tant

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Tant, tänt, and tant'

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin tantus, tantum.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

tant (feminine tanta, masculine plural tants, feminine plural tantes)

  1. so much, as much
    Tinc tanta gana que me'n vaig a sopar.
    I am so hungry that I'm going to have dinner. (literally 'I have so much hunger')
  2. so many, as many

Derived terms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

tant

  1. so much, as much
  2. so long; such a long time

Conjunction[edit]

tant

  1. (tant ... com ...) both ... and ...

Further reading[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French tant, from Latin tantum

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /tɑ̃/
  • (file)

Adverb[edit]

tant

  1. so much
  2. so many

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin tantum.

Adjective[edit]

tant

  1. so many, so much

Related terms[edit]


Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

tan +‎ -t

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈtɒnt]
  • Hyphenation: tant

Noun[edit]

tant

  1. accusative singular of tan

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old French tant.

Adverb[edit]

tant

  1. so (to such an extent)

Descendants[edit]

  • French: tant

References[edit]

  • tant on Dictionnaire du Moyen Français (1330–1500) (in French)

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French tant.

Adverb[edit]

tant

  1. as much

Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *tanþs.

Noun[edit]

tant m

  1. tooth

Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • tant”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin tantus, tantum.

Adjective[edit]

tant m (oblique and nominative feminine singular tante)

  1. so much, so many

Usage notes[edit]

Unlike modern French, tant can qualify a noun directly without the preposition de:

tantes persones
so many people

Declension[edit]

Adverb[edit]

tant

  1. so much; such

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French tante, from Old French ante (nominative form), from Latin amita, diminutive of Proto-Indo-European *amma-, *ama- (mother), a lost baby-word of the papa-type.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tant c

  1. (might be derogatory) older lady
    Synonym: gumma
  2. (then formal, now dated) Used to address older women.

Declension[edit]

Declension of tant 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative tant tanten tanter tanterna
Genitive tants tantens tanters tanternas

Hyponyms[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Tocharian B[edit]

Noun[edit]

tant

  1. power, dominion

Vilamovian[edit]

Noun[edit]

tant f

  1. aunt

Synonyms[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *tantā, from Proto-Indo-European *ten- (to stretch). Cognate with Irish téad.

Noun[edit]

tant m (plural tannau)

  1. string (musical instrument)

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
tant dant nhant thant
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.