defile

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: defilé, défile, and défilé

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English defilen ‎(to make dirty), alteration (due to Middle English defoulen, defoilen ‎(to trample, abuse)) of Middle English befilen ‎(to defile, make foul), from Old English befȳlan ‎(to befoul, defile), from Proto-Germanic *bi- + *fūlijaną ‎(to defile, make filthy). Cognate with Dutch bevuilen ‎(to defile, soil). More at be-, file, foul.

Verb[edit]

defile ‎(third-person singular simple present defiles, present participle defiling, simple past and past participle defiled)

  1. (transitive) to make impure; to make dirty.
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Earlier defilee, from French défilé, from défiler ‎(to march past), from file ‎(file).

Noun[edit]

defile ‎(plural defiles)

  1. A narrow way or passage, e.g. between mountains.
  2. A single file, such as of soldiers.
  3. The act of defilading a fortress, or of raising the exterior works in order to protect the interior.
Translations[edit]
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See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

defile ‎(third-person singular simple present defiles, present participle defiling, simple past and past participle defiled)

  1. (archaic, intransitive) To march in a single file.
    • 1979, Cormac McCarthy, Suttree, Random House, p.138:
      They defiled down a gully to the water and bunched and jerked their noses at it and came back.
Translations[edit]

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French défilé.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /defǐleː/
  • Hyphenation: de‧fi‧le

Noun[edit]

defìlē m (Cyrillic spelling дефѝле̄)

  1. march-past

Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  • defile” in Hrvatski jezični portal