thee

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See also: Thee, thée, and the'e

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English thee, the, from Middle English þē (thee, originally dative, but later also accusative), from Proto-Germanic *þiz (thee), from Proto-Indo-European *te (second-person singular pronoun). Cognate with German Low German di (thee), German dir (thee, dative pron.), Icelandic þér (thee). More at thou.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: thē, IPA(key): /ðiː/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iː
  • Homophone: the (when stressed)

Pronoun[edit]

thee (second-person singular, objective case, nominative thou, reflexive thyself)

  1. (now chiefly archaic, literary) Objective and reflexive case of thou. [from 8th c.]
    • 1598, Shakespeare, Henry IV part 1, 1.2.49-50:
      Prince Henry: Did I ever call for thee to pay thy part?
      Falstaff: No; I'll give thee thy due, thou hast paid all there.
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost:
      Michael, this my behest have thou in charge,
      Take to thee from among the Cherubim
      Thy choice of flaming Warriours, least the Fiend
    • 1742, Charles Wesley (music), “Come, O Thou Traveler Unknown”:
      Come, O thou Traveller unknown, / Whom still I hold, but cannot see! / My company before is gone, / And I am left alone with Thee; / With Thee all night I mean to stay, / And wrestle till the break of day.
  2. (now chiefly archaic, dialect) Thou. [from 12th c.]
    • 1773, Frances Burney, Journals & Letters, Penguin 2001, p. 23:
      [H]e immediately perceived when I was taken ill, and, after seeing Mama, said to me ‘I am afraid Thee art not well thyself?’
    • 1852, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom's Cabin:
      ‘What does thee want, father?’ said Rachel.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

thee (third-person singular simple present thees, present participle theeing, simple past and past participle theed)

  1. (transitive) To address (a person) using the pronoun thee.
    Synonym: thou
    • 1677, William Gibson, “An Answer to John Cheyney’s Pamphlet Entituled The Shibboleth of Quakerism”, in The Life of God, which is the Light and Salvation of Men, Exalted: [], [London: s.n.], OCLC 802074687, page 134:
      What! doſt thou not believe that God's Thouing and theeing was and is ſound Speech? [...] And theeing & Thouing of one ſingle Perſon was the language of Chriſt Jeſus, and the Holy Prophets and Apoſtles both under the Diſpenſations of Law and Goſpel, [...]
  2. (intransitive) To use the word thee.
    Synonym: thou
    • 2006, Julian Dibbell, chapter 5, in Play Money: Or, How I Quit My Day Job and Made Millions Trading Virtual Loot, New York, N.Y.: Basic Books, →ISBN:
      The hardcore role-players will wake up one day feeling, like a dead weight on their chest, the strain of endless texting in Renaissance Faire English—yet dutifully go on theeing and thouing all the same.
    • 2009, David R. Keeston [pseudonym; Alan D. Jenkins], “Seeing God in the Ordinary”, in The Hitch Hikers’ Guide to the Gospel, [Morrisville, N.C.]: Lulu.com, →ISBN, page 39:
      You want to hear the word of God, and be challenged to go out and change the world. Instead, you are, for the fifth Sunday in a row, mewling on about purple-headed mountains (which is a bit of an imaginative stretch, since you live in East Anglia) and "theeing" and "thouing" all over the place.
See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English theen (to increase, prosper, flourish), from Old English þēon (to thrive, prosper, flourish, grow), from Proto-Germanic *þinhaną (to thrive, succeed), from Proto-Indo-European *tenk- (to succeed, turn out well). Cognate with Dutch gedijen (to flourish, thrive, prosper, succeed), German gedeihen (to thrive), Gothic 𐌲𐌰𐌸𐌴𐌹𐌷𐌰𐌽 (gaþeihan, to increase, thrive).

Pronunciation[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

thee (third-person singular simple present thees, present participle theeing, simple past and past participle theed)

  1. (intransitive, Britain, obsolete) To thrive; prosper.
    • (Can we date this quote by Spenser and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Well mote thee, as well can wish your thought.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Pitman zee, which it is related to phonetically and graphically, and the sound it represents.

Noun[edit]

thee (plural thees)

  1. The letter ⟨(⟩, which stands for the th sound /ð/ in Pitman shorthand.
Related terms[edit]
  • ith
  • eth, the name of the IPA letter for this sound

Anagrams[edit]


Acehnese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Chamic *thɔw, from Proto-Malayo-Chamic, from Proto-Malayo-Sumbawan, from Proto-Sunda-Sulawesi, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *taqu, from Proto-Austronesian *Caqu.

Verb[edit]

thee

  1. to be informed

Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Malay teh, from Min Nan (). The "-h-" is a faux-Greek spelling (compare Greek τσάι (tsái)).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Gevuld theeglas
Filled tea glass

thee m (plural theeën, diminutive theetje n)

  1. tea

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Afrikaans: tee
  • West Frisian: tee
  • Dutch Low Saxon: thee
  • Danish: te
    • Faroese: te
  • English: tea
  • French: thé
    • Haitian Creole: te
    • Louisiana Creole French: thé
    • Coeur d'Alene: liiti
    • Greek: τέϊον (téïon) (with neuter suffix -ion)
    • Italian:
    • Norman: thée
    • Occitan:
    • Old Armenian: թէյ (tʿēy) (post-classical)
    • Romansch: te, ,
    • Tiri: tee
    • Walloon:
  • German: Tee
    • German Low German: Tee
      • Plautdietsch: Tee
    • Estonian: tee
    • Hunsrik: Tee
    • Lower Sorbian: tej
    • Romansch: te, ,
    • Saterland Frisian: Tee
    • Silesian: tyj
      • Slovene: te (dialectal)
    • Silesian German: Tee
    • Vilamovian: tyy
    • Zipser German: Tee
  • Icelandic: te
  • New Latin: thea
  • Latvian: tēja
  • Norwegian: te
  • Spanish:
    • Asturian:
    • Basque: te
    • Catalan: te
    • Galician:
    • Navajo: dééh
    • Occitan:
  • Sranan Tongo: te
  • Swedish: te, the, thé
    • Finnish: tee

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English þĕ.

Pronoun[edit]

thee

  1. Alternative form of þe

References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English þēon.

Verb[edit]

thee

  1. Alternative form of theen

Old Irish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

thee

  1. Alternative spelling of thé: lenited form of tee (hot).

Scots[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English þēoh, from Proto-Germanic *þeuhą, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *tewk-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

thee (plural thees)

  1. thigh

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English theen, from Old English þēon, from Proto-Germanic *þinhaną