sell

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English sellen, from Old English sellan (give; give up for money), from Proto-West Germanic *salljan, from Proto-Germanic *saljaną, from Proto-Indo-European *selh₁-. Compare Danish sælge, Swedish sälja, Icelandic selja.

Verb[edit]

sell (third-person singular simple present sells, present participle selling, simple past and past participle sold)

  1. (transitive, intransitive, ditransitive) To transfer goods or provide services in exchange for money.
    I'll sell you all three for a hundred dollars.
    Sorry, I'm not prepared to sell.
    Synonym: peddle
  2. (ergative) To be sold.
    This old stock will never sell.
    The corn sold for a good price.
  3. To promote a product or service.
    • 2016, "The Fetal Kick Catalyst", The Big Bang Theory
      Howard: You're gonna feel terrible when I'm in a wheelchair. Which, by the way, would fit easily in the back of this award-winning minivan.
      Bernadette: Fine, we'll go to the E.R. Just stop selling me on the van.
      Howard: You're right. It sells itself.
  4. To promote a particular viewpoint.
    My boss is very old-fashioned and I'm having a lot of trouble selling the idea of working at home occasionally.
  5. To betray for money or other things.
  6. (slang) To trick, cheat, or manipulate someone.
    • 1605 (first performance), Benjamin Jonson [i.e., Ben Jonson], “Volpone, or The Foxe. A Comœdie. []”, in The Workes of Ben Jonson (First Folio), London: [] Will[iam] Stansby, published 1616, OCLC 960101342:
      Then weaues
      Other crosse-plots
      New tricks for safety, are sought;
      They thriue: When, bold,
      Each tempt's th'other againe, and all are sold.
    • 1884, Mark Twain, chapter XXIII, in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn:
      House was jammed again that night, and we sold this crowd the same way.
    • 2011 January 12, Saj Chowdhury, “Blackpool 2-1 Liverpool”, in BBC:
      Raul Meireles was the victim of the home side's hustling on this occasion giving the ball away to the impressive David Vaughan who slipped in Taylor-Fletcher. The striker sold Daniel Agger with the best dummy of the night before placing his shot past keeper Pepe Reina.
  7. (professional wrestling, slang) To pretend that an opponent's blows or maneuvers are causing legitimate injury; to act.
  8. (reflexive, euphemistic) To work as a prostitute.
    Synonyms: sell one's body, turn tricks; see also Thesaurus:prostitute oneself
Antonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Chinese Pidgin English: sellum, 些林
  • Sranan Tongo: seri
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Noun[edit]

sell (plural sells)

  1. An act of selling.
    This is going to be a tough sell.
  2. An easy task.
  3. (colloquial, dated) An imposition, a cheat; a hoax; a disappointment; anything occasioning a loss of pride or dignity.

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From French selle, from Latin sella.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

sell (plural sells)

  1. (obsolete) A seat or stool.
  2. (archaic) A saddle.

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old Saxon seill or Old Norse seil. Cognate with Dutch zeel (rope), German Seil (rope).

Noun[edit]

sell (plural sells)

  1. (regional, obsolete) A rope (usually for tying up cattle, but can also mean any sort of rope).
    He picked up the sell from the straw-strewn barn-floor, snelly sneaked up behind her and sleekly slung it around her swire while scryingː "dee, dee ye fooking quhoreǃ".
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Breton[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sell m

  1. look, glance

Chinese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English sell.

Pronunciation[edit]


Verb[edit]

sell

  1. (Hong Kong Cantonese) to sell; to promote services or products; to promote a viewpoint

See also[edit]

References[edit]


Pennsylvania German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Cognate to German selbig (the same (one)).

Pronoun[edit]

sell

  1. that one

Determiner[edit]

sell

  1. that
    • 1954, Albert F. Buffington, A Pennsylvania German grammar, pages 32 and 81:
      sell Haus datt driwwe
      that house over there
      []
      In sellem alde Glaawe maag en bissel Waahret schtecke.
      In that old belief there may be a bit of truth.
    • For quotations using this term, see Citations:sell.

Inflection[edit]

masculine feminine neuter plural
nominative
and
accusative
seller selle,
selli
sell selle,
selli
dative sellem,
sem
sellere,
sellre,
seller
sellem,
sem
selle

References[edit]

  • Earl C Haag, Pennsylvania German Reader and Grammar (2010), page 204

Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English sellan.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

sell (third-person singular simple present sells, present participle sellin, simple past sellt or sauld, past participle sellt or sauld)

  1. To sell.

Westrobothnian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse sil, a word also recorded in Norway as sel, in Sweden as silder, sälder, standard Swedish sel, from the root of Old Norse seinn and síð.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sĕll n (definite singular sellä, definite plural sella or selja)

  1. pool, calm water (occurring in the course of a stream)
    sellä gjär ’n mil langt
    The calm water at that place stretches for a mile.