mango

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Mango, mangó, manĝo, and mangō

English[edit]

mangoes (fruit)
English Wikipedia has an article on:
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Etymology[edit]

From Portuguese manga, from Malay mangga, from Malayalam മാങ്ങ (māṅṅa) from മാവ് (māvŭ, mango species) + കായ (kāya, unripe fruit).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈmæŋɡəʊ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈmæŋɡoʊ/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æŋɡəʊ

Noun[edit]

mango (countable and uncountable, plural mangoes or mangos)

  1. A tropical Asian fruit tree, Mangifera indica.
    • 1980, Bruce Chatwin, The Viceroy of Ouidah, page 146:
      On the hot days, he would lie in the shade of a mango and let little Eugenia clamber over his belly and tug at his beard.
  2. The fruit of the mango tree.
    • 1738, October–November, Hans Sloan, Philosophical Transactions, volume 40, number 450, “VI. his Answer to the Marquis de Caumont's Letter, concerning this Stone”, translated from the Latin by Thomas Stack, Royal Society (1741), page 376:
      And I have one [bezoar] form'd round the Stone of that great Plum, which comes pickled from thence, and is called Mango.
  3. A pickled vegetable or fruit with a spicy stuffing; a vegetable or fruit which has been mangoed.
    • 2004, Elizabeth E. Lea, William Woys Weaver, A Quaker Woman's Cookbook: The Domestic Cookery of Elizabeth Ellicott Lea, page 335:
      In Pennsylvania and western Maryland, mangoes were generally made with green bell peppers.
  4. (US, chiefly southern Midwestern US, dated) A green bell pepper suitable for pickling.
    • 1879, Pennsylvania State Board of Agriculture, Agriculture of Pennsylvania, page 222:
      Mango peppers by the dozen, if owned by the careful housewife, would gladden the appetite or disposition of any epicure or scold.
    • 1896, Ohio State Board of Agriculture, Annual Report, page 154:
      Best mango peppers
    • 1943, August 9, “Mary Adgate”, in Stuffed Mangoes[1], Lima, Ohio, page 5:
      Cut tops from mangoes; remove seeds.
    • 2000, Allan A. Metcalf, How We Talk: American Regional English Today, page 41:
      Finally, although both the South and North Midlands are not known for their tropical climate, that's where mangoes grow. These aren't the tropical fruit, though, but what are elsewhere called green peppers.
  5. A type of muskmelon, Cucumis melo.
  6. Any of various hummingbirds of the genus Anthracothorax.
  7. A yellow-orange color, like that of mango flesh.
    mango colour:  

Hypernyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb[edit]

mango (third-person singular simple present mangoes, present participle mangoing, simple past and past participle mangoed)

  1. (uncommon) To stuff and pickle (a fruit).
    • 1870, Hannah Mary Peterson, The Young Wife's Cook Book, page 444:
      Although any melon may be used before it is quite ripe, yet there is a particular sort for this purpose, which the gardeners know, and should be mangoed soon after they are gathered.
    • 1989, William Woys Weaver, America eats: forms of edible folk art:
      In an effort to reproduce the pickle, English cooks took to "mangoing" all sorts of substitutes, from cucumbers to unripe peaches. Americans, however, preferred baby musk melons, or, in areas where they did not grow well, bell peppers.
    • 2008, Beverly Ellen Schoonmaker Alfeld, Pickles To Relish, →ISBN, page 66:
      For this cookbook, I made mangoed peppers that were not stuffed with cabbage, but stuffed with green and red tomatoes and onions.

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Afar[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Ultimately from Malay mangga, from Malayalam മാങ്ങ (māṅṅa).

Noun[edit]

mangó f

  1. mango (fruit)
  2. mango (plant)
  3. mango juice

References[edit]

  • Mohamed Hassan Kamil (2015) L’afar: description grammaticale d’une langue couchitique (Djibouti, Erythrée et Ethiopie)[2], Paris: Université Sorbonne Paris Cité (doctoral thesis).

Antillean Creole[edit]

Noun[edit]

mango

  1. mango

Chichewa[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mangó class 6

  1. mango (fruit)
  2. plural of bango

Synonyms[edit]


Cornish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English mango.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Revived Middle Cornish) IPA(key): [ˈmaŋɡɔ]
  • (Revived Late Cornish) IPA(key): [ˈmæŋɡɔ]

Noun[edit]

mango m (plural mangos)

  1. mango

Mutation[edit]


Czech[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English mango, from Portuguese manga, from Malay mangga, from Tamil மாங்காய் (māṅkāy) from மா (, mango species) + காய் (kāy, unripe fruit).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mango n

  1. mango (the fruit of the mango tree)

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English mango, from Portuguese manga, from Malay mangga, from Tamil மாங்காய் (māṅkāy), from மா (, mango species) + காய் (kāy, unripe fruit).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈmɑŋ.ɡoː/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: man‧go

Noun[edit]

mango m (plural mango's, diminutive mangootje n)

  1. (Netherlands, Belgium) mango
    Synonyms: manga, manja
  2. (Netherlands, Belgium) mango tree, Mangifera indica

Derived terms[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Esperanto Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia eo

Etymology[edit]

From English mango, from Portuguese manga, from Malay mangga, from Tamil மாங்காய் (māṅkāy) from மா (, mango species) + காய் (kāy, unripe fruit).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mango (accusative singular mangon, plural mangoj, accusative plural mangojn)

  1. mango (fruit)

Derived terms[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈmɑŋːo/, [ˈmɑŋːo̞]
  • Rhymes: -ɑŋːo
  • Syllabification: man‧go

Etymology 1[edit]

From English mango, from Portuguese manga, from Malay mangga, from Malayalam മാങ്ങ (māṅṅa).

