et

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Contents

Translingual[edit]

Initialism[edit]

et

  1. (airlines) Ethiopian Airlines' IATA airline designator
  2. (climate) Tundra climate's Köppen climate classification
  3. (Internet) .et, the country code top level domain (ccTLD) for Ethiopia
  4. (ISO) Estonian language's ISO 639 code
  5. (ISO) Ethiopia's ISO 3166-1 country code

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From French et, in turn from Latin et

Conjunction[edit]

et

  1. (obsolete except in fixed phrases) and
See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

et

  1. (colloquial or dialectal) simple past tense and past participle of eat
    • 1896, Samuel Clemens (Mark Twain), Tom Sawyer, Detective [1]:
      Well, the man was astonished, of course; and first off he looked like he didn't know whether to be scared, or glad, or both, or which, but finally he settled down to being glad; and then his color come back, though at first his face had turned pretty white. So we got to talking together while he et his breakfast.
    • 1907, O. Henry, Seats of the Haughty [2]:
      'Boss,' says the cabby, 'I et a steak in that restaurant once. If you're real hungry, I advise you to try the saddle-shops first.'
    • 1919, Bess Streeter Aldrich, A Long-Distance Call From Jim:
      Well, I don't care if he does! I can remember the time when he et a good old-fashioned supper. And it's awful silly to call it dinner. 'Breakfast, dinner and supper, created He them.' I believe I could find them very words in the Bible if I set out to hunt.
    • 1937, J. R. R. Tolkien, The Hobbit:
      Yer can't expect folk to stop here for ever just to be et by you and Bert.
    • 1946 February 18, Life magazine:
      It must have been somethin’ I et!
    • 1996, Dana Lyons, "Cows with Guns":
      They eat to grow, grow to die / Die to be et at the hamburger fry.
    • 2001, Richard Williams, The Animator's Survival Kit, page 220:
      Something I et?

Anagrams[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Uncertain. Possibly from Proto-Indo-European *i̯et 'to set out for; to strive'. Compare Old Irish ītu ‎(thirst), Irish ēt ‎(eagerness, jealousy), Latin sitis ‎(thirst), Tocharian A yat ‎(reach, get). Alternatively from Proto-Indo-European *eus-ti-, cognate to Greek αἰτέω ‎(aἰtéo, to demand, to beg).

Noun[edit]

et f (indefinite plural etje, definite singular etja, definite plural etjet)

  1. thirst

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin (accusative of ), from Proto-Indo-European *twé, *te, accusative of *túh₂ ‎(you).

Pronoun[edit]

et ‎(proclitic, contracted t', enclitic te, contracted enclitic 't)

  1. you, thee (singular, direct or indirect object)

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Chuukese[edit]

Numeral[edit]

et

  1. (cardinal, serial counting) one

Danish[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology Scriptorium.

Pronunciation[edit]

Phonetik.svg This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

Article[edit]

et ‎(common en)

  1. a, an

Estonian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Finnic *että (compare Finnish että), from the same Proto-Uralic root *e- ‎(this) as Hungarian ez

Conjunction[edit]

et

  1. that

Faroese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

et

  1. singular imperative of eta

Finnish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈet/
  • Hyphenation: et

Etymology 1[edit]

Verb[edit]

et

  1. The second-person singular form of the negation verb. The English translations include do not/don’t and not (with auxiliary verbs and be).
Usage notes[edit]
  • The negative verb is used with the connegative form of the main verb. That form is identical to the second-person singular imperative in the indicative present. The potential mood connegative ends in the marker for the mood, -ne-, and the conditional mood connegative ends in the marker for the mood, -isi-. In the indicative past, conditional past and potential past, the active past participle singular (ending -ut/-yt) is used. The connegative form of the main verb is always used without the personal suffix.
  • Usage of et:
  • Indicative:
  • Sinä näet. (You see.) -> Sinä et näe. (You do not see.)
  • Sinä näit. (You saw.) -> Sinä et nähnyt. (You did not see.)
  • Sinä olet nähnyt. (You have seen.) -> Sinä et ole nähnyt. (You have not seen.)
  • Sinä olit nähnyt. (You had seen.) -> Sinä et ollut nähnyt. (You had not seen.)
  • Conditional:
  • Sinä näkisit. (You would see.) -> Sinä et näkisi. (You would not see.)
  • Sinä olisit nähnyt. (You would have seen.) -> Sinä et olisi nähnyt. (You would not have seen.)
  • Potential:
  • Sinä nähnet. (You probably see.) -> Sinä et nähne. (You probably do not see.)
  • Sinä lienet nähnyt. (You have probably seen.) -> Sinä et liene nähnyt. (You have probably not seen.)
Conjugation[edit]
  • The negative verb has no infinitive form. The negative verb is the same with indicative, conditional and potential mood and, with those moods, it is conjugated only in person. (For the second-person singular of the negative verb in the imperative mood, see älä. An archaic optative mood has also a second-person singular form, ällös.)
singular plural
first person en emme
second person et ette
third person ei eivät

