ti-

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Classical Nahuatl[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • t- (before vowels)

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ti/ (before consonants)
  • IPA(key): /t/ (before vowels)

Prefix[edit]

ti-

  1. Subject prefix for verbs; indicates that the subject is first person plural: we.
  2. Subject prefix for verbs; indicates that the subject is second person singular: you; thou.

Usage notes[edit]

  • If used to denote the (first person) plural, then the prefixed verb should also be suffixed with -h.

Related terms[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Demonstratives of European languages in t, such as English (this, that, there, thus, then), French (tel, tant), Polish (ten), Russian (те, то, так, там, такой, тогда). Note also German (dies, den).

Prefix[edit]

ti-

  1. this-, that-. (Demonstrative correlative prefix.)

Usage notes[edit]

By itself, the ti- words do not specify distance, as is the case with French ce. However, the absence of the particle ĉi, which indicates proximity, may suggest greater distance than ĉi would be used for. That is, tiu ĉi (this one) is equivalent to French celui-ci, while tiu (that one) is equivalent to both celui and celui-là. Occasionally the particle for is used (tiu for) for celui-là.

Derived terms[edit]


Maquiritari[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Prefix[edit]

ti-

  1. Allomorph of t- used for stems that begin with a consonant other than w and have a first vowel i.

Inflection[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Prefix[edit]

ti-

  1. Alternative form of te-

Phuthi[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Bantu *jí-, plus augment. Originally the pronominal and verbal concord, it displaced the older Bantu noun prefix *bì-. The tone was lowered by analogy with other noun prefixes.

Prefix[edit]

ti-

  1. Class 8 noun prefix.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Bantu *jí-. Originally the prefix of class 10, it replaced the class 8 prefix as well.

Prefix[edit]

ti-

  1. they; class 8 subject concord.
  2. them; class 8 object concord.
  3. they; class 10 subject concord.
  4. them; class 10 object concord.

Etymology 3[edit]

From Proto-Nguni [Term?].

Prefix[edit]

ti-

  1. Class 10 noun prefix.

Pipil[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Prefix[edit]

ti-

  1. (personal) you, second-person singular subject marker.
    Te tiweli tipanu
    you cannot pass
  2. (personal) we, first-person plural subject marker.
    Tiknekit tikwat et
    We want to eat beans

See also[edit]

  • taja (personal pronoun)
  • metz- (object marker)
  • tejemet (personal pronoun)
  • tech- (object marker)
  • -t (plural verb suffix)

Swazi[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Bantu *jí-, plus augment. Originally the pronominal and verbal concord, it displaced the older Bantu noun prefix *bì-. The tone was lowered by analogy with other noun prefixes.

Prefix[edit]

ti-

  1. Class 8 noun prefix.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Bantu *jí-. Originally the prefix of class 10, it replaced the class 8 prefix as well.

Prefix[edit]

ti-

  1. they; class 8 subject concord.
  2. them; class 8 object concord.
  3. they; class 10 subject concord.
  4. them; class 10 object concord.

Taos[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Prefix[edit]

ti-

  1. (transitive) First person singular subject + third person singular object.

Uneapa[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From earlier *tina- via haplology from *tina-na > ti-na, from Proto-Oceanic *tina, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *tina, from Proto-Austronesian *ta-ina, from *ina.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ti-

  1. mother

Further reading[edit]

  • Terry Crowley et al, The Oceanic Languages (2013), page 366
  • Johnston, R.L. 1982. "Proto-Kimbe and the New Guinea Oceanic hypothesis". In Halim, A., Carrington, L. and Wurm, S.A. editors. Papers from the Third International Conference on Austronesian Linguistics, Vol. 1: Currents in Oceanic, 59-95.

West Makian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ti-

  1. first-person singular possessive prefix, my

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • Clemens Voorhoeve (1982) The Makian languages and their neighbours[1], Pacific linguistics