tant

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Tant, tänt, and tant'

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin tantus, tantum.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

tant (feminine tanta, masculine plural tants, feminine plural tantes)

  1. so much, as much
    Tinc tanta gana que me'n vaig a sopar.
    I am so hungry that I'm going to have dinner.
    (literally, “I have so much hunger”)
  2. so many, as many

Derived terms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

tant

  1. so much, as much
  2. so long; such a long time

Conjunction[edit]

tant

  1. (tant ... com ...) both ... and ...

Further reading[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French tant, from Latin tantum.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

tant

  1. so much
  2. so many
  3. (in coordination with que) both ... and
    • 2019, Isabelle Grégoire, Fille de fer
      Cela dit, bien que la ressemblance avec des personnes ou des situations réelles ne soit pas toujours fortuite, Fille de fer est une œuvre de fiction. J'ai pris de nombreuses libertés, tant avec l'histoire qu'avec la géographie — un exercice réjouissant pour une journaliste !
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin tantum.

Adjective[edit]

tant

  1. so many, so much

Related terms[edit]


Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

tan +‎ -t

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈtɒnt]
  • Hyphenation: tant

Noun[edit]

tant

  1. accusative singular of tan

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old French tant.

Adverb[edit]

tant

  1. so (to such an extent)

Descendants[edit]

  • French: tant

References[edit]

  • tant on Dictionnaire du Moyen Français (1330–1500) (in French)

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French tant.

Adverb[edit]

tant

  1. as much

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From tantum.

Noun[edit]

tant m (definite singular tanten, indefinite plural tanter, definite plural tantene)

  1. fantasy, rumor

References[edit]


Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *tanþ.

Noun[edit]

tant m

  1. tooth

Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • tant”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin tantus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

tant m (oblique and nominative feminine singular tante)

  1. so much, so many

Usage notes[edit]

Unlike modern French, tant can qualify a noun directly without the preposition de:

tantes persones
so many people

Declension[edit]

Adverb[edit]

tant

  1. so much; such

Piedmontese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

tant

  1. so many, so much

Pronoun[edit]

tant

  1. much

Adverb[edit]

tant

  1. so many, so much

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French tante, from Old French ante (nominative form), from Latin amita, diminutive of Proto-Indo-European *amma-, *ama- (mother), a lost baby-word of the papa-type.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tant c

  1. (might be derogatory) older lady
    Synonym: gumma
  2. (then formal, now dated) Used to address older women.

Declension[edit]

Declension of tant 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative tant tanten tanter tanterna
Genitive tants tantens tanters tanternas

Hyponyms[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Tocharian B[edit]

Noun[edit]

tant

  1. power, dominion

Vilamovian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French tante, from Old French antain. Compare English aunt, which lacked the initial t as an Anglo-Norman borrowing.

Noun[edit]

tant f

  1. aunt

Synonyms[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *tantā, from Proto-Indo-European *ten- (to stretch). Cognate with Irish téad.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tant m (plural tannau)

  1. string (musical instrument)

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
tant dant nhant thant
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.