Etymology 2[edit]

Shortened form of että.

Conjunction[edit]

et

  1. (subordinating, colloquial) That.
Synonyms[edit]
  • että (standard Finnish)

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin et ‎(and; plus).

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

et

  1. and

Usage notes[edit]

  • et is not subject to liaison.

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin et ‎(and; plus).

Conjunction[edit]

et

  1. (archaic, poetic) Alternative form of e

Latin[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *éti. Cognate with Old English prefix ed- ‎(anew, again). More at ed-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

et

  1. and
  2. (mathematics) plus
    Duo et duo sunt quattuor.
    Two plus two equals four.
  3. (literary) though, even if

Usage notes[edit]

  • When used in pairs, et...et may function like English both...and.

Quotations[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Aragonese: y
  • Aromanian: e
  • Asturian: y
  • Catalan: i
  • Corsican: e
  • Dalmatian: e
  • Franco-Provençal: et
  • French: et
  • Friulian: e
  • Galician: e
  • Ido: e,ed
  • Istriot: e
  • Italian: e, ed, et
  • Norman: et
  • Ladino: i, אי
  • Middle French: et
  • Occitan: e
  • Old French: e, et
  • Old Provençal: e
  • Old Spanish: e
  • Picard: et
  • Portuguese: e
  • Romanian: e
  • Romansch: e, ed
  • Sardinian: e
  • Sicilian: e
  • Spanish: e, y
  • Volapük: e, ed
  • Walloon: et

See also[edit]

Adverb[edit]

et (not comparable)

  1. also, too, besides, or likewise

References[edit]

