steed

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See also: Steed

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Middle English stede (steed), from Old English stēda (stallion, stud), from Proto-West Germanic *stōdijō; (compare Old Dutch stoti (herd of horses), Old High German stuot (herd of horses)).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: stēd, IPA(key): /stiːd/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iːd

Noun[edit]

steed (plural steeds)

  1. (archaic, poetic) A stallion, especially in the sense of mount.
    • 1593, [William Shakespeare], Venus and Adonis, London: [] Richard Field, [], →OCLC; Shakespeare’s Venus & Adonis: [], 4th edition, London: J[oseph] M[alaby] Dent and Co. [], 1896, →OCLC:
      The studded bridle on a ragged bough
      Nimbly she fastens: -- O, how quick is love! --
      The steed is stalled up, and even now
      To tie the rider she begins to prove:
      Backward she push'd him, as she would be thrust,
      And govern'd him in strength, though not in lust.
      The spelling has been modernized.
  2. (cycling, slang, humorous) A bicycle.
    silent steed
    • 1887 July 26, Thomas Stevens, “Bicycle chat for boys”, in Harper's Young People, volume VIII, number 404, page 614:
      In the green lanes of Merrie England the bicycle rider in his natty uniform, speeding along on his silent steed, is met with almost as often as vehicles drawn by horses, and it is safe to say that in the various countries of the world not less than half a million bicycles and tricycles are now in use.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

steed

  1. Alternative form of stede (place)

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

steed

  1. Alternative form of stede (steed)

North Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Frisian stede, which derives from Proto-Germanic *stadiz. Cognates include West Frisian stêd.

Noun[edit]

steed n (plural steeden)

  1. (Föhr-Amrum) city, town

Derived terms[edit]