oblong

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Oblong

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English oblong, oblonge, borrowed from Latin oblongus.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

oblong (comparative more oblong, superlative most oblong)

  1. Having a length and width that are different; not square or circular.
    • 1967, Sleigh, Barbara, Jessamy, 1993 edition, Sevenoaks, Kent: Bloomsbury, →ISBN, page 19:
      The room was quite dark. The oblong window showed the night sky pricked here and there with stars.
  2. (The addition of quotations indicative of this usage is being sought:) Roughly rectangular or elliptical.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

oblong (plural oblongs)

  1. Something with an oblong shape.
  2. A rectangle with length and width that are different.
    • 1967, Sleigh, Barbara, Jessamy, 1993 edition, Sevenoaks, Kent: Bloomsbury, →ISBN, page 88:
      Jessamy looked round her in a puzzled way, but there was nothing to see but the pale oblong of what looked like a star-pierced sky behind the bars of the nursery window.
  3. An ellipse with minor and major axes that are different.

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

oblong (third-person singular simple present oblongs, present participle oblonging, simple past and past participle oblonged)

  1. This term needs a definition. Please help out and add a definition, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.
    • 1670, John Bull, signed sealed and delivered in the psents of Antony Waters [/] Rachell (X) Waters; republished as “Town Minutes”, in Town Minutes of Newtown: 1656-1688 (Transcriptions of Early Town Records of New York; []), volume 1, New York, N.Y.: The Historical Records Survey, 1940, pages 181–182:
      [] ; by John Denmans hom lot on the north sid the front by a salt crek the reare to the comon which hom lot with all the upland oblonging to it conteining to about fourtie acers more or lese with about one acer & half of salt medo liing before the said house []
    • 1818, John Haywood, “Childress versus Holland. Whyte, Judge, delivered the opinion of himself and Judge Roane.”, in Reports of Cases Argued and Adjudged in the Court of Errors and Appeals of the State of Tennessee, from the Year 1816 to 1817, volume III, Knoxville, Tenn.: [] Heiskell & Brown, page 276:
      That the Gilbert tract, according to his opinion and the law, ought to have been oblonged up the creek. That by oblonging it across the creek, it afforded Elijah Robertson, who superintended the surveying, an opportunity of laying a warrant not located there, for himself, and thereby takes 5,000 acres.
    • 2008, Gary D. Schmidt, Trouble, New York, N.Y.: Clarion Books, →ISBN, page 287:
      And there were suddenly berries where there had been none before, bright red and bright blue, all with a careless water drop oblonging their form.

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin oblongus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

oblong (feminine oblonga, masculine plural oblongs, feminine plural oblongues)

  1. oblong

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin oblongus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

oblong (feminine singular oblongue, masculine plural oblongs, feminine plural oblongues)

  1. oblong

Further reading[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French oblong, from Latin oblongus.

Adjective[edit]

oblong m or n (feminine singular oblongă, masculine plural oblongi, feminine and neuter plural oblonge)

  1. oblong

Declension[edit]