  • et in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • et in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • ET in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[3], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • the perfect harmony of the universe: totius mundi convenientia et consensus
    • the elements and first beginnings: elementa et tamquam semina rerum
    • gravity: nutus et pondus or simply nutus (ῥοπή)
    • rough and hilly ground: loca aspera et montuosa (Planc. 9. 22)
    • ebb and flow (of tide): accessus et recessus aestuum
    • the alternation of tides: aestus maritimi mutuo accedentes et recedentes (N. D. 2. 53. 132)
    • there is a storm at sea: mare ventorum vi agitatur et turbatur
    • temperate climate: aer calore et frigore temperatus
    • the regular courses of the stars: motus stellarum constantes et rati
    • the star-lit sky; the firmament: caelum astris distinctum et ornatum
    • to be able to bear heat and cold: aestus et frigoris patientem esse
    • to be situate to the north-west: spectare inter occasum solis et septentriones
    • to be separated by an immense interval of space and time: intervallo locorum et temporum disiunctum esse
    • hither and thither: huc (et) illuc
    • twenty years and more: viginti anni et amplius, aut plus
    • night and day: noctes diesque, noctes et dies, et dies et noctes, dies noctesque, diem noctemque
    • one or two days: unus et alter dies
    • to draw every one's eyes upon one: omnium oculos (et ora) ad se convertere
    • to see clearly, distinctly: cernere et videre aliquid
    • to allay one's hunger, thirst: famem sitimque depellere cibo et potione
    • to be able to endure hunger and thirst: famis et sitis patientem esse
    • to have a severe attack of fever: aestu et febri iactari
    • according to circumstances: pro tempore et pro re
    • cause and effect: causae rerum et consecutiones
    • source, origin: fons et caput (vid. sect. III., note caput...)
    • quite accidentally, fortuitously: temere et fortuito; forte (et) temere
    • when life runs smoothly: in rebus prosperis et ad voluntatem fluentibus
    • the changes and chances of this life: ancipites et varii casus
    • to be at the beck and call of another; to be his creature: totum se fingere et accommodare ad alicuius arbitrium et nutum
    • to entreat earnestly; to make urgent requests: orare et obsecrare aliquem
    • to know from hearsay: auditione et fama accepisse aliquid
    • to pay respect to, be courteous to a person: aliquem colere et observare (Att. 2. 19)
    • the matter involves much labour and fatigue: res est multi laboris et sudoris
    • to exert oneself very considerably in a matter: desudare et elaborare in aliqua re (De Senect. 11. 38)
    • to lose one's labour: operam (et oleum) perdere or frustra consumere
    • to strain every nerve, do one's utmost in a matter: contendere et laborare, ut
    • to strain every nerve, do one's utmost in a matter: pro viribus eniti et laborare, ut
    • to grow slack with inactivity, stagnate: (in) otio languere et hebescere
    • to abandon oneself to inactivity and apathy: desidiae et languori se dedere
    • to abandon oneself to inactivity and apathy: ignaviae et socordiae se dare
    • to pass one's life in luxury and idleness: per luxum et ignaviam aetatem agere
    • natural gifts: natura et ingenium
    • absolutely perfect: absolutus et perfectus
    • to bring to the highest perfection: perficere et absolvere
    • ideal perfection: absolutio et perfectio (not summa perfectio)
    • an ideal: undique expleta et perfecta forma
    • to distinguish true and false: vera et falsa (a falsis) diiudicare
    • to banish an error, do away with a false impression: errorem amputare et circumcīdere
    • to give a person the advantage of one's advice (and actual support): aliquem consilio (et re) iuvare
    • vivid recollection: memoria et recordatio
    • many learned men; many scholars: multi viri docti, or multi et ii docti (not multi docti)
    • to have a thorough grasp of a subject: penitus percipere et comprehendere aliquid (De Or. 1. 23. 108)
    • profound scientific education: litterae interiores et reconditae, artes reconditae
    • to be quite uncivilised: omnis cultus et humanitatis expertem esse
    • to be quite uncivilised: ab omni cultu et humanitate longe abesse (B. G. 1. 1. 3)
    • to do a thing which is not one's vocation, which goes against the grain: adversante et repugnante natura or invitā Minervā (ut aiunt) aliquid facere (Off. 1. 31. 110)
    • standard and pattern: auctoritas et exemplum (Balb. 13. 31)
    • those ideas have long ago been given up: illae sententiae iam pridem explosae et eiectae sunt (Fin. 5. 8. 23)
    • logic, dialectic: dialectica (-ae or -orum) (pure Latin disserendi ratio et scientia)
    • an accomplished dialectician: disserendi peritus et artifex
    • moral science; ethics: philosophia, quae est de vita et moribus (Acad. 1. 5. 19)
    • moral science; ethics: philosophia, in qua de bonis rebus et malis, deque hominum vita et moribus disputatur
    • system: ratio; disciplina, ratio et disciplina; ars
    • to systematise: ad rationem, ad artem et praecepta revocare aliquid (De Or. 1. 41)
    • systematic, methodical knowledge: ratio et doctrina
    • to give a scientific explanation of a thing: artificio et via tradere aliquid
    • to proceed, carry on a discussion logically: ratione et via, via et ratione progredi, disputare (Or. 33. 116)
    • logical consistency: perpetuitas et constantia (Tusc. 5. 10. 31)
    • to analyse a general division into its specific parts: genus universum in species certas partiri et dividere (Or. 33. 117)
    • minute, captious subdivisions and definitions: spinae partiendi et definiendi (Tusc. 5. 8. 22)
    • to determine the nature and constitution of the subject under discussion: constituere, quid et quale sit, de quo disputetur
    • to be closely connected with each other: conexum et aptum esse inter se
    • systematic succession, concatenation: continuatio seriesque rerum, ut alia ex alia nexa et omnes inter se aptae colligataeque sint (N. D. 1. 4. 9)
    • all are unanimous: una et consentiens vox est
    • to observe the chronological order of events: servare et notare tempora
    • instrumental music: nervorum et tibiarum cantus
