rut

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See also: Rut, Rút, rüt, rút, rứt, and rụt

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɹʌt/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌt

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English rutte (noun) and rutten (verb), from Old French rut (noise, roar, bellowing), from Latin rugītus, from rugīre (to roar).

Noun[edit]

rut (plural ruts)

  1. (zoology) Sexual desire or oestrus of cattle, and various other mammals. [from early 15th c.]
  2. The noise made by deer during sexual excitement.
  3. Roaring, as of waves breaking upon the shore; rote.
  4. (fandom slang) In omegaverse fiction, the intense biological urge of an alpha to mate, typically triggered by proximity to an omega in heat.
    • 2017, Marianne Gunderson, "What is an omega?: Rewriting sex and gender in omegaverse fanfiction", thesis submitted to the University of Oslo, page 36:
      Proximity to an omega in heat can sometimes cause alphas go into rut, an aggressive need for sexual intercourse usually triggered by the scent of an omega in heat.
    • 2019, Tessa Barone, "Just Go Find Yourself a Nice Alpha: Gender and Consent in Supernatural Fandom's Alpha/Beta/Omega Universe", thesis submitted to Oregon State University, page 34:
      All the characters in this story pressure Dean to help Castiel through his rut, and clearly consider Dean’s resistance to be immature and an overreaction.
    • 2019, Chris van der Vegt, "The Second Genders: Utopia and Dystopia in​ Stranger Things Omegaverse Fanfiction", thesis submitted to Utrecht University, page 23:
      Early in ​Wicked Game,​ Steve goes into his first-ever rut.
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:rut.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

rut (third-person singular simple present ruts, present participle rutting, simple past and past participle rutted)

  1. (intransitive) To be in the annual rut or mating season.
    Synonyms: blissom, brim, bull, oestruate
  2. (intransitive) To have sexual intercourse.
    Synonyms: do it, get some, have sex; see also Thesaurus:copulate
  3. (transitive, rare) To have sexual intercourse with.
    Synonyms: coitize, go to bed with, sleep with; see also Thesaurus:copulate with
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

a rut on a main road (sense 1)

Probably from Middle English route, from Middle French route (road), from Old French route. See also rutter.

Noun[edit]

rut (plural ruts)

  1. A furrow, groove, or track worn in the ground, as from the passage of many wheels along a road. [from 16th c.]
    Synonyms: groove, furrow
  2. (figuratively) A fixed routine, procedure, line of conduct, thought or feeling. [from 19th c.]
    Synonym: routine
  3. (figuratively) A dull routine.
    Dull job, no interests, no dates. He's really in a rut.
    • 1980, Paul Weller (lyrics and music), “Going Underground”, in Setting Sons, performed by The Jam:
      Some people might say my life is in a rut / I'm quite happy with what I got
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

rut (third-person singular simple present ruts, present participle rutting, simple past and past participle rutted)

  1. (transitive) To make a furrow.
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Central Franconian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • rot (southern Moselle Franconian and Siegerland)

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German rōt.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

rut (masculine rude or ruhe, feminine rut or ruh, comparative ruder or ruher, superlative et rutste)

  1. (Ripuarian, northern Moselle Franconian) red

Usage notes[edit]

  • The inflections with loss of -d- are restricted to westernmost Ripuarian.

See also[edit]

Colors in Central Franconian · Färve (layout · text)
     Wieß, Wies, Weiß      Jries, Greis, Jroo, Groo      Zjwats, Schwats
             Rut, Roeëd; Kérmes, Karmieng              Amber; Brong, Broun, Brung, Broeng              Jäl, Jeël, Jell, Gäl; Oker
             Liem, Lich Jrön              Jrön, Green, Grien, Jreun, Jröng              Minz Jrön; Donkeljrön, Donkerjreun, Donkeljröng
             Turquoise, Turkwaas              Blau (Hellblau, Himmelblau)              Blau, Blauw, Bloo, Bloh (Donkelblau, Donkelbloo)
             Violett; Indiego              Majénta; Lila              Rose, Rosrut

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French rut, ruit, inherited from Latin rugītus. Doublet of rugi, past participle of rugir.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rut m (plural ruts)

  1. rut (sexual excitement)

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Hungarian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

An onomatopoeia.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈrut]
  • Hyphenation: rut
  • Rhymes: -ut

Interjection[edit]

rut

  1. gobble (representation of the sound of a turkey; can be used repetitively)
    • 1893, Kálmán Mikszáth, Az eladó birtok[1]:
      Csak az eperfa alatt sétálgató, felborzolt tollú pulyka kiabálta: rut, rut.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
    • 1954, Lőrinc Szabó, Falusi hangverseny (Village concert)[2]:
      Rút! Rút! Rút! / Föl is, le is út: / mérges Pulyka, te szereted / csak a háborút!
      Gobble! Gobble! Gobble! / Go away: / angry Turkey, only you like / war!
    • xxxx, Csanádi Imre, Hangverseny (Concert)[3]:
      Pulyka mondja: rut, rut, rut! / Aki kapzsi, mindig rút!
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

Vilamovian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German rōt (red, red-haired), from Old High German rōt (red, scarlet, purple-red, brown-red, yellow-red), from Proto-West Germanic *raud, from Proto-Germanic *raudaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁rewdʰ-.

Akin to German rot, Old Saxon rōd, Old Dutch rōd (modern Dutch rood)

Adjective[edit]

rūt

  1. red