rot

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See also: Rot, rót, röt, rôt, and rōt

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Middle English rotten, roten, from Old English rotian (to rot, become corrupted, ulcerate, putrefy), from Proto-Germanic *rutōną (to rot), from Proto-Indo-European *reud- (to tear), from *reu- (to tear, dig, gather). Cognate with West Frisian rotsje (to rot), Dutch rotten (to rot), German rößen (to steep flax) and German verrotten (to rot), Icelandic rotna (to rot). See rotten.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

rot (third-person singular simple present rots, present participle rotting, simple past and past participle rotted)

  1. (intransitive) To suffer decomposition due to biological action, especially by fungi or bacteria.
    • Alexander Pope
      Fixed like a plant on his peculiar spot, / To draw nutrition, propagate, and rot.
  2. (intransitive) To decline in function or utility.
  3. (intransitive) To deteriorate in any way.
    I hope they all rot in prison for what they've done.
    • Macaulay
      Four of the sufferers were left to rot in irons.
    • Thackeray
      Rot, poor bachelor, in your club.
  4. (transitive) To make putrid; to cause to be wholly or partially decomposed by natural processes.
    to rot vegetable fiber
  5. (transitive) To expose, as flax, to a process of maceration, etc., for the purpose of separating the fiber; to ret.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

rot (plural rots)

  1. The process of becoming rotten; putrefaction.
  2. Any of several diseases in which breakdown of tissue occurs.
    • Milton
      His cattle must of rot and murrain die.
  3. Verbal nonsense.

Synonyms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin ructus

Noun[edit]

rot m (plural rots)

  1. belcher

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

rot (comparative rotter, superlative rotst)

  1. rotten, spoiled, decayed, putrid
  2. rotten, tedious, unkind, mean

Declension[edit]

Noun[edit]

rot n (plural rotten, diminutive rotje n)

  1. rot, something rotten, something rotting
  2. (military) a file (of men)

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ructus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rot m (plural rots)

  1. (colloquial) belch, burp

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ruptus.

Adjective[edit]

rot (feminine rote)

  1. broken

Related terms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


German[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German rōt (red, red-haired), from Old High German rōt (red, scarlet, purple-red, brown-red, yellow-red), from Proto-Germanic *raudaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁rowdʰós, from *h₁rewdʰ-. Compare Low German root, rod, rot, Dutch rood, English red, West Frisian read, Danish rød.

Adjective[edit]

rot (comparative röter or roter, superlative am rötesten or rotesten)

  1. red
  2. red-haired (short for rothaarig)
  3. (politics) leftist; on the left of the political spectrum
  4. (politics, Germany) specifically, pertaining to the SPD (a large social democratic party in Germany) or Linke (a far-left political party in Germany)
  5. (historical, offensive) Indian (pertaining to the Native Americans)

Declension[edit]

declension with umlaut
declension without umlaut

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


German Low German[edit]

Adjective[edit]

rot

  1. Alternative spelling of root.

Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

rot n (genitive singular rots, no plural)

  1. unconsciousness, insensibility
Declension[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

rot n (genitive singular rots, nominative plural rot)

  1. rot, decay, putrefaction
Declension[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

rot

  1. rafsi of rotsu.

Norwegian[edit]

Verb[edit]

rot

  1. Imperative of rote.

Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *raudaz (compare Old Saxon rōd, Old English rēad, Old Norse rauðr, Gothic 𐍂𐌰𐌿𐌸𐍃 (rauþs)), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁rowdʰós, from *h₁rewdʰ-.

Adjective[edit]

rōt

  1. red

Descendants[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rot c

  1. root; the part of a plant under the surface.
  2. the part of a tooth extending into the bone holding the tooth in place
  3. source; an underlying cause
    Kärleken till pengar är roten till allt ont
    The love of money is the root of all evil
  4. (mathematics) of a number n, a positive number which, when raised to a specified power, yields n; the square root is understood if no power is specified
    Kubikroten ur 27 är 3
    The cube root of 27 is 3
    Multiplicera med roten ur 2
    Multiply by root 2
  5. (mathematics) a zero (of a function).
  6. (mathematics) a designated node in a tree.
  7. (mathematics) curl; a measure on how fast a vector field rotates: it can be described as the cross product of del and a given vectorial field
  8. (computing) root directory
  9. (philology) a word from which another word is derived.

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

See also[edit]


Tok Pisin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

English road

Noun[edit]

rot

  1. road, street
    • '2003, Mühlhäusler et al., Tok Pisin texts, John Benjamins Publishing Company, page 9:
      Planti liklik rot i stap long ailan hia.
      Many little roads exist on this island.

References[edit]

Tok Pisin texts: from the beginning to the present / edited by Peter Mühlhäusler, Thomas E. Dutton, Suzanne Romaine. / John Benjamins Publishing Company / Copyright 2003 / ISBN 90 272 4718 8 / page 106


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