thee

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See also: Thee, thée, and the'e

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English þe, from Old English þē (thee, originally dative, but later also accusative), from Proto-Germanic *þiz (thee), from Proto-Indo-European *te (second-person singular pronoun). Cognate with German Low German di (thee), German dir (thee, dative pron.), Icelandic þér (thee). More at thou.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: thē, IPA(key): /ðiː/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iː
  • Homophone: the (when stressed)

Pronoun[edit]

thee (second-person singular, objective case, nominative thou, reflexive thyself)

  1. (now chiefly archaic, literary) Objective and reflexive case of thou. [from 8th c.]
    • 1598, William Shakespeare, Henry IV part 1, page 1.2.49-50:
      Prince Henry: Did I ever call for thee to pay thy part?
      Falstaff: No; I'll give thee thy due, thou hast paid all there.
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost:
      Michael, this my behest have thou in charge,
      Take to thee from among the Cherubim
      Thy choice of flaming Warriours, least the Fiend
    • 1742, Charles Wesley (music), “Come, O Thou Traveler Unknown”:
      Come, O thou Traveller unknown, / Whom still I hold, but cannot see! / My company before is gone, / And I am left alone with Thee; / With Thee all night I mean to stay, / And wrestle till the break of day.
  2. (now chiefly archaic, dialect) Thou. [from 12th c.]
    • 1773, Frances Burney, Journals & Letters, Penguin 2001:
      [H]e immediately perceived when I was taken ill, and, after seeing Mama, said to me "I am afraid Thee art not well thyself?"
    • 1852, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom's Cabin:
      "What does thee want, father?" said Rachel.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

thee (third-person singular simple present thees, present participle theeing, simple past and past participle theed)

  1. (transitive) To address (a person) using the pronoun thee.
    Synonym: thou
    • 1677, William Gibson, “An Answer to John Cheyney’s Pamphlet Entituled The Shibboleth of Quakerism”, in The Life of God, which is the Light and Salvation of Men, Exalted: [], [London: s.n.], OCLC 802074687, page 134:
      What! doſt thou not believe that God's Thouing and theeing was and is ſound Speech? [...] And theeing & Thouing of one ſingle Perſon was the language of Chriſt Jeſus, and the Holy Prophets and Apoſtles both under the Diſpenſations of Law and Goſpel, [...]
  2. (intransitive) To use the word thee.
    Synonym: thou
    • 2006, Julian Dibbell, chapter 5, in Play Money: Or, How I Quit My Day Job and Made Millions Trading Virtual Loot, New York, N.Y.: Basic Books, →ISBN:
      The hardcore role-players will wake up one day feeling, like a dead weight on their chest, the strain of endless texting in Renaissance Faire English—yet dutifully go on theeing and thouing all the same.
    • 2009, David R. Keeston [pseudonym; Alan D. Jenkins], “Seeing God in the Ordinary”, in The Hitch Hikers’ Guide to the Gospel, [Morrisville, N.C.]: Lulu.com, →ISBN, page 39:
      You want to hear the word of God, and be challenged to go out and change the world. Instead, you are, for the fifth Sunday in a row, mewling on about purple-headed mountains (which is a bit of an imaginative stretch, since you live in East Anglia) and "theeing" and "thouing" all over the place.

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English theen (to increase, prosper, flourish), from Old English þēon (to thrive, prosper, flourish, grow), from Proto-Germanic *þinhaną (to thrive, succeed), from Proto-Indo-European *tenk- (to succeed, turn out well). Cognate with Dutch gedijen (to flourish, thrive, prosper, succeed), German gedeihen (to thrive), Gothic 𐌲𐌰𐌸𐌴𐌹𐌷𐌰𐌽 (gaþeihan, to increase, thrive).

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

thee (third-person singular simple present thees, present participle theeing, simple past and past participle theed)

  1. (intransitive, Britain, obsolete) To thrive; prosper.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Pitman zee, which it is related to phonetically and graphically, and the sound it represents.

Noun[edit]

thee (plural thees)

  1. The letter ⟨(⟩, which stands for the th sound /ð/ in Pitman shorthand.
Related terms[edit]
  • ith
  • eth, the name of the IPA letter for this sound

Anagrams[edit]


Acehnese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Chamic *thɔw, from Proto-Malayo-Chamic, from Proto-Malayo-Sumbawan, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *taqu, from Proto-Austronesian *Caqu.

Verb[edit]

thee

  1. to be informed

Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Malay teh, from Min Nan (). The "-h-" is a faux-Greek spelling (compare Greek τσάι (tsái)).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Gevuld theeglas
Filled tea glass

thee m (plural theeën, diminutive theetje n)

  1. tea

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

thee

  1. Alternative form of þe (thee)

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

thee

  1. Alternative form of theen

Old Irish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

thee

  1. Alternative spelling of thé: lenited form of tee (hot).

Scots[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English þēoh, from Proto-Germanic *þeuhą, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *tewk-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

thee (plural thees)

  1. thigh

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English theen, from Old English þēon, from Proto-Germanic *þinhaną.

Verb[edit]

thee (third-person singular present thees, present participle theein, past theet, past participle theet)

  1. (archaic, literary) To thrive, prosper

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English þe, from Old English þē (thee, originally dative, but later also accusative), from Proto-Germanic *þiz (thee), from Proto-Indo-European *te (second-person singular pronoun).

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

thee (subjective case thou, reflexive thysel, possessive determiner thy)

  1. (archaic outside Orkney and Shetland) thee, you (2nd person singular object pronoun, informal)
  2. (Orkney, Shetland) thou, you (2nd person singular subject pronoun, informal)
Usage notes[edit]
  • Regularly used throughout Scotland up until the middle of the 1800s; now only used as an archaism outside Shetland and Orkney.
References[edit]