)

Descendants[edit]

  • French: trou

References[edit]


Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish tremi, tre, from Proto-Celtic *trimo-, *trē, from Proto-Indo-European *terh₂-.

Preposition[edit]

tro

  1. through

Usage notes[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

  • The following prepositional pronouns:
Combining

pronoun

Prepositional

pronoun

Prepositional

pronoun (emphatic)

mi tromham tromhamsa
tu tromhad tromhadsa
e troimhe troimhesan
i troimhpe troimhpese
sinn tromhainn tromhainne
sibh tromhaibh tromhaibhse
iad tromhpa tromhpasan

Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Swedish trō, from Old Norse trú, from Proto-Germanic *trūwō

Noun[edit]

tro c (uncountable)

  1. faith, belief
    Ingen kultur eller civilisation utan tro på gudar.
    No culture or civilization without faith in gods.
  2. (dated) allegiance
    svära konungen tro och loven
    swear allegiance to the king
Declension[edit]
Declension of tro 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative tro tron
Genitive tros trons
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Swedish trōa, trōa, from Old Norse trúa, from Proto-Germanic *trūwāną.

Verb[edit]

tro (present tror, preterite trodde, supine trott, imperative tro)

  1. to believe
    tro alla om gott
    think well of everybody
    tro på något
    believe in something
    tro något om någon
    believe something of someone
  2. to think; to consider correct, but being unable to prove it
    Det har trotts mycket kring den här utvecklingen, men det har inte varit fastslaget i data vad som verkligen håller på att ske – förrän nu.
    Much has been speculated concerning this development, but it hasn't been proven by data what really is happening - until now.
  3. to think; to consider something correct that is not correct.
    Hon trodde att Oslo var Danmarks huvudstad
    She thought that Oslo was the capital of Denmark
Conjugation[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Vietnamese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Northern Vietnam) gio

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Vietic *p-lɔː.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tro (, , , 𤉓, 𤉕, 𤊣, 𪿙, 𬊐)

  1. ash (solid remains of a fire)

Derived terms[edit]

Derived terms

Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *tro, related to Middle Breton tro and middle Cornish tro.[1] The ultimate origin is unclear; sometimes said to be from Ancient Greek Τροία (Troía, Troy), referring to the city's maze-like walls, but this could just be a similarity enforced by folk etymology.[2][3] It could instead be from corruptions of troed (foot),[4] Latin torqueo (I turn), or Latin tropus/Ancient Greek τρόπος (trópos, a turn). Also compare French troller (to stroll, drag, wander about).[5] More at Caerdroia.

Noun[edit]

tro m (plural troeon)

  1. bend, turn, curve
  2. twist, kink
  3. turn, go
    fy nhro, dy dromy turn, your turn
  4. lap (of a race)
  5. walk (as recreation or exercise)
    mynd am droto go for a walk
Related terms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present) , “tro”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies
  2. ^ Biology and Human Affairs. (1975). United Kingdom: British Social Biology Council, p. 66
  3. ^ Lindsay, J. (1963). A Short History of Culture, from Prehistory to the Renaissance. United States: Citadel Press, p. 126
  4. ^ Matasović, Ranko (2009) , “treget-”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN, pages 389
  5. ^ Worcester, J. E. (1910). Worcester's Academic Dictionary: A New Etymological Dictionary of the English Language. United States: Lippincott, p. 551

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb[edit]

tro

  1. inflection of troi:
    1. third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
tro dro nhro thro
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.