morgen

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See also: Morgen

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch morgen and German Morgen, both literally "morning", probably originally indicated the amount of land that can be ploughed by a team of oxen in a morning.

Noun[edit]

morgen (plural morgen or morgens)

  1. (chiefly historical) A unit of measurement of land in the Netherlands and the Dutch colonies and parts of the United States, where it was equivalent two about two acres; and in Denmark, Norway, and Germany, where it was equivalent to about two-thirds of an acre. Now used informally in Germany to mean one quarter of a hectare. [from 17th c.]
    • 1969, Doris Lessing, The Four-Gated City, 1993 edition, HarperCollins, page 68:
      ‘All my life spent hating a poor little tyrant on a few morgen of poor soil, and he'd never known anything else.’

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse morginn, morgunn, from Proto-Germanic *murganaz, from Proto-Indo-European *mr̥Hko (to blink, twinkle). Compare Norwegian Bokmål morgen, Swedish morgon, Icelandic morgunn, English morn, morrow, Low German Morgen, West Frisian moarn, Dutch morgen, German Morgen.

Noun[edit]

morgen c

  1. morning (the part of the day after midnight and before midday)

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch morgen, from Old Dutch morgan, from Proto-Germanic *murganaz, from Proto-Indo-European *mr̥Hko (to blink, twinkle). Compare Low German Morgen, German Morgen, West Frisian moarn, English morn, morrow, Danish morgen, Swedish morgon.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈmɔrɣə(n)/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: mor‧gen
  • Rhymes: -ɔrɣən

Adverb[edit]

morgen

  1. tomorrow

Noun[edit]

morgen m (plural morgens, diminutive morgentje n)

  1. morning

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German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈmɔʁɡən/, /ˈmɔɐ̯ɡŋ̩/
  • (file)

Adverb[edit]

morgen

  1. tomorrow

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse morginn, morgunn, from Proto-Germanic *murganaz, from Proto-Indo-European *mr̥Hko (to blink, twinkle). Compare Danish morgen, Swedish morgon, Icelandic morgunn, English morn, morrow, Dutch morgen, German Morgen.

Pronunciation[edit]

IPA(key): /ˈmɔːrˌən/, [ˈmɔːˌɳ̍]

Noun[edit]

morgen m (definite singular morgenen, indefinite plural morgener, definite plural morgenene)

  1. morning (the part of the day after midnight and before midday)

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Old English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *murganaz, from a pre-Germanic *mr̥kéno, *mr̥kóno, from Proto-Indo-European *mr̥Hko (to blink, twinkle). Cognate with Old Saxon morgan (Low German Morgen and Morrn or Morren), West Frisian moarn, Dutch morgen, Old High German morgan (German Morgen), Old Norse morghon (Danish morgen, Swedish morgon), Old Norse morginn, morgunn; compare also (from a variant Germanic base) Old Norse myrginn, Gothic 𐌼𐌰𐌿𐍂𐌲𐌹𐌽𐍃 (maurgins).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈmorɡen/, [ˈmorɣen]

Noun[edit]

morgen m

  1. Morning
    Gōdne morgen!
    Good morning!
    on morgen
    in the morning
    Ġiestranmorgen iċ āwōc of þām seldsumestan swefne.
    Yesterday morning I awoke from the strangest dream.
  2. Morrow, the next day
    morgen
    tomorrow

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