tumult

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Tumult

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French tumulte, from Latin tumultus (noise, tumult).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈtjuː.mʌlt/, /ˈtuː.mʌlt/, /ˈtʌməlt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌlt

Noun[edit]

tumult (plural tumults)

  1. Confused, agitated noise as made by a crowd.
  2. Violent commotion or agitation, often with confusion of sounds.
    • 2018 January 1, Donald McRae, “The Guardian footballer of the year 2017: Juan Mata”, in the Guardian[1]:
      Football is a game of tumult and glory, of small disappointments and lingering dreams, and Mata has played long enough at the highest level to appreciate these truths.
    the tumult of the elements
    the tumult of the spirits or passions
  3. A riot or uprising.

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Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Verb[edit]

tumult (third-person singular simple present tumults, present participle tumulting, simple past and past participle tumulted)

  1. (obsolete) To make a tumult; to be in great commotion.
    • (Can we date this quote?) John Milton
      Importuning and tumulting even to the fear of a revolt.

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin tumultus (noise, tumult).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /tumult/, [tˢuˈmulˀd̥]

Noun[edit]

tumult c (singular definite tumulten, plural indefinite tumulter)

  1. uproar, tumult
  2. riot, disturbance
  3. scuffle

Inflection[edit]

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Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin tumultus

Noun[edit]

tumult n (plural tumulturi)

  1. tumult

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