ros

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Catalan[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Occitan (compare Occitan ros), from Latin russus (compare French roux, Spanish rojo, Italian rosso, Romanian roșu), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₁rewdʰ-.

Adjective[edit]

ros (feminine rossa, masculine plural rossos, feminine plural rosses)

  1. blond
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin rōs, used as a neuter. Compare the form rou.

Noun[edit]

ros m (plural rosos)

  1. (dialectal, archaic) dew
Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Named after general Ros Olano.

Noun[edit]

ros m (plural rosos)

  1. A piqued cap.

Further reading[edit]


Cornish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Brythonic *rrod, from Proto-Celtic *rotos, from Proto-Indo-European *Hróth₂os.

Noun[edit]

ros f (plural rosow)

  1. A wheel.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Brythonic *rros, from Proto-Celtic *ɸrossos.

Noun[edit]

ros f (plural rosyow)

  1. A heathland.

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

ros f (singulative rosen)

  1. roses

Danish[edit]

Verb[edit]

ros

  1. imperative of rose

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch ros, from Old Dutch ros, hors, from Proto-West Germanic *hross, from Proto-Germanic *hrussą (horse), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱers- (to run). Doublet of kar.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

ros n (plural rossen, diminutive rosje n)

  1. A horse.
    Synonym: paard
  2. A steed.
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Afrikaans: ros

Etymology 2[edit]

Adjective[edit]

ros (comparative rosser, superlative meest ros or rost)

  1. of an impure red colour
    de rosse buurt
    the red-light district
  2. ginger, red-haired.
Inflection[edit]
Inflection of ros
uninflected ros
inflected rosse
comparative rosser
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial ros rosser het rost
het roste
indefinite m./f. sing. rosse rossere roste
n. sing. ros rosser roste
plural rosse rossere roste
definite rosse rossere roste
partitive ros rossers
Derived terms[edit]

Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin russus.

Adjective[edit]

ros

  1. red

Derived terms[edit]


Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Irish ros (linseed).

Noun[edit]

ros m (genitive singular rois)

  1. A linseed, flaxseed.
    Synonym: ros lín
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Irish ros (wood, promontory), from Proto-Celtic *ɸrossos, from Proto-Indo-European *pro- (before) + *steh₂- (to stand).

Noun[edit]

ros m (genitive singular rosa, nominative plural rosa)

  1. A wood, wooded headland.
    Synonym: coill
  2. (geography) A headland, promontory.
    Synonyms: rinn, scoth, léim
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
ros not applicable not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *h₁roseh₂. Cognate with Sanskrit रसा (rásā, moisture, humidity), Ancient Greek ἐξεράω (exeráō, pour out), Lithuanian rasà (dew).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rōs m (genitive rōris); third declension

  1. The dew.
  2. A moisture.

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative rōs rōrēs
Genitive rōris rōrum
Dative rōrī rōribus
Accusative rōrem rōrēs
Ablative rōre rōribus
Vocative rōs rōrēs

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • ros in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • ros in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • ros in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)

Lower Sorbian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

ros

  1. second-person singular imperative of rosć

Mauritian Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French roche

Noun[edit]

ros

  1. A rock, stone.

References[edit]

  • Baker, Philip & Hookoomsing, Vinesh Y. 1987. Dictionnaire de créole mauricien. Morisyen – English – Français

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

ros

  1. plural of ro (roe deer)

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

ros

  1. Alternative form of rosen (to boast)

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Verb[edit]

ros

  1. passive form of ro

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From the verb rosa (to praise), from Old Norse hrósa. Prior to the spelling reform of 1959, this noun was considered grammatically feminine or neuter. The revision made non-standard the definite singular forms rosa, rosi, and roset.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ros m (definite singular rosen, uncountable)

  1. praise
    • 1875, Blix, Elias, “Med Jesus”, in Nokre Salmar, 3rd edition, page 25:
      Det er mi høgste Æra, // det er mi største Ros // hans Fylgjesvein at vera // og vandra i hans Ljos.
      It is my highest honour, // it is my highest praise: // to be a His disciple // and wander in His light.
    • 1992, Ruset, Arne, Den svarte kista, pages 85-86:
      Sophies Minde vart flau av all rosen, og gav noko nebbete uttrykk for at no heldt det lenge.
      Sophies Minde got embarrassed by all the praise, and expressed somewhat snarkily that this would be enough for a good while.

Verb[edit]

ros

  1. imperative of rosa

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse rǫs, plural of ras n, whence also the more common doublet of ras.

