magno

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See also: Magno, magnó, and magnò

Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin magnus, from Proto-Italic *magnos, from Proto-Indo-European *m̥ǵh₂nós, derived from *méǵh₂s (big; great).

Adjective[edit]

magno (feminine magna, masculine plural magni, feminine plural magne)

  1. (archaic, literary) great, mighty
    Synonym: grande
    • 1321, Dante Alighieri, La divina commedia: Paradiso, Le Monnier, published 2002, Canto XV, lines 49–52, page 273–274:
      E seguì: «Grato e lontano digiuno, ¶ tratto leggendo dal magno volume [] »
      And it continued: "Hunger long and grateful, drawn from the reading of the mighty volume [] "
Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • magno in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb[edit]

magno

  1. (transitive, slang, dialectal, Central and Southern Italy) first-person singular present indicative of magnare

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Adjective[edit]

magnō

  1. inflection of magnus:
    1. dative masculine/neuter singular
    2. ablative masculine/neuter singular

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin magnus. Compare the inherited doublet maño, now disused or archaic.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈmaɡno/, [ˈmaɣ̞.no]

Adjective[edit]

magno (feminine magna, masculine plural magnos, feminine plural magnas)

  1. great

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Further reading[edit]