lang

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

lang (plural langs)

  1. Abbreviation of language
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lang (comparative langer, superlative langest)

  1. (obsolete outside Northumbria) long
Usage notes[edit]
  • "Lang" was still used for "long" in several northern English dialects at the time of the Survey of English Dialects, but it is now virtually extinct.
Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Alemannic German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German lanc, from Old High German lang, from Proto-West Germanic *lang. Cognate with German lang, Dutch lang, English long, Icelandic langur.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lang (comparative lenger, superlative lengscht)

  1. long
  2. tall, high

Declension[edit]

Declension of lang
masculine feminine neuter plural
Weak inflection nominative/accusative langi langi langi lange
dative lange lange lange lange
Strong inflection nominative/accusative lange langi langs langi
dative lange lange lange lange

East Central German[edit]

Adverb[edit]

lang

  1. (Erzgebirgisch) already
    Ich saat ja lang, doß die Predigerschul in Berlin is und "Paulinium" haaßt.
    I already said, that the Preacher school is in Berlin and is called "Paulinium."
    Synonym: schu

Further reading[edit]

  • 1982 Karl-Heinz Schmidt, Itze schlöft dr Pastor ei : Heiteres aus dem Erzgebirge. P. 12

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse langr, from Proto-Germanic *langaz (long), cognate with Swedish lång, English long, German lang. The adjective goes back to Proto-Indo-European *dlongʰos, *dl̥h₁gʰós (long), which is also the source of Latin longus, Ancient Greek δολιχός (dolikhós).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lang (neuter langt, plural and definite singular attributive lange, comparative længere, superlative (predicative) længst, superlative (attributive) længste)

  1. long (having great distance)

Further reading[edit]

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch lanc, from Old Dutch *lang, from Proto-West Germanic *lang, from Proto-Germanic *langaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lang (comparative langer, superlative langst)

  1. long
    Antonym: kort
    Het was een lange dag.
    It was a long day.
  2. tall
    Antonyms: kort, klein
    Een lange man.
    A tall man.
  3. long (time), lengthy, a long time
    Het duurt lang.
    It takes a long time.
    Wie heeft het langst gespeeld?
    Who played longest?

Inflection[edit]

Inflection of lang
uninflected lang
inflected lange
comparative langer
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial lang langer het langst
het langste
indefinite m./f. sing. lange langere langste
n. sing. lang langer langste
plural lange langere langste
definite lange langere langste
partitive langs langers

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Afrikaans: lank
  • Berbice Creole Dutch: langgi
  • Jersey Dutch: lānk
  • Negerhollands: lang, laṅ
  • Sranan Tongo: langa

Adverb[edit]

lang

  1. (with negation) by far
    Lang niet iedereen houdt van vlees.
    Not everyone by far likes meat.

German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German lanc, from Old High German lang, from Proto-West Germanic *lang, from Proto-Germanic *langaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lang (strong nominative masculine singular langer, comparative länger, superlative am längsten)

  1. long; lengthy (in space or time)
    Antonym: kurz
  2. (of a person) tall
    Synonym: (commoner) groß
  3. (with units of time, chiefly Jahre) many (indicating the length of the time in total)
    Synonym: viel
    Er hat lange Jahre damit verbracht, diese Frage zu erörtern.
    He spent many years reasoning about this question.

Declension[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

  • (antonym(s) of "tall"): klein; kurz (latter rather rude)

Derived terms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

lang

  1. (chiefly colloquial, but also found in formal style) Alternative form of lange
    Der Ausflug hat lang gedauert.
    The trip took quite long.
  2. long, sprawled, stretched (physically)
    Er lag lang auf der Erde.
    He lay sprawled on the ground.

Postposition[edit]

lang (+ accusative)

  1. for (temporal)
    Er ist ein Jahr lang um die Welt gereist.
    He travelled around the world for one year.
    Ich habe mein ganzes Leben lang die Relativitätstheorie studiert.
    I studied relativistic physics my entire life.
    • 2010, Der Spiegel[1], number 34/2010, page 87:
      Die Pharmakonzerne müssen ihre Preise nun drei Jahre lang auf dem Niveau vom Sommer 2009 einfrieren.
      The pharmaceutical companies now have to freeze their prices for three years at the level of summer 2009.
  2. (chiefly colloquial, but also found in formal style) Alternative form of entlang
    Gehen Sie einfach diese Straße lang!
    Just go along this street!
    Wo lang? Hier lang!
    Which way? This way!

