rout

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English routen, ruten, from Old English hrūtan (to make a noise, whiz, snore), also rēotan, *hrēotan (to make a noise, make a noise in grief, weep, mourn, lament, wail, shed tears), both from Proto-Germanic *hrūtaną, *hreutaną (to snore, snort), from Proto-Indo-European *ker-, *kor-, *kr- (to croak, crow). Cognate with Middle Dutch ruyten (to make a noise, chatter, chirp), Middle High German rūzen, rūssen (to make a noise, rattle, buzz, snore), Icelandic rjóta, hrjóta (to roar, rattle, snore). Related also to Swedish ryta (to roar, bellow, shout), Icelandic rauta (to roar).

Verb[edit]

rout (third-person singular simple present routs, present participle routing, simple past and past participle routed)

  1. (intransitive) To make a noise; roar; bellow; snort.
  2. (intransitive) To snore; snore loudly.
    • Chaucer, The Reve's Tale
      "Men might hir routing heren a furlong."
  1. (intransitive) To belch.
  2. (intransitive) To howl as the wind; make a roaring noise.
Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

rout (plural routs)

  1. A noise; a loud noise; a bellowing; a shouting; clamor; an uproar; disturbance; tumult.
    • Sterne
      This new book the whole world makes such a rout about.
    • Trench
      "My child, it is not well," I said, / "Among the graves to shout; / To laugh and play among the dead, / And make this noisy rout."
  2. Snoring.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English ruten (to rush, dart, dash, beat), from Old Norse hrjóta (to jump down, fall out, plunge, hurl, burst forth, rebound, fly, be flung), from Proto-Germanic *hreutaną (to plunge, rush, hurl, shatter, fall, break), from Proto-Indo-European *kreu- (to fall, plunge, rush, topple). Cognate with Middle High German rûzen (to move quickly, storm). Related also to Old English hrēosan (to fall, sink, fall down, go to ruin, rush, rush upon, attack). More at rush.

Verb[edit]

rout (third-person singular simple present routs, present participle routing, simple past and past participle routed)

  1. (transitive, now chiefly dialectal) To beat; strike; assail with blows.
Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

rout (plural routs)

  1. (now chiefly dialectal) A violent movement; a great or violent stir; a heavy blow; a stunning blow; a stroke.

Etymology 3[edit]

1598, "disorderly retreat," from Middle French route "disorderly flight of troops," literally "a breaking off, rupture," from Vulgar Latin rupta "a dispersed group," literally "a broken group," from Latin rupta, feminine past participle of rumpere "to break" (see rupture). The verb is from 1600.

Noun[edit]

rout (plural routs)

  1. A troop or group, especially of a traveling company or throng.
    • Spenser
      A rout of people there assembled were.
  2. A disorderly and tumultuous crowd; a mob; hence, the rabble; the herd of common people.
    • Spenser
      the endless routs of wretched thralls
    • Shakespeare
      the ringleader and head of all this rout
    • Milton
      Nor do I name of men the common rout.
    • 1663, Hudibras, by Samuel Butler, part 1, canto 1
      When Gospel-Trumpeter, surrounded / With long-ear'd rout, to battle sounded, / And pulpit, drum ecclesiastick, / Was beat with fist, instead of a stick;
    • 1928, H. P. Lovecraft, "The Call of Cthulhu", Weird Tales, Vol. 11, No. 2, pages 159–178, 287:
      [] although there must have been nearly a hundred mongrel celebrants in the throng, the police relied on their firearms and plunged determinedly into the nauseous rout.
  3. The state of being disorganized and thrown into confusion, especially when retreating from a fight.
  4. The act of defeating and breaking up an army or another opponent.
    The rout of the enemy was complete.
    • 2018 February 10, Phil McNulty, “Tottenham Hotspur 1 - 0 Arsenal”, in BBC[1]:
      It was only the outstanding Cech that stood between Arsenal and a second-half rout as Spurs simply swamped their opponents after the break with a formidable display of power, pace and sheer intensity.
    • Daniel
      Thy army [] / Dispersed in rout, betook them all to fly.
    • Alexander Pope
      To these glad conquest, murderous rout to those.
  5. (law) A disturbance of the peace by persons assembled together with the intent to do a thing which, if executed, would make them rioters, and actually making a motion toward the executing thereof.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Wharton to this entry?)
  6. A fashionable assembly, or large evening party.
    • 1824, Walter Savage Landor, Imaginary Conversations, Vol. I, "Southey and Porson":
      The ancients have always been opposed to them; just as, at routs and dances, elderly beauties to younger.
    • 1832, "The Premier and his Wife: A Story of the Great World," Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Vol. XXXI. No. CLXXXIX (January 1832):
      The envoys were not often compelled to forego the toilet for the desk, nor the beaux secretaires, to give up their lessons on the guitar for the drudgery of copying dispatches. A “protocol” would have scared the gentle state from its propriety; and the arrival of the Morning Post, once a week from London, with the account of routs in which they had not shared, and the anticipation of dinners and déjeúnés which they were never to enjoy, was the only pain which Diplomacy suffered to raise a ripple on the tranquil surface of its soul.
    • 1848, William Makepeace Thackeray, Vanity Fair, Chapter 23:
      By a little inquiry regarding his mother's engagements, he was pretty soon able to find out by whom of her ladyship's friends parties were given at that season; where he would be likely to meet Osborne's sisters; and, though he had that abhorrence of routs and evening parties which many sensible men, alas! entertain, he soon found one where the Misses Osborne were to be present.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

rout (third-person singular simple present routs, present participle routing, simple past and past participle routed)

  1. (transitive) To defeat completely, forcing into disorderly retreat.
    • Clarendon
      That party [] that charged the Scots, so totally routed and defeated their whole army, that they fled.
    • 2009 January 30, Adam Entous, "Mitchell warns of setbacks ahead in Mideast talks" (news article), Reuters:
      Israel tightened its blockade of the Gaza Strip after Hamas routed secular Fatah forces loyal to Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas and seized control of the enclave in June 2007.
  2. (intransitive) To retreat from a confrontation in disorder.
    • 2005, Brian Todd Carey, Joshua Allfree, John Cairns, Warfare in the Ancient World, Pen and Sword, →ISBN.
      The Ra division broke in panic and fled up against the just-arriving Amon division, which as a result began to rout as well.
  3. (obsolete, intransitive) To assemble in a crowd, whether orderly or disorderly; to collect in company.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Chaucer
      In all that land no Christian durste route.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)

Translations[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

Alteration of root.

Verb[edit]

rout (third-person singular simple present routs, present participle routing, simple past and past participle routed)

  1. To search or root in the ground, like a pig.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Edwards to this entry?)
  2. To scoop out with a gouge or other tool; to furrow.
  3. To use a router in woodworking.

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Alemannic German[edit]

Adjective[edit]

rout

  1. (Carcoforo) red

References[edit]

  • Umberto Patuzzi, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar, Luserna: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien.

Luxembourgish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German rōt, from Proto-Germanic *raudaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

rout (masculine rouden, neuter rout, comparative méi rout, superlative am routsten)

  1. red

Declension[edit]

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

See also[edit]

Colors in Luxembourgish · Faarwen (layout · text)
     wäiss      gro      schwaarz      brong
             rosa              rout              orange              giel
                          gréng                          
             himmelblo              blo              violett ; indigo              magenta ; mof