herd

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See also: Herd

English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English herde, heerde, heorde, from Old English hierd, heord (herd, flock; keeping, care, custody), from Proto-Germanic *herdō (herd), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱerdʰ- (file, row, herd). Cognate with German Herde, Swedish hjord. Non-Germanic cognates include Albanian herdhe (nest) and Serbo-Croatian krdo.

Noun[edit]

herd (plural herds)

  1. A number of domestic animals assembled together under the watch or ownership of a keeper. [from 11th c.]
    a herd of cattle
    a herd of sheep
    a herd of goats
  2. Any collection of animals gathered or travelling in a company. [from 13th c.]
    • 2007, J. Michael Fay, Ivory Wars: Last Stand in Zakouma, National Geographic (March 2007), 47,
      Zakouma is the last place on Earth where you can see more than a thousand elephants on the move in a single, compact herd.
  3. (now usually derogatory) A crowd, a mass of people; now usually pejorative: a rabble. [from 15th c.]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

herd (third-person singular simple present herds, present participle herding, simple past and past participle herded)

  1. (intransitive) To unite or associate in a herd; to feed or run together, or in company.
    Sheep herd on many hills.
    • 1953, Janice Holt Giles, The Kentuckians:
      The women bunched up in little droves and let their tongues clack, and the men herded together and passed a jug around and, to tell the truth, let their tongues clack too.
    • 1983, Richard Ellis, The Book of Sharks, Knopf, →ISBN, page 167:
      Any predator that preys on animals that herd or school, has to be able to single out one individual to attack.
  2. (transitive) To unite or associate in a herd
  3. (transitive) To manage, care for or guard a herd
    He is employed to herd the goats.
  4. (intransitive) To associate; to ally oneself with, or place oneself among, a group or company.
    1713, Joseph Addison, Cato, published 1712, (please specify the act number in uppercase Roman numerals):
    • I’ll herd among his friends, and seem
      One of the number.
    • 1887, H. Rider Haggard, She: A History of Adventure[1]:
      "[W]hy, I say, oh stranger, dost thou think that I herd here with barbarians lower than the beasts?"
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English herde, from Old English hirde, hierde, from Proto-West Germanic *hirdī, from Proto-Germanic *hirdijaz. Cognate with German Hirte, Swedish herde, Danish hyrde.

Noun[edit]

herd (plural herds)

  1. (now rare) Someone who keeps a group of domestic animals; a herdsman.
    • 2000, Alasdair Grey, The Book of Prefaces, Bloomsbury 2002, page 38:
      Any talent which gives a good new thing to others is a miracle, but commentators have thought it extra miraculous that England's first known poet was an illiterate herd.
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb[edit]

herd (third-person singular simple present herds, present participle herding, simple past and past participle herded)

  1. (intransitive, Scotland) To act as a herdsman or a shepherd.
  2. (transitive) To form or put into a herd.
  3. (transitive) To move or drive a herd.
    I heard the herd of cattle being herded home from a long way away.
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Verb[edit]

herd

  1. imperative of herde

Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *herþ.

Noun[edit]

herd m

  1. hearth

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle High German: hert