Verb[edit]

lang

  1. singular imperative of langen

Further reading[edit]

  • lang” in Duden online
  • lang” in Duden online
  • lang” in Duden online
  • lang” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache
  • lang” in Uni Leipzig: Wortschatz-Lexikon
  • lang” in OpenThesaurus.de

Haitian Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French langue (language).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lang

  1. A language.
  2. A tongue.

Synonyms[edit]

Hokkien[edit]

For pronunciation and definitions of lang – see (“sparse”).
(This term is the pe̍h-ōe-jī form of ).

Hunsrik[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German lanc, from Old High German lang.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lang (comparative lenger, superlative lengest)

  1. long

Declension[edit]

Declension of lang (see also Appendix:Hunsrik adjectives)
masculine feminine neuter plural
Weak inflection nominative lang lang lang lange
accusative lange lang lang lange
dative lange lange lange lange
Strong inflection nominative langer lange langes lange
accusative lange lange langes lange
dative langem langer langem lange

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Icelandic[edit]

Noun[edit]

lang m

  1. accusative indefinite singular of langur
  2. dative indefinite singular of langur

Indonesian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

lang (plural lang-lang, first-person possessive langku, second-person possessive langmu, third-person possessive langnya)

  1. aphetic form of êlang (eagle)
  2. (obsolete) aphetic form of selang

Etymology 2[edit]

From Betawi [Term?], probably from Dutch lang (tall), from Middle Dutch lanc, from Old Dutch *lang, from Proto-Germanic *langaz.

Noun[edit]

lang (plural lang-lang, first-person possessive langku, second-person possessive langmu, third-person possessive langnya)

  1. tiered table

Further reading[edit]

Lashi[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Classifier[edit]

lang

  1. Classifier for big moving objects, like a river.

References[edit]

  • Hkaw Luk (2017) A grammatical sketch of Lacid[2], Chiang Mai: Payap University (master thesis)

Low German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Low German lang, from Old Saxon lang, from Proto-West Germanic *lang. Cognate to German lang, Dutch lang, English long.

Adjective[edit]

lang (comparative länger, superlative längst)

  1. long

Declension[edit]

Ludian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Finnic *lanka.

Noun[edit]

lang

  1. A yarn.

Malay[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Austroasiatic; compare Bahnar klang, Pacoh calang, Khmer ខ្លែង (khlaeng), Mang laːŋ¹, Central Nicobarese [Nancowry] kalâng and Chong kʰlaːˀŋ. Doublet of elang and helang.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lang (Jawi spelling لڠ, plural lang-lang, informal 1st possessive langku, 2nd possessive langmu, 3rd possessive langnya)

  1. eagle (Any of several large carnivorous birds in the family Accipitridae)
    Synonyms: elang, helang

References[edit]

  • Pijnappel, Jan (1875), “الڠ lang”, in Maleisch-Hollandsch woordenboek, John Enschede en Zonen, Frederik Muller, pages 116
  • Wilkinson, Richard James (1901), “لڠ lang”, in A Malay-English dictionary, Hong Kong: Kelly & Walsh limited, page 599
  • Wilkinson, Richard James (1932), “lang”, in A Malay-English dictionary (romanised), volume II, Mytilene, Greece: Salavopoulos & Kinderlis, pages 15-6

Further reading[edit]

Mandarin[edit]

Romanization[edit]

lang

  1. Nonstandard spelling of lāng.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of láng.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of lǎng.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of làng.

Usage notes[edit]

  • Transcriptions of Mandarin into the Latin script often do not distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without indication of tone.

