parade

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
A band marches in a parade in Denmark.
A parade of geese

Etymology 1[edit]

From French parade (an ostentatious display, a military display), from parer (to beautify, prepare, take pride in) + -ade probably under influence from earlier Italian parata (preparation, a military parade, an ostentatious display) and Latin magnō parātū (with great preparation). Various senses similarly influenced by earlier French and Italian uses. Doublet of pare.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: pə-rād', IPA(key): /pəˈɹeɪd/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪd

Noun[edit]

parade (countable and uncountable, plural parades)

  1. An organized display of a group of people, particularly
    1. (military) Synonym of military parade: A show of troops, an assembly of troops as a show of force, to receive orders, or especially for inspection at set times.
    2. A public procession, especially one commemorating a holiday or special event or (dated) in protest.
      • 1673–4, Duke of Lauderdale, Lauderdale Papers, Vol. III, p. 36:
        They went up with a Parade of 9 or 10 Coaches.
      • 1888, James Bryce, The American Commonwealth, Vol. II, p. 580:
        When a procession is exceptionally large it is called a Parade.
      • 1922, Sinclair Lewis, “[HTTP://WWW.GUTENBERG.ORG/FILES/1156/1156-H/1156-H.HTM CHAPTER 27]”, in Babbitt, New York, N.Y.: Harcourt, Brace and Company, OCLC 844076792:
        The strikers had announced a parade for Tuesday morning, but Colonel Nixon had forbidden it, the newspapers said.
      • 1995, Nancy J. Herman, Deviance, p. 388:
        The author became aware of the term "beadwhore" while viewing a Mardi Gras parade... You can't catch anything with those beadwhores areound. Even cute kids on the shoulders of their fathers can't compete with boobs.
      The Parade of the Marksmen at the Hanover Schützenfest each July is one of the longest regular parades in the world.
    3. (venery, uncommon) Synonym of gaggle: A group of geese when on the move, particularly a line of goslings shepherded by one or more adults.
    4. (venery, uncommon) Synonym of herd: A group of elephants when on the move.
  2. A place reserved for such displays, particularly
    1. (military, now uncommon) Synonym of parade ground: A place specially designated for such displays or for practicing close-order drills.
      • 1704, John Harris, Lexicon Technicum, Vol. I, s.v.:
        Parade, is a Military word, signifying the Place where Troops usually draw together, in order to mount the Guards, or for any other Service.
      • 1844, The Queen's Regulations & Orders for the Army, p. 240:
        When Barracks are occupied by Troops, the Yards and Parades are to be swept, rolled, and kept clean by them.
    2. (dated) Synonym of promenade: A route, street, or square frequented by pedestrians or formerly used for military parades.
      • 1697, William Dampier, A New Voyage round the World, p. 219:
        This Square is calcled the Parade.
      • 1874, Thomas Hardy, Far from the Madding Crowd, Chapter 47:
        ...at no great distance from them, where the shoreline curved round, and formed a long riband of shade upon the horizon, a series of points of yellow light began to start into existence, denoting the spot to be the site of Budmouth, where the lamps were being lighted along the parade.
      • 1905 March 28, Daily Chronicle, p. 4:
        Glasgow's most fashionable Sunday parade, the ‘crawl’ on Great Western-road.
      • 1914, G. K. Chesterton, "The God of the Gongs", The Wisdom of Father Brown, p. 216:
        After walking a mile or two farther, they found that the shore was beginning to be formally embanked, so as to form something like a parade; the ugly lamp-posts became less few and far between and more ornamental, though quite equally ugly.
    3. (uncommon) Synonym of road, used in place names.
      His shop is located in Chester Pde.
  3. The people who make up such a display, particularly
    1. (military, now uncommon) The body of soldiers thus assembled.
    2. The body of promenaders thus assembled.
      • 1722, Daniel Defoe, The History and Remarkable Life of the Truly Honourable Col. Jacque..., p. 126:
        We saw a great Parade or kind of Meeting.
      • 1873, William Black, Princess of Thule, p. 265:
        ‘Did she go into that parade of people?’ said Ingram.
  4. (figuratively) Synonym of show: any similarly orderly or ostentatious display, especially of a variety of people or a series of things paraded around.
    • 1652, Thomas Urquhart, Ecscybalauron (Εκσκυβαλαυρον), p. 282:
      ...the ravishing assault of a well-disciplined diction, in a parade of curiosly-mustered words in their several ranks and files...
    • 1656, Thomas Blount, Glossographia, s.v.:
      Parade (Fr.), an appearance or shew, a bravado or vaunting offer.
    • 1659, Francis Osborne, “Conjectural Paradoxes”, A Miscellany of Sundry Essayes..., p. 92:
      Formes little Different from those of a Gally, to no more Thriving an Intention in reference to the Publick, Then Apothecaries paynt and adorn their Shops which is to delude the Ignorant, and hide from Inspection such Arts as lye more in Parade then Substance.
    • 1661, Abraham Cowley, A Vision Concerning His Late Pretended Highnesse Cromwell the Wicked..., p. 58:
      ...the most virtuous and laudable deed that his whole Life could make any parade of...
    • 1700, Mary Astell, Some Reflections upon Marriage, p. 67:
      What good Conduct does he shew! what Patience exercise! what Subtilty leave untry’d! what Concealment of his Faults! what Parade of his Vertues! what Government of his Passions!
    • 1801, Jonathan Swift, untitled poem, The Works of the Rev. Jonathan Swift, Vol. II, p. 420:
      Be rich, but of your Wealth make no Parade;
      At least, before your Master’s Debts are paid.
    • 1815, Jane Austen, Emma, Vol. I, Ch. 9:
      ... with all his good and agreeable qualities, there was a sort of parade in his speeches which was very apt to incline her to laugh.
    • 1850, Lord Alfred Tennyson, In Memoriam, xxi, 35:
      Another answers, ‘Let him be,
      He loves to make parade of pain.’
    • 1928, Radclyffe Hall, chapter 55, in The Well of Loneliness, OCLC 5359892, OCLC 872643730, book 5, section 2, page 497:
      Under all her parade of gallantry he divined a great weariness of spirit, a great longing to be at peace with the world...
    • 1993, Carol Shields, The Stone Diaries, Ch. 3, p. 85:
      ... he applied himself to his Bible morning and night. Its narratives frankly puzzled him—the parade of bearded kings and prophets, their curious ravings.
    • 2008 November 21, Graham Linehan, The IT Crowd, Season 3, Episode 1:
      Roy: The work was fiiine. There was nothing wrong with the work. But they caught him... He pissed in the sink.
      Jen: Oh. Oh!
      Roy: Yeah...
      Jen: Which sink?
      Roy: All the sinks. Yeah, he basically went on a pee parade around the house.
      Jen: Oh God, I have to fire him.
    • 2011, Alan Hollinghurst, The Stranger’s Child, p. 325:
      ... there was a degree of order in the books, a parade of Loeb classics, archaeology, ancient history.
    The dinner was a parade of courses, each featuring foods more elaborate than the last.
  5. (UK, figuratively, uncommon) A row of shops beside a street.
    • 1968, Roger Kenneth Cox, Retail Site Assessment, p. 15:
      Most new shopping centres... have broken away from the old strip parades which usually face each other across heavy inter-town traffic.
  6. (UK, figuratively, now uncommon) Short for programme parade: a description of the programming schedule formerly announced on the radio and various television channels.
    • 1947 May 2, Radio Times, p. 8:
      Scottish Programme Parade
    • 1948, BBC West, Broadcasting in West:
      Listen to your regional Programme Parade at 8.10 a.m. daily.
Alternative forms[edit]
Hyponyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Hindi: परैड (paraiḍ)
  • Urdu: پریڈ(paraiḍ)
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