Alternative forms[edit]

  • ròs (alternative spelling)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ros f (definite singular rosa, indefinite plural roser, definite plural rosene)

  1. an avalanche, a landslide, a slip
    Synonym: skred
  2. cavity left in place of the masses displaced by such an avalanche, landslide or other
  3. a scratch in the skin

Etymology 3[edit]

mann med ros i andletet

After German Rose, from Old High German rōsa, from Latin rosa. Doublet of rose.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ros f (definite singular rosa, uncountable)

  1. (medicine) erysipelas
    Synonym: (more common) rosen

References[edit]


Old Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *ɸrossos, from Proto-Indo-European *pro- (before) + *steh₂- (to stand). The same construction as Sanskrit प्रस्थ (prastha, plateau), but probably coined separately in the two languages.[1]

Noun[edit]

ros m (genitive ruis, nominative plural ruis)

  1. A promontory.
  2. A wood.
    • c. 900, Sanas Cormaic, from the Yellow Book of Lecan, Corm. Y 1079
      ross .i. trēde fordingair .i. ros fidbuide, []
      wood, that is, a triad of meanings, that is, a wood of yellow trees, []
Inflection[edit]
Masculine o-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative ros rosL ruisL
Vocative ruis rosL rusuH
Accusative rosN rosL rusuH
Genitive ruisL ros rosN
Dative rusL rosaib rosaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization
Descendants[edit]
  • Irish: ros (wood)
  • Scottish Gaelic: ros (promontory)

Etymology 2[edit]

Possibly from Proto-Indo-European *pr̥so-, which is most likely a borrowing from a non-Indo-European language. See also Latin porrum (leek), English furze, and possibly Ancient Greek πράσον (práson, leek).[2]

Noun[edit]

ros m (genitive ruis, nominative plural ruis)

  1. A linseed.
    • c. 900, Sanas Cormaic, from the Yellow Book of Lecan, Corm. Y 1079
      ros līn
      linseed
  2. A flax - or other small seed.
Inflection[edit]
Masculine o-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative ros rosL ruisL
Vocative ruis rosL rusuH
Accusative rosN rosL rusuH
Genitive ruisL ros rosN
Dative rusL rosaib rosaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization
Descendants[edit]
  • Irish: ros (linseed)
  • Scottish Gaelic: ros (linseed)

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
ros
also rros after a proclitic
ros
pronounced with /r(ʲ)-/
unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Matasović, Ranko (2009) Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN, page 142
  2. ^ MacBain, Alexander; Mackay, Eneas (1911), “ros”, in An Etymological Dictionary of the Gaelic Language, Stirling, →ISBN, page ros

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin rōsus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

ros (past participle of roade)

  1. gnawed

Adjective[edit]

ros m or n (feminine singular roasă, masculine plural roși, feminine and neuter plural roase)

  1. gnawed, eaten away at
  2. eroded, consumed
  3. (of clothes) careworn, threadbare, shabby, seedy, frayed

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Irish ros (linseed)

Noun[edit]

ros m (genitive singular rois, plural rosan)

  1. A linseed, flax seed.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Irish ros (wood, promontory), from Proto-Celtic *ɸrossos, from Proto-Indo-European *pro- (before) + *steh₂- (to stand).

Noun[edit]

ros m (genitive singular rois, plural rosan)

  1. A promontory, peninsula, isthmus.

References[edit]


Seychellois Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French roche

Noun[edit]

ros

  1. A rock, stone.

References[edit]

  • Danielle D’Offay et Guy Lionnet, Diksyonner Kreol - Franse / Dictionnaire Créole Seychellois - Français

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Named after Antonio Ros de Olano (1808–1886), a Spanish general who introduced the hat into the Spanish army

Noun[edit]

ros m (plural roses)

  1. A type of military hat, similar to a shako

Sranan Tongo[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Dutch rossen.

Verb[edit]

ros

  1. To beat up, to give a beating.

Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ruːs/
  • (file)

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Swedish ros‚ from Middle Low German rose, from Latin rosa.

Noun[edit]

ros c

  1. A rose; a flower, a shrub, also as heraldic charge.
Declension[edit]
Declension of ros 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative ros rosen rosor rosorna
Genitive ros rosens rosors rosornas
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

ros

  1. indefinite genitive singular of ro

Etymology 3[edit]

Verb[edit]

ros

  1. infinitive passive of ro.
  2. present tense passive of ro.

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Zoogocho Zapotec[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Spanish arroz, from Andalusian Arabic الرَّوْز(ar-rawz), from Arabic أَرُزّ(ʾaruzz, rice), from Ancient Greek ὄρυζᾰ (óruza).

Noun[edit]

ros

  1. rice

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Spanish rosa, from Latin rosa.

Noun[edit]

ros

  1. rose

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Long C., Rebecca; Cruz M., Sofronio (2000) Diccionario zapoteco de San Bartolomé Zoogocho, Oaxaca (Serie de vocabularios y diccionarios indígenas “Mariano Silva y Aceves”; 38)‎[1] (in Spanish), second electronic edition, Coyoacán, D.F.: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, A.C., page 270