Masbatenyo[edit]

Adverb[edit]

lang

  1. just; only; merely

Mato[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lang

  1. water

References[edit]

  • Phonological Descriptions of Papua New Guinea Languages (2005, SIL, edited by Steve Parker), section Mato (Nenaya, Nengaya, Nineia) Language, page 28: lang [ˈlɑŋ] 'water'

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lang (neuter singular langt, definite singular and plural lange, comparative lengre, indefinite superlative lengst, definite superlative lengste)

  1. long
  2. tall

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse langr. Akin to English long.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lang (masculine and feminine lang, neuter langt, definite singular and plural lange, comparative lengre, indefinite superlative lengst, definite superlative lengste)

  1. long (of physical length)
    Når fekk du det lange håret?
    When did you get such long hair?
  2. long (of duration)
    Denne filmen var lang.
    This movie was long.

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

Nyishi[edit]

Numeral[edit]

lang

  1. hundred

Old English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *lang, from Proto-Germanic *langaz, from Proto-Indo-European *dlongʰos.

Cognate with Old Frisian long, Old Saxon lang, Old High German lang, Old Norse langr, Gothic 𐌻𐌰𐌲𐌲𐍃 (laggs), and outside of Germanic, with Latin longus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lang (comparative lengra, superlative lenġest)

  1. long
    • late 9th century, King Alfred's translation of Boethius' The Consolation of Philosophy
      Iċ onġiete þæt iċ þē hæbbe āþrotenne mid þȳ langan spelle.
      I can see I've bored you with that long tangent.
    • preface to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, manuscript E
      Bretene īeġland is eahta hund mīla lang and twā hund brād.
      The island of Britain is eight hundred miles long and two hundred miles wide.
    • late 9th century, Old English Martyrology
      Þonne blōtmōnaþ ġeendaþ, þonne biþ sēo niht sixtīene tīda lang and sē dæġ eahta tīda.
      At the end of November, the nights are sixteen hours long and the days are eight hours.
    • Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Manuscript A, year 893
      Sē wudu is ēastlang and westlang hundtwelftiġes mīla lang oþþe lengra and þrītiġes mīla brād.
      The forest is 120 miles long or longer from east to west, and 30 miles wide.
    • late 9th century, Old English Martyrology
      On þā swīðran healfe þām ingange is stǣnen bedd seofon fōta lang and þrim mundum hīere þonne þæs hūses flōr.
      To the right of the entrance, there is a stone bed that is seven feet long and three hands higher than the floor of the house.
    • late 9th century, anonymous translation of Orosius’ History Against the Pagans
      Ne wēne iċ, nū iċ lang spell hæbbe tō seċġenne, þæt iċ hīe on þisse bēċ ġeendian mæġe, ac iċ ōðre onġinnan sċeal.
      Since I have some long stories to tell, I don't think I can finish them in this book, so I'll have to start another one.
    • c. 996, Ælfric's Lives of Saints
      Hē ǣt þā and dranc and eft wearþ on slǣpe, ac sē enġel hine āwreahte ōðre sīðe and cwæþ, "Ārīs hraðe and et. Þū hæfst swīðe langne weġ."
      Then he ate and drank and went back to sleep, but the angel woke him up a second time and said, "Come on, get up and eat. You have a very long journey ahead of you."
    • Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Manuscript A, year 897
      Þā hēt Ælfrēd cyning timbran langsċipu onġēan þā æscas. Þā wǣron fulnēah twā swā lang swā þā ōðru. Sumu hæfdon sixtiġ āra, sumu mā. Þā wǣron ǣġðer ġe swiftran ġe unwealtran ġe ēac hīeran þonne þā ōðru; nǣron nāwðer ne on Frīsisċ ġesċeapen ne on Denisċ, ac swā him selfum þūhte þæt hīe nytwierðest bēon meahten.
      Then King Alfred had longships built to oppose the askar [small, light Viking ships used for raids]. They were almost twice as long as the others. Some had 60 oars, some more. They were both swifter and steadier as well as higher than the others, and they were not based on Frisian design or Danish, but on what he himself thought would be the most useful.
    • c. 995, Ælfric, Extracts on Grammar in English
      Ān nama is þissum ġelīċe on ġeendunge and nā on andġiete: hic senior ("þēs ealda mann oþþe ealdor"). Þā ōðre sind ealle mǣst werlīċes cynnes (hic doctor "þēs lārēow," hic salīnātor "þēs sealtere"), and ealle unlīchamlīċe (hic furor "þēos hātheortnes," horror "ōga," labor "ġeswinc," sūdor "swāt," pallor "blācung," pudor "sċamu," decor "wlite," calor "hǣtu," fervor "wielm," rubor "rēadnes oþþe sċamu," algor "ċiele"), and ealle þās and ōðre þyslīċe habbaþ langne ō on ġebīeġedum fiellum.
      One noun is like these in ending but not in meaning: hic senior ("this old person or elder"). The others are almost all masculine (hic doctor "this teacher," hic salinator "this salter"), including all the abstract nouns (hic furor "this fury," horror "horror," labor "labor," sudor "sweat," pallor "paleless," pudor "shame," decor "beauty," calor "heat," fervor "boiling heat," rubor "redness or shame," algor "coldness"), and all of these and others like them have a long o in inflected cases.
  2. tall
    • c. 1000, unknown author, Vercelli Homily IX
      Ġif hwelċ mann biþ on helle āne niht, þonne biþ him lēofre þæt hē hangiġe seofon þūsende wintra on þām lenġestan treowe ufeweardum.
      Anyone who spends one day in hell would rather hang for seven thousand years from the top of the tallest tree.
    • late 9th century, King Alfred's translation of Boethius' The Consolation of Philosophy
      Þæt is nū þæs līchaman gōd þæt man sīe fæġer, and strang, and lang, and brād, and manegu ōðru gōd ēac þām.
      The virtues of the body are that a person is beautiful, strong, tall, and broad, and many other virtues besides these.
    • c. 996, Ælfric's Lives of Saints
      Þā ġeseah hē onġemang ōðrum twēġen ġeonge cneohtas, þæt hīe wǣron wlitiġe on hīewe and lange on wæstmum.
      Then he (Trajan) spotted two boys in the crowd and noticed they were beautiful in appearance and tall in stature.