parade (third-person singular simple present parades, present participle parading, simple past and past participle paraded)

  1. (intransitive) To take part in a parade, particularly
    1. To assemble for inspection, to receive orders, etc.
    2. To march impressively or ostentatiously.
      No one fights a war in close-order formations any more but officers still love to force their men to parade, coming up with various plausible excuses for their enjoyment of command.
    3. (transitive) To march past.
      After the field show, it is customary to parade the stands before exiting the field.
    4. (transitive) To march through or along.
      • 1817 December, [Jane Austen], chapter IV, in Northanger Abbey; published in Northanger Abbey: And Persuasion. [], volume (please specify |volume=I or II), London: John Murray, [], 1818, OCLC 318384910:
        “What a delightful place Bath is,” said Mrs. Allen as they sat down near the great clock, after parading the room till they were tired;
      • 1849, Currer Bell [pseudonym; Charlotte Brontë], chapter 16, in Shirley. A Tale. [], volume (please specify |volume=I, II, or III), London: Smith, Elder and Co., [], OCLC 84390265:
        At one o’clock the troops were to come in; at two they were to be marshalled; till four they were to parade the parish...
      • 1904 January 29 – October 7, Joseph Conrad, Nostromo: A Tale of the Seaboard, London; New York, N.Y.: Harper & Brothers [], published 1904, OCLC 8754239:
        ... since it was no longer possible for him to parade the streets of the town, and be hailed with respect in the usual haunts of his leisure, this sailor felt himself destitute indeed.
      • 1971, Bessie Head, Maru, p. 92:
        They said nothing, but stared at each other with the horror of people exposed to all the torture of the demons who parade the African continent.
    5. (figuratively) Synonym of promenade: to walk up and down, especially in public in order to show off and be seen by others.
      • 1753, Samuel Richardson, History of Sir Charles Grandison, Vol. V, p. 46:
        The whole family paraded it together.
      • 1868, Louisa May Alcott, Little Women, Chapter 19:
        ... it was her favorite amusement to array herself in the faded brocades, and parade up and down before the long mirror, making stately curtsies, and sweeping her train about with a rustle which delighted her ears.
      • 1929, Dashiell Hammett, The Dain Curse, Ch. 22:
        [...] if you’re going to parade around with that robe hanging open you’re going to get yourself some bronchitis.
      • 1969, Maya Angelou, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, p. 166:
        ... Mrs. Parsons, the principal’s wife, would play the graduation march while the lower-grade graduates paraded down the aisles and took their seats below the platform.
      • 2003, Lionel Shriver, We Need to Talk About Kevin, p. 381:
        Stretcher after stretcher paraded into the lot—I was aghast; there seemed no end to them.
    6. (transitive, figuratively, of vehicles) To move slowly through or among.
    7. (figuratively, of waterfowl) To walk in a row led by one parent, often trailed by the other.
  2. (transitive) To cause to take part in a parade, particularly
    1. To assemble soldiers for inspection, to receive orders, etc.
      • 1847, Herman Melville, Omoo, Ch. 28:
        In a few moments, we were paraded in the frigate’s gangway; the first lieutenant—an elderly yellow-faced officer, in an ill-cut coat and tarnished gold lace—coming up, and frowning upon us.
      • 1965, John Fowles, The Magus, p. 382:
        The men were paraded and briefly addressed by the colonel in my presence...
    2. (figuratively) Synonym of show off: to display or reveal prominently or ostentatiously, especially in a kind of procession.
      They paraded dozens of fashions past the crowd.
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To furnish with a parade or parades.
    • 1889, James John Hissey, A Tour in a Phaeton through the Eastern Counties, p. 191:
      The modern part that faces the sea is... paraded, well lighted, well drained.
Usage notes[edit]

