eme

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See also: EME, Eme, ëmë, ēme, eme2, ɛme, -eme, and -ème

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English éam, eom, em, eme (uncle), from Old English ēam (uncle). See eam.

Noun[edit]

eme (plural emes)

  1. (obsolete outside Scotland) An uncle.
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, “quintum”, in Le Morte Darthur, book VIII:
      Soo this yonge syre Trystram rode vnto his eme kynge Marke of Cornewayle / ¶ And whanne he came there / he herd say that ther wold no knyghte fyghte with syre Marhaus / Thenne yede sir Tristram vnto his eme and sayd / syre yf ye wylle gyue me thordre of knyghthode / I wille doo bataille with syr Marhaus
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Qveene. [], London: [] [John Wolfe] for VVilliam Ponsonbie, OCLC 960102938, book II, canto X:
      Whilst they were young, Cassibalane their Eme / Was by the people chosen in their sted []
  2. (Scotland) Friend.

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Basque[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Gascon hemna (woman), from Old Occitan femna (woman), itself from Latin fēmina (woman).[1]

Noun[edit]

eme anim

  1. female
Declension[edit]
Declension of eme (animate, ending in vowel)
indefinite singular plural
absolutive eme emea emeak
ergative emek emeak emeek
dative emeri emeari emeei
genitive emeren emearen emeen
comitative emerekin emearekin emeekin
causative emerengatik emearengatik emeengatik
benefactive emerentzat emearentzat emeentzat
instrumental emez emeaz emeez
inessive emerengan emearengan emeengan
locative
allative emerengana emearengana emeengana
terminative emerenganaino emearenganaino emeenganaino
directive emerenganantz emearenganantz emeenganantz
destinative emerenganako emearenganako emeenganako
ablative emerengandik emearengandik emeengandik
partitive emerik
prolative emetzat

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

eme inan

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter M.
Declension[edit]
Declension of eme (inanimate, ending in vowel)
indefinite singular plural
absolutive eme emea emeak
ergative emek emeak emeek
dative emeri emeari emeei
genitive emeren emearen emeen
comitative emerekin emearekin emeekin
causative emerengatik emearengatik emeengatik
benefactive emerentzat emearentzat emeentzat
instrumental emez emeaz emeez
inessive emetan emean emeetan
locative emetako emeko emeetako
allative emetara emera emeetara
terminative emetaraino emeraino emeetaraino
directive emetarantz emerantz emeetarantz
destinative emetarako emerako emeetarako
ablative emetatik emetik emeetatik
partitive emerik
prolative emetzat
See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ eme” in Etymological Dictionary of Basque by R. L. Trask, sussex.ac.uk

Further reading[edit]

  • "eme" in Euskaltzaindiaren Hiztegia [Dictionary of the Basque Academy], euskaltzaindia.eus
  • eme” in Orotariko Euskal Hiztegia [General Basque Dictionary], euskaltzaindia.eus

Catalan[edit]

Noun[edit]

eme f (plural emes)

  1. (Valencia) Alternative form of ema

Further reading[edit]


Galician[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Noun[edit]

eme m (plural emes)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter M.

Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

em (variation of íme) +‎ e

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

eme

  1. (archaic, poetic) this

Determiner[edit]

eme (demonstrative)

  1. (archaic, poetic) this
    • 1846, Petőfi Sándor, Egy gondolat bánt engemet...
      És a zászlókon eme szent jelszóval: - (And on the flags with this holy word:)
      „Világszabadság!” - (World freedom!)

Usage notes[edit]

A rarer substitute of ez, but unlike ez, it does not take the case of the noun it is attached to, and no definite article is used:

ezen a helyen ― eme helyenat this place
ebben a házban ― eme házbanin this house

Use eme before words beginning with consonants. Use emez before words beginning with vowels (e.g. emez esetben, emez alkalommal).

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • eme in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (‘The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Italian[edit]

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

Etymology[edit]

Back-formation from emoglobina.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

eme m (plural emi)

  1. (biochemistry) heme

Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

eme

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of emō

Mbyá Guaraní[edit]

Adverb[edit]

eme

  1. forms the negative imperative
    Ejae'o eme.
    Don't cry.

Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

eme

  1. Alternative form of em

Nauruan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Pre-Nauruan *mata, from Proto-Micronesian *mata, from Proto-Oceanic *mata, from Proto-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *mata, from Proto-Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *mata, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *mata, from Proto-Austronesian *mata.

Noun[edit]

eme

  1. eye

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese eme.

Pronunciation[edit]

 

  • Hyphenation: e‧me

Noun[edit]

eme m (plural emes)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter M.
    Synonym:

Quotations[edit]

For quotations using this term, see Citations:eme.


Scots[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English eem, from Old English ēam, from Proto-Germanic *awahaimaz (maternal uncle), related to Latin avus (grandfather). Cognate with Dutch Dutch oom, German German Ohm, German Oheim.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

eme (plural emes)

  1. maternal uncle
  2. friend

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

  • uncle (paternal uncle)

Further reading[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

eme f (plural emes)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter M.

Etymology 2[edit]

From mierda (shit).

Noun[edit]

eme f (plural emes)

  1. Euphemistic form of mierda.
    Esa película es una eme.
    That movie is shit.

Further reading[edit]


Sumerian[edit]

Romanization[edit]

eme

  1. Romanization of 𒅴 (eme)

Tacana[edit]

Noun[edit]

eme

  1. hand

Toba Batak[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *həmay, from Proto-Austronesian *Səmay.

Noun[edit]

eme

  1. paddy (unmilled rice), rice (plant)

References[edit]

  • Warneck, J. (1906). Tobabataksch-Deutsches Wörterbuch. Batavia: Landsdrukkerij, p. 65.

West Makian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Perhaps related to West Makian me (he, she, it).

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

eme (possessive prefix di)

  1. third-person plural pronoun, they, them
  2. (polite) third-person singular pronoun, he (him), she (her)
    ifiteng emehe said to him

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • Clemens Voorhoeve (1982) The Makian languages and their neighbours[1], Pacific linguistics