Declension[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *lang, related to Old English lang, Old Norse langr.

Adjective[edit]

lang

  1. long

Descendants[edit]

Old Saxon[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *lang.

Adjective[edit]

lang

  1. long

Declension[edit]


Descendants[edit]

Pennsylvania German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German lanc, from Old High German lang. Compare German lang, Dutch lang, English long.

Adjective[edit]

lang

  1. long
  2. diluted
    langi Briehdiluted broth

Plautdietsch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Low German lanc, from Old Saxon lang.

Adjective[edit]

lang

  1. long (in time)

Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English lang, from Old English lang (long, tall, lasting). Cognate with English long.

Adjective[edit]

lang (comparative langer, superlative langest)

  1. long

Adverb[edit]

lang (comparative langer, superlative langest)

  1. long

Derived terms[edit]

Tagalog[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Contraction of laang or lamang.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

lang (Baybayin spelling ᜎᜅ᜔)

  1. only; just
    Synonym: lamang

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • lang”, in Pambansang Diksiyonaryo | Diksiyonaryo.ph, Manila, 2018

Tok Pisin[edit]

Noun[edit]

lang

  1. A fly (insect).

Veps[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Finnic *lanka, probably borrowed from Proto-Germanic *langô. Cognate with Finnish lanka.

Noun[edit]

lang

  1. yarn, thread

Declension[edit]

Inflection of lang (inflection type 5/sana)
nominative sing. lang
genitive sing. langan
partitive sing. langad
partitive plur. langoid
singular plural
nominative lang langad
accusative langan langad
genitive langan langoiden
partitive langad langoid
essive-instructive langan langoin
translative langaks langoikš
inessive langas langoiš
elative langaspäi langoišpäi
illative langaha langoihe
adessive langal langoil
ablative langalpäi langoilpäi
allative langale langoile
abessive langata langoita
comitative langanke langoidenke
prolative langadme langoidme
approximative I langanno langoidenno
approximative II langannoks langoidennoks
egressive langannopäi langoidennopäi
terminative I langahasai langoihesai
terminative II langalesai langoilesai
terminative III langassai
additive I langahapäi langoihepäi
additive II langalepäi langoilepäi

Vietnamese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lang ()

  1. roan, piebald
    con bò langroan cow
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

lang (𫉱, , )

  1. (only in compounds) sweet potato
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Sino-Vietnamese word from .

Noun[edit]

lang

  1. (only in compounds) man; male
See also[edit]
Derived terms