The intransitive senses of parade were sometimes previously used with a dummy itThe lovers paraded it together—although this use is now obsolete.

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From French parade (a parry), from parer (to parry, to defend oneself) + -ade, from Italian parata. Doublet of parry.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

parade (plural parades)

  1. (uncommon) Synonym of parry in both its literal and figurative senses.
    • 1652, Thomas Urquhart, Ecscybalauron (Εκσκυβαλαυρον), p. 228:
      ...in case the adversary after a finda, going to the parade, discover his brest to caveat...
    • 1699, John Locke, Some Thoughts Concerning Education, §94, p. 152:
      [The Tutor] should accustom him to make as much as is possible a true Judgment of Men by those Marks which serve best to shew what they are, and give a Prospect into their Inside, which often shews it self in little Things, especially when they are not in Parade, and upon their Guard.

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French parade, from Middle French parade, from Spanish parada.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

parade f (plural parades, diminutive paradetje n)

  1. A parade; a festive or ceremonial procession.

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

parade

  1. inflection of parader:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Indonesian[edit]

Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch parade, from French parade (show, display, parade, parry, formerly also a halt on horseback), from Spanish parada (a halt, stop, pause, a parade), from parar (to halt, stop, get ready, prepare), from Latin parare (to prepare; to halt, stop, prevent, guard against, etc., dress, trim, adorn).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /paˈradə/
  • Hyphenation: pa‧ra‧dê

Noun[edit]

paradê (first-person possessive paradeku, second-person possessive parademu, third-person possessive paradenya)

  1. parade:
    1. an organized procession consisting of a series of consecutive displays, performances, exhibits, etc. displayed by moving down a street past a crowd of spectators.
    2. (military) an assembling of troops for inspection or to receive orders.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Norman[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

parade f (plural parades)

  1. (Guernsey) parade

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Bokmål Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nb

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French parade (show, display, parade, parry, formerly also a halt on horseback), from Spanish parada (a halt, stop, pause, a parade), from parar (to halt, stop, get ready, prepare), from Latin parare (to prepare, in Medieval Latin and Rom. also to halt, stop, prevent, guard against, etc., also dress, trim, adorn).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

parade m (definite singular paraden, indefinite plural parader, definite plural paradene)

  1. display, exhibition, show
    å sitte på parade
    to be on display
    Synonyms: lit de parade, paradeseng
  2. (military) line-up, especially on solemn occasions
    en flott militær flaggparade
    a great military flag parade
    Synonyms: vaktparade, flaggparade, homseparade
    1. (military) a troop department that meets for inspection or a specific service
    2. (military) parade uniform
    3. (military) punishment attendance at school or military camp
      å få parade
      to receive punishment attendance
    Synonym: paradere
  3. (sports) movement of the weapon to ward off the opponent's chops or bumps
    Synonym: kvartparade
    1. (boxing or wrestling) a movement to fend off the opponent's blows
    2. (ball game) fast averting movement from a goalie
      målvakten reddet ved en lynrask parade
      the goalkeeper saved by a quick parade
  4. (equestrianism) sudden stopping or slowing of a riding horse
    hel parade
    sudden stopping of the horse
    halv parade
    sudden slowing of the horse

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

parade

  1. absolute singular definite and plural form of parad.

Verb[edit]

parade

  1. past tense of para.

Anagrams[edit]