thay

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See also: thây, thấy, thầy, and thẩy

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Article[edit]

thay

  1. Eye dialect spelling of the.
    • 1861, Thomas Hughes, Tom Brown at Oxford[1]:
      "The chaps as catches the big fishes, sir," went on the keeper, getting confidential, "is thay cussed night-line poachers."

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

thay

  1. Eye dialect spelling of say, to indicate a speaker with a speech impediment such as a lisp.
    • 1868, Sophie May, Dotty Dimple at Her Grandmother's[2]:
      "Good girlth don't thay tho," said sweet little Charlie rather shocked.
    • 1903, Burt L. Standish, Frank Merriwell's Bravery[3]:
      Do you mean to thay I am no gentleman, thir?

Etymology 3[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

thay

  1. Obsolete spelling of they
    • 1506, Alexander Barclay, The Ship of Fools, Volume 1[4]:
      Yet fynde I another sort almoste as bad as thay.
    • 1566, John Knox, The Works of John Knox, Vol. 1 (of 6)[5]:
      But potent is he against whome thei faught; for when thay wicked war in greatast securitie, then begane God to schaw his anger.
    • 1838, William Makepeace Thackeray, Memoirs of Mr. Charles J. Yellowplush[6]:
      Law bless us! there was four of us on this stairkes, four as nice young men as you ever see: Mr. Bruffy's young man, Mr. Dawkinses, Mr. Blewitt's, and me--and we knew what our masters was about as well as thay did theirselfs.

Vietnamese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology Scriptorium.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

thay

  1. to change, to replace

Derived terms[edit]