monger

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See also: Monger

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English mongere, mangere, from Old English mangere (merchant, trader, dealer), from Old English mangian (to trade, to traffic) from Proto-Germanic *mangōną, from Latin mangō (dealer, trader), perhaps from Ancient Greek μάγγανον (mánganon, contrivance, means of enchantment), from Proto-Indo-European *mang- (to embellish, dress, trim).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

monger (plural mongers)

  1. (chiefly in combination) A dealer in a specific commodity.
    costermonger, fishmonger, ironmonger
    • 2005, Los Angeles Magazine (volume 50, number 11, page 111)
      For the freshest wild catch, ask your monger when the fish are running.
  2. (in combination) A person promoting something undesirable.
    warmonger, sleazemonger, scaremonger
  3. A small sea vessel.
    • 1790, Wilson Lt. Robert (RN), The Seaman's Manual
      monger: a small sea-vessel used by fishermen.
  4. Clipping of whoremonger.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

monger (third-person singular simple present mongers, present participle mongering, simple past and past participle mongered)

  1. (transitive, Britain) To sell or peddle something
  2. (transitive) To promote something undesirable.
    • 2019 April 25, Samanth Subramanian, “Hand dryers v paper towels: the surprisingly dirty fight for the right to dry your hands”, in The Guardian[1]:
      Once these fears have been mongered, their spread is irresistible.

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]