my

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English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (stressed) enPR: IPA(key): /maɪ/
  • (unstressed) IPA(key): /maɪ/, /mə/
    • (unstressed, Cockney) IPA(key): /mɪ/, /mi/
  • IPA(key): /mi/ in some speakers of Hiberno-English, Scouse
  • Rhymes: -aɪ
  • Homophone: muh (some dialects)

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English my, apocopated form of min, myn, from Old English mīn (my, mine), from Proto-Germanic *mīnaz (my, mine, pron.) (genitive of *ek (I)), from Proto-Indo-European *méynos (my; mine). Cognate with West Frisian myn (my), Afrikaans my (my), Dutch mijn (my), German mein (my), Swedish min (my). More at me.

Determiner[edit]

my

  1. First-person singular possessive determiner. See Appendix:Possessive#English.
    1. Belonging to me.
      I can't find my book.
    2. Associated with me.
      My seat at the restaurant was uncomfortable.
      Don't you know my name?
      I recognised him because he had attended my school.
    3. Related to me.
      My parents won't let me go out tonight.
    4. In the possession of me.
      I have to take my books back to the library soon.
Related terms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

An abbreviation of an oath such as my word or my lord

Interjection[edit]

my

  1. Used to express surprise, shock or amazement.
    My, what big teeth you have!
Derived terms[edit]

Statistics[edit]

Most common English words before 1923 in Project Gutenberg: him · she · they · #34: my · were · are · their

Afrikaans[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Dutch mij.

Pronoun[edit]

my (subject ek)

  1. me (object)

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Dutch mijn.

Determiner[edit]

my

  1. my; of me

See also[edit]


Cornish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Brythonic *mi, from Proto-Celtic *mī.

Pronoun[edit]

my

  1. I, me

Czech[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *my, from Proto-Indo-European *nos

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

my

  1. we

Declension[edit]


Danish[edit]

Noun[edit]

my n (singular definite myet, plural indefinite myer)

  1. The Greek letter μ (mu)

Declension[edit]

Noun[edit]

my c

  1. micron

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]


Egyptian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

mj (like) +‎ -j (adverbializing suffix).

Adverb[edit]

mi i i
  1. likewise
  2. accordingly

References[edit]

  • Allen, James (2000) Middle Egyptian: An Introduction to the Language and Culture of Hieroglyphs, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, ISBN 0-521-77483-7

Lojban[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Cmavo[edit]

my (selma'o BY2 )

  1. Letteral for m.

Lower Sorbian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *my, from Proto-Indo-European *nos

Pronoun[edit]

my pl

  1. we

Declension[edit]


Manx[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

my

  1. if

Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *my, from Proto-Indo-European *nos.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

my

  1. we (first person plural )

Declension[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • my in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

my

  1. Obsolete form of mim.

Slovak[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *my, from Proto-Indo-European *nos

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

my

  1. we

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • my in Slovak dictionaries at korpus.sk

Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

my n

  1. The Greek letter μ (mu)

Upper Sorbian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *my, from Proto-Indo-European *nos

Pronoun[edit]

my

  1. we

West Frisian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

my

  1. me

Westrobothnian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [mýː], [mǿʏ̯ː], [mʊ́ɪ̯ː]
    Rhymes: -ýː

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse , from Proto-Germanic *mugjǭ, *mują, from Proto-Indo-European *mu (fly), *mew-. Cognates with Norwegian mygg, Swedish mygga, Danish myg, Old English mycg, mycge (whence Middle English mygga, English midge); Old High German mucka (German Mücke (mosquito)); Latvian muša; Albanian mizë; Russian муха (múxa); Ancient Greek μυῖα (muîa); Ukrainian муха (múxa); Bulgarian муха (múxa); Lower Sorbian mucha, Polish mucha and Slovak mucha. Akin to Latin musca (fly). Compare the Dutch mug.

Noun[edit]

my n

  1. (collective) mosquitoes

Noun[edit]

my f

  1. mosquito

Derived terms[edit]