lang may yer lum reek

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

PIE word
*dlongʰos

Borrowed from Scots lang may yer (or your) lum reek (expression of good wishes for one’s prosperity, literally long may your chimney smoke):[1] from lang (long),[2] lum (chimney),[3] and reek (of a chimney: to emit smoke).[4]

Pronunciation[edit]

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Particularly: "Scotland"

Phrase[edit]

lang may yer lum reek

  1. (Scotland) Used to wish someone well, especially as a drinking toast or a farewell.
    • 1895 March–April, Andrew Craighead, “‘Lang May Your Lum Reek’”, in The British Printer, volume VIII, number 44, London: Raithby, Lawrence & Co. [], OCLC 816309870, page 117:
      The B[ritish] P[rinter] is much appreciated in our office. It is regarded as indispensable, and is beyond doubt the best Trade Journal. Lang may your lum reek.
    • 1896, Joseph Parker, “Note XXIX. [Concerning ‘Bits’.]”, in Might Have Been: Some Life Notes, New York, N.Y.: Frederick A[bbott] Stokes Company, OCLC 11581138, page 187:
      If he will only see that Protestantism is protected, my daily prayer shall be, "Lang may your lum reek," a prayer which warms and gladdens every Scottish heart.
    • 1922 February, James Joyce, “[Episode 14: Oxen of the Sun]”, in Ulysses, Paris: Shakespeare and Company, [], OCLC 560090630, part II [Odyssey], page 404:
      Lang may your lum reek and your kalipot boil!
    • 1998, Alan Grant, Batman: Scottish Connection, London: Titan Books, →ISBN, page 47:
      And as they say—lang may yer lum reek!
    • 2005, Peter Kerr, From Paella to Porridge: A Farewell to Mallorca and a Scottish Adventure, Chichester, West Sussex: Summersdale Publishers, →ISBN:
      'And lang may yer lum reek on other folk's coal,' Jock reciprocated.
    • 2008, Ron Benrey; Janet Benrey, chapter 14, in Season of Glory (Love Inspired Suspense), New York, N.Y.: Steeple Hill Books, →ISBN, page 155:
      In the event I don't see you again before you leave Glory—well, you know, cheerio, cheery-bye and lang may yer lum reek!
    • 2012 May 2, Will Riding, chapter 9, in Flight of the Yellow Bowler, Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire: AuthorHouse, →ISBN, page 126:
      Lang may your lum reek,’ called Fingal as his guest drifted out of sight. [] ‘Lang may your lum what?’ Ben murmured to himself. Just catching the question, Alec whispered – ‘reek. Lang may your lum reek. Long may your chimney smoke. That’s what. Long may you live, you see.’
    • 2015, Leah Marie Brown, Finding It (An It Girl Novel), New York, N.Y.: Lyrical Press, Kensington Publishing Corp., →ISBN:
      "A'll see y Monday next, then," Grinning Hottie says, giving Angus one of those Macho Man half hugs with the bruising back slap. "Lang may yer lum reek." Angus laughs, slaps Grinning Hottie on the back, and repeats the salutation. He says it so fast, though, that it almost sounds like, "Long may your bum reek."

Usage notes[edit]

This phrase was originally a traditional Scots Hogmanay toast, but has passed into general English usage in Scotland.

Alternative forms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ “lang may your lum reek” under “reek, n.1, v.”, in The Dictionary of the Scots Language, Edinburgh: Scottish Language Dictionaries, 2004–present, OCLC 57069714, reproduced from W[illiam] Grant and D[avid] D. Murison, editors, The Scottish National Dictionary, Edinburgh: Scottish National Dictionary Association, 1931–1976, →OCLC.
  2. ^ lang, ''adj., adv., n., v.”, in The Dictionary of the Scots Language, Edinburgh: Scottish Language Dictionaries, 2004–present, OCLC 57069714, reproduced from W[illiam] Grant and D[avid] D. Murison, editors, The Scottish National Dictionary, Edinburgh: Scottish National Dictionary Association, 1931–1976, →OCLC.
  3. ^ lum, n.1, v.1”, in The Dictionary of the Scots Language, Edinburgh: Scottish Language Dictionaries, 2004–present, OCLC 57069714, reproduced from W[illiam] Grant and D[avid] D. Murison, editors, The Scottish National Dictionary, Edinburgh: Scottish National Dictionary Association, 1931–1976, →OCLC.
  4. ^ reek, n.1, v.”, in The Dictionary of the Scots Language, Edinburgh: Scottish Language Dictionaries, 2004–present, OCLC 57069714, reproduced from W[illiam] Grant and D[avid] D. Murison, editors, The Scottish National Dictionary, Edinburgh: Scottish National Dictionary Association, 1931–1976, →OCLC.