    • vocal and instrumental music: vocum et fidium (nervorum) cantus
    • statues and pictures: signa et tabulae (pictae)
    • to be a ready, fluent speaker: facilem et expeditum esse ad dicendum (Brut. 48. 180)
    • a carefully prepared speech: oratio accurata et polita
    • to be never at a loss for something to say: solutum et expeditum esse ad dicendum
    • an easy, fluent style: expedita et facile currens oratio
    • pure, correct language: oratio pura, pura et emendata
    • a full and copious style of speech: ubertas (not divitiae) et copia orationis
    • abundance of material: materia rerum et copia uberrima
    • abundance of material: infinita et immensa materia
    • to indulge in apt witticisms: facete et commode dicere
    • a short, pointed witticism: breviter et commode dictum
    • to be now jesting, now in earnest: ioca et seria agere
    • the ordinary usage of language, everyday speech: sermo familiaris et cotidianus
    • incorrect usage: consuetudo vitiosa et corrupta (opp. pura et incorrupta) sermonis
    • the fundamental meaning of a word: vis et notio verbi, vocabuli
    • the word aemulatio is employed with two meanings, in a good and a bad sense: aemulatio dupliciter dicitur, ut et in laude et in vitio hoc nomen sit
    • to study Plato: Platonem legere et cognoscere
    • correspondence: litterae missae et allatae
    • to be in correspondence with..: litteras inter se dare et accipere
    • to feel acute pain: doloribus premi, angi, ardere, cruciari, distineri et divelli
    • to be completely prostrated by fear: metu fractum et debilitatum, perculsum esse
    • to show a brisk and cheerful spirit: alacri et erecto animo esse
    • to inspire the spiritless and prostrate with new vigour: excitare animum iacentem et afflictum (opp. frangere animum)
    • to be cast down, discouraged, in despair: animo esse humili, demisso (more strongly animo esse fracto, perculso et abiecto) (Att. 3. 2)
    • hope is vanishing by degrees: spes extenuatur et evanescit
    • somebody's darling: amores et deliciae alicuius
    • to be some one's favourite: in amore et deliciis esse alicui (active in deliciis habere aliquem)
    • having exchanged pledges, promises: fide data et accepta (Sall. Iug. 81. 1)
    • to make virtue the standard in every thought and act: omnia consilia et facta ad virtutem referre (Phil. 10. 10. 20)
    • to eradicate vice: vitia exstirpare et funditus tollere
    • to have self-control; to restrain oneself, master one's inclinations: sibi imperare or continere et coercere se ipsum
    • to kill with violence: vim et manus afferre alicui (Catil. 1. 8. 21)
    • to threaten some one with death, crucifixion, torture, war: minitari (minari) alicui mortem, crucem et tormenta, bellum
    • by the aid of fraud and lies: dolis et fallaciis (Sall. Cat. 11. 2)
    • we are united by many mutual obligations: multa et magna inter nos officia intercedunt (Fam. 13. 65)
    • the Furies harass and torment some one: Furiae agitant et vexant aliquem
    • thought and deed: consilia et facta (cf. sect. X. 1, note For 'thoughts and deeds'...)
    • character: natura et mores; vita moresque; indoles animi ingeniique; or simply ingenium, indoles, natura, mores
    • inconsistency; changeability: mobilitas et levitas animi
    • heavenly things; earthly things: supera et caelestia; humana et citerioria
    • belief in God is part of every one's nature: omnibus innatum est et in animo quasi insculptum esse deum
    • with incense and perfumes: ture et odoribus incensis
    • to profane sacred rites: sacra polluere et violare
    • to fight for hearth and home: pro aris et focis pugnare, certare, dimicare
    • to change one's clothes (and shoes): vestimenta (et calceos) mutare
    • to take only enough food to support life: tantum cibi et potionis adhibere quantum satis est
    • interchange of ideas; conversation: commercium loquendi et audiendi
    • a safe journey to you: bene ambula et redambula
    • imports and exports: res, quae importantur et exportantur
    • account-book; ledger: codex or tabulae ratio accepti et expensi
    • the account of receipts and expenditure: ratio acceptorum et datorum (accepti et expensi) (Amic. 16. 58)
    • credit and financial position: fides et ratio pecuniarum
    • the constitution: instituta et leges
    • to give the state a constitution: rem publicam legibus et institutis temperare (Tusc. 1. 1. 2)
    • to devote one's every thought to the state's welfare: omnes curas et cogitationes in rem publicam conferre
    • to devote oneself body and soul to the good of the state: totum et animo et corpore in salutem rei publicae se conferre
    • high and low: summi (et) infimi (Rep. 1. 34. 53)
    • people of every rank and age: homines omnium ordinum et aetatum
    • a citizen of the world; cosmopolitan: mundanus, mundi civis et incola (Tusc. 5. 37)
    • to proscribe a person, declare him an outlaw: aqua et igni interdicere alicui
    • civil and military offices: magistratus et imperia (Sall. Iug. 3. 1)
    • men of rank and dignity: viri clari et honorati (De Sen. 7. 22)
    • justly and equitably: ex aequo et bono (Caecin. 23. 65)
    • to isolate a witness: aliquem a ceteris separare et in arcam conicere ne quis cum eo colloqui possit (Mil. 22. 60)
    • to keep good discipline amongst one's men: milites coercere et in officio continere (B. C. 1. 67. 4)
    • by force of arms: vi et armis
    • to surround a town with a rampart and fosse: oppidum cingere vallo et fossa
    • with wife and child: cum uxoribus et liberis
    • to have recourse to force of arms: ad vim et arma descendere (vid. sect. V. 9, note Similarly...)
    • fresh troops relieve the tired men: integri et recentes defatigatis succedunt
    • to utterly rout the enemy: caedere et fundere hostem
    • to utterly rout the enemy: fundere et fugare hostem
    • after many had been wounded on both sides: multis et illatis et acceptis vulneribus (B. G. 1. 50)
    • to be subject to some one, under some one's dominion: sub imperio et dicione alicuius esse
    • a dead calm: malacia et tranquillitas (B. G. 3. 15)
    • not to be diffuse on such a well-known subject: ne in re nota et pervulgata multus sim
    • it is quite manifest: apparet et exstat
    • quite rightly: et recte (iure, merito)
    • quite rightly: et recte (iure) quidem

