gai

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See also: Gai, gái, gài, gãi, gāi, gǎi, and ga'i

Basque[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Of unknown origin. Probably from the suffix -gai, and not the other way round.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • IPA(key): /ɡai̯/ [ɡai̯]
  • Rhymes: -ai̯
  • Hyphenation: gai

Noun[edit]

gai inan

  1. material
  2. matter, stuff
  3. topic, subject

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ gai” in Etymological Dictionary of Basque by R. L. Trask, sussex.ac.uk

Further reading[edit]

  • "gai" in Euskaltzaindiaren Hiztegia [Dictionary of the Basque Academy], euskaltzaindia.eus
  • gai” in Orotariko Euskal Hiztegia [General Basque Dictionary], euskaltzaindia.eus

Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

This entry needs an audio pronunciation. If you are a native speaker with a microphone, please record this word. The recorded pronunciation will appear here when it's ready.

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Occitan gai. Compare Sicilian javiu.

Adjective[edit]

gai (feminine gaia, masculine plural gais, feminine plural gaies)

  1. gay, merry
    Synonyms: alegre, festiu
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from English gay.

Adjective[edit]

gai m or f (masculine and feminine plural gais)

  1. gay, homosexual

Noun[edit]

gai m (plural gais)

  1. gay man

Further reading[edit]

Cebuano[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Shortening.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: ga‧i

Verb[edit]

gai

  1. Short for tagai.

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French gai, from Old Occitan gai, from Gothic *𐌲𐌰𐌷𐌴𐌹𐍃 (*gaheis, impetuous);[1] or from Frankish *gāhi (fast, sudden, impetuous), Frankish *wāhi (pretty),[2] both from Proto-Germanic *ganhuz (lively, fast, quick); or (per Liberman, Chance, Meier) from Latin vagus (wandering, inconstant, flighty), with *[w] → [g] as in French gaine.[3] Doublet of vague in that case.

Cognate with English gay and Italian gaio.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

gai (feminine gaie, masculine plural gais, feminine plural gaies)

  1. cheerful; merry
  2. gay; homosexual

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Louisiana Creole:

References[edit]

  1. ^ Picoche, Jacqueline; Jean-Claude Rolland (2009), “gai”, in Dictionnaire étymologique du français (in French), Paris: Dictionnaires Le Robert
  2. ^ Dauzat, Albert; Jean Dubois, Henri Mitterand (1964) Nouveau dictionnaire étymologique (in French), Paris: Librairie Larousse
  3. ^ http://blog.oup.com/2012/02/word-origin-roots-gay/

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Irish[edit]

Noun[edit]

gai m (genitive singular gai, nominative plural gaethe)

  1. Obsolete spelling of gae (spear, dart; ray)

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
gai ghai ngai
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

gai

  1. masculine plural of gaio

Anagrams[edit]

Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

gai

  1. Rōmaji transcription of がい

Mandarin[edit]

Romanization[edit]

gai

  1. Nonstandard spelling of gāi.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of gǎi.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of gài.

Usage notes[edit]

  • Transcriptions of Mandarin into the Latin script often do not distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without indication of tone.

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan gai.

Adjective[edit]

gai m (oblique and nominative feminine singular gaie)

  1. happy; cheerful; gay

Descendants[edit]

Old Galician-Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Probably from Latin gaudium (joy), as borrowed from Old Occitan gai;[1] alternatively of Germanic origin. Cognate with English gay and Italian gaio.

Adjective[edit]

gai

  1. happy; joyous
    • late 13rd century - early 14th century, Fernando Esquio, A un frade dizem escarallado:
      Cuid'eu que gai é, de piss'arreitado
      I believe he gets happy when his dick's erect

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Joan Coromines; José A. Pascual (1983–1991), “gayo”, in Diccionario crítico etimológico castellano e hispánico (in Spanish), Madrid: Gredos

Old Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Perhaps of Germanic origin and from Frankish *gahi, from Proto-Germanic *ganhuz (quick, lively, fast).

Adjective[edit]

gai m or f (plural gais)

  1. happy; joyous
    • c. 1145, Bernard de Ventadour, Lo gens tems de pascor:
      Per que tuih amador
      Son gai e chantador
      For all the lovers
      are joyous and full of song

Descendants[edit]

Papiamentu[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Portuguese galo and Spanish gallo.

Noun[edit]

gai

  1. rooster

Rohingya[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

Noun[edit]

gai

  1. cow

Vietnamese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Vietic *t-keː. Cognate with Arem takeː ("horn"), Proto-Bahnaric *ʔəkɛː (whence Bahnar ake/hơke) and Proto-Katuic *kii, *ʔakii (whence Pacoh ki (horn on nose, single tusk of rhino)).

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (North Central Vietnam) cây

Noun[edit]

(classifier cái) gai (, , 𣘃)

  1. hemp-nettle
  2. thorn
  3. prickle
  4. (Central Vietnam) pineapple
See also[edit]
Derived terms

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Vietic *-keː (ramie).

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (North Central Vietnam) cây

Noun[edit]

(classifier cây) gai (𦃮)

  1. ramie

Anagrams[edit]

West Makian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

gai

  1. (stative) to be dead

Conjugation[edit]

Conjugation of gai (stative verb)
singular plural
inclusive exclusive
1st person tigai migai agai
2nd person nigai figai
3rd person inanimate igai digai
animate magai
imperative —, gai —, gai

Alternative forms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

  • fagei (to kill (of non-humans))
  • magei (dead, to die)

References[edit]

  • Dick Teljeur (1982) Short Wordlists from South Halmahera, Kayoa, Makian, Ternate, Tidore, and Bacan[1], Pacific linguistics
  • James Collins (1982) Further Notes Towards a West Makian Vocabulary[2], Pacific linguistics

Yola[edit]

Adjective[edit]

gai

  1. Alternative form of gaaye
    • 1867, “DR. RUSSELL ON THE INHABITANTS AND DIALECT OF THE BARONY OF FORTH”, in APPENDIX:
      Gai Gaffort,
      Gay Gifford.

References[edit]

  • Jacob Poole (d. 1827) (before 1828), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, published 1867, page 126

Zhuang[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

This entry needs an audio pronunciation. If you are a native speaker with a microphone, please record this word. The recorded pronunciation will appear here when it's ready.

Etymology 1[edit]

From Chinese (MC kea|keaj, “street”). Cognate with Bouyei gaail. Compare Cantonese (gaai1).

Noun[edit]

gai (Sawndip form , 1957–1982 spelling gai)

  1. street

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Tai *p.qaːjᴬ (to sell). Cognate with Thai ขาย (kǎai), Northern Thai ᨡᩣ᩠ᨿ, Lao ຂາຍ (khāi), ᦃᦻ (ẋaay), Tai Dam ꪄꪱꪥ, Shan ၶၢႆ (khǎai), Ahom 𑜁𑜩 (khay), Bouyei gaail. Compare Proto-Kam-Sui *kwe¹ (to sell) (whence Sui beel).

Verb[edit]

gai (Sawndip forms 𰷔 or ⿰改賣 or ⿰賣亥 or or or or 𬻦 or ⿱夫⿰丿丨 or ⿰出卖 or ⿰卖该 or ⿲丶开丶, 1957–1982 spelling gai)

  1. to sell
    Synonym: siu
    Antonym: cawx
Derived terms[edit]