morgen

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See also: Morgen

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch morgen and German Morgen, both literally "morning", probably originally indicated the amount of land that can be ploughed by a team of oxen in a morning. Doublet of morn.

Noun[edit]

morgen (plural morgen or morgens)

  1. (chiefly historical) A unit of measurement of land in the Netherlands and the Dutch colonies and parts of the United States, where it was equivalent to about two acres; and in Denmark, Norway, and Germany, where it was equivalent to about two-thirds of an acre. Now used informally in Germany to mean one quarter of a hectare. [from 17th c.]
    • 1969, Doris Lessing, The Four-Gated City, 1993 edition, HarperCollins, page 68:
      ‘All my life spent hating a poor little tyrant on a few morgen of poor soil, and he'd never known anything else.’

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse morginn, morgunn, from Proto-Germanic *murganaz, from Proto-Indo-European *mr̥Hko (to blink, twinkle). Compare Norwegian Bokmål morgen, Swedish morgon, Icelandic morgunn, English morn, morrow, Low German Morgen, West Frisian moarn, Dutch morgen, German Morgen.

Noun[edit]

morgen c

  1. morning (the part of the day after midnight and before midday)

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch morgen, from Old Dutch morgan, from Proto-Germanic *murganaz, from Proto-Indo-European *mr̥Hko (to blink, twinkle). Compare Low German Morgen, German Morgen, West Frisian moarn, English morn, morrow, Danish morgen, Swedish morgon.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈmɔrɣə(n)/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: mor‧gen
  • Rhymes: -ɔrɣən

Adverb[edit]

morgen

  1. tomorrow

Descendants[edit]

  • Afrikaans: môre

Noun[edit]

morgen m (plural morgens, diminutive morgentje n)

  1. morning
    Synonym: ochtend

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Interjection[edit]

morgen

  1. Clipping of goedemorgen.

Alternative forms[edit]

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German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈmɔrɡən/, [ˈmɔʁ-], [ˈmɔɐ̯-], [ˈmɔː-], [-ɡən], [-ɡŋ̍]
  • IPA(key): /mɔrŋ/, /mɔrjən/ (colloquial variants)
  • (file)

Adverb[edit]

morgen

  1. tomorrow

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse morginn, morgunn, from Proto-Germanic *murganaz, from Proto-Indo-European *mr̥Hko (to blink, twinkle). Compare Danish morgen, Swedish morgon, Icelandic morgunn, English morn, morrow, Dutch morgen, German Morgen.

Pronunciation[edit]

IPA(key): /ˈmɔːrˌən/, [ˈmɔːˌɳ̍]

Noun[edit]

morgen m (definite singular morgenen, indefinite plural morgener, definite plural morgenene)

  1. morning (the part of the day after midnight and before midday)

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]


Old English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *murganaz, from a pre-Germanic *mr̥kéno ~ *mr̥kóno, from Proto-Indo-European *mr̥Hko (to blink, twinkle). Cognate with Old Frisian morgen, Old Saxon morgan, Old Dutch morgan, Old High German morgan, Old Norse morgunn. Compare also (from the alternative form *murginaz) Old Norse myrginn and Gothic 𐌼𐌰𐌿𐍂𐌲𐌹𐌽𐍃 (maurgins).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈmor.ɡen/, [ˈmorˠ.ɣen]

Noun[edit]

morgen m

  1. morning
    on morgen
    in the morning
  2. morrow, the next day
    morgen
    tomorrow

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]