Luxembourgish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *hit. Cognate with German es, English it, Dutch het.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

et

  1. third-person neuter singular, nominative: it
  2. third-person neuter singular, accusative: it, to it

Declension[edit]


Middle Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

et

  1. Alternative form of het

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin et

Conjunction[edit]

et

  1. and

Middle Low German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

et

  1. Alternative form of it.

Declension[edit]



Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French et, from Latin et.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Conjunction[edit]

et

  1. (Jersey) and

Noun[edit]

et m ‎(plural ets)

  1. (Jersey) ampersand

Synonyms[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Article[edit]

et n

  1. a, an (indefinite article used with neuter nouns)

Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

et

  1. imperative of ete

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Verb[edit]

et

  1. present tense of eta and ete
  2. imperative of eta and ete

Novial[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

et ... e

  1. (coordinating) both ... and

Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin et

Conjunction[edit]

et

  1. and
    circa 1170, Chrétien de Troyes, Érec et Énide:
    Blanches et verz, bloes et jaunes
    Whites and greens, blues and yellows.

Pipil[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare Classical Nahuatl etl ‎(bean)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ēt (plural ejēt)

  1. bean
    Shikua et pal titamanat musta
    Buy beans to cook tomorrow

Saterland Frisian[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

et n

  1. it

Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

et m ‎(plural ets)

  1. ampersand

See also[edit]


Tok Pisin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English eight.

Numeral[edit]

et

  1. eight

Usage notes[edit]

Used when counting; see also etpela.


Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Turkic et (“meat”), from Proto-Turkic *et ‎(meat).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

et ‎(definite accusative eti, plural etler)

  1. meat

Declension[edit]


Uzbek[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Turkic *et

Noun[edit]

et ‎(plural etlar)

  1. flesh
  2. meat

Veps[edit]

Verb[edit]

et

  1. second-person plural present of ei

Walloon[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin et.

Conjunction[edit]

et

  1. and