Noun[edit]

mango

  1. mango (fruit)
Declension[edit]
Inflection of mango (Kotus type 1/valo, no gradation)
nominative mango mangot
genitive mangon mangojen
partitive mangoa mangoja
illative mangoon mangoihin
singular plural
nominative mango mangot
accusative nom. mango mangot
gen. mangon
genitive mangon mangojen
partitive mangoa mangoja
inessive mangossa mangoissa
elative mangosta mangoista
illative mangoon mangoihin
adessive mangolla mangoilla
ablative mangolta mangoilta
allative mangolle mangoille
essive mangona mangoina
translative mangoksi mangoiksi
instructive mangoin
abessive mangotta mangoitta
comitative mangoineen
Possessive forms of mango (type valo)
possessor singular plural
1st person mangoni mangomme
2nd person mangosi mangonne
3rd person mangonsa

Etymology 2[edit]

From French mangue.

Noun[edit]

mango

  1. long-nosed kusimanse, common kusimanse, cusimanse (Crossarchus obscurus)
    Synonym: kusimanse
Declension[edit]
Inflection of mango (Kotus type 1/valo, no gradation)
nominative mango mangot
genitive mangon mangojen
partitive mangoa mangoja
illative mangoon mangoihin
singular plural
nominative mango mangot
accusative nom. mango mangot
gen. mangon
genitive mangon mangojen
partitive mangoa mangoja
inessive mangossa mangoissa
elative mangosta mangoista
illative mangoon mangoihin
adessive mangolla mangoilla
ablative mangolta mangoilta
allative mangolle mangoille
essive mangona mangoina
translative mangoksi mangoiksi
instructive mangoin
abessive mangotta mangoitta
comitative mangoineen
Possessive forms of mango (type valo)
possessor singular plural
1st person mangoni mangomme
2nd person mangosi mangonne
3rd person mangonsa

Galician[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

mango m (plural mangos)

  1. handle
    Synonym: cabo

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

mango

  1. First-person singular (eu) present indicative of mangar

Hiligaynon[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mangô

  1. (derogatory) Idiot.

Adjective[edit]

mangô

  1. Stupid, foolish.

Usage notes[edit]

  • The word can sound friendly and affectionate between close people.

See also[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English mango, from Portuguese manga, from Malay mangga, from Tamil மாங்காய் (māṅkāy) from மா (, mango species) + காய் (kāy, unripe fruit).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mango m (plural manghi)

  1. mango

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mangō m (genitive mangōnis); third declension

  1. dealer, monger (especially of slaves)

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative mangō mangōnēs
Genitive mangōnis mangōnum
Dative mangōnī mangōnibus
Accusative mangōnem mangōnēs
Ablative mangōne mangōnibus
Vocative mangō mangōnēs

References[edit]


Latvian[edit]

Wikipedia-logo.png
 mango on Latvian Wikipedia
Mango (1)
Mango (2)

Etymology[edit]

Via other European languages, see etymology at English mango.

Pronunciation[edit]

(file)

Noun[edit]

mango m (invariable)

  1. tree of the genus Mangifera with aromatic, sweet fruits
    mango ir viens no tropu svarīgākajiem augļu kokiemthe mango is one of the most important tropical fruit trees
  2. mango fruit (the fruit of this tree)
    mango ir tropu koku augļithe mango is a tropical tree fruit
    mēs pasūtām mango sulu ar leduwe ordered mango juice with ice

Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English mango, from Portuguese manga, from Malay mangga, from Tamil மாங்காய் (māṅkāy), from மா (, mango species) + காய் (kāy, unripe fruit).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mango n (indeclinable)

  1. mango (fruit and tree)

Spanish[edit]

un mango de espada

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈmanɡo/, [ˈmãŋɡo]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Vulgar Latin manicus, from Latin manus (hand).

Noun[edit]

mango m (plural mangos)

  1. handle (part of an object which is held in the hand)
    • 2011, Estándar de milady: barbero profesional, 5th edition, Milady, page 353:
      Sostenga el mango de la navaja entre los dedos anular y meñique, []
      Hold the razor’s handle between your ring finger and little finger, []

See also[edit]

un mango

Etymology 2[edit]

From English mango, from Portuguese manga, from Malay mangga, from Tamil மாங்காய் (māṅkāy) from மா (, mango species) + காய் (kāy, unripe fruit).

Noun[edit]

mango m (plural mangos)

  1. mango (fruit and tree)
  2. (Argentina, Uruguay, lunfardo, colloquial) cash, dough (money)

Descendants[edit]

  • Tetelcingo Nahuatl: mönco

Etymology 3[edit]

Verb[edit]

mango

  1. First-person singular (yo) present indicative form of mangar.

Further reading[edit]


Swahili[edit]

Noun[edit]

mango (n class, plural mango)

  1. solid

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Portuguese manga, from Malay mangga, from Tamil மாங்காய் (māṅkāy).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mango c

  1. mango

Declension[edit]

Declension of mango 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative mango mangon mangor, mangoer mangorna, mangoernas
Genitive mangos mangons mangors, mangoers mangornas, mangoernas

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English mango.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mango m (plural mangos)

  1. mango

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
mango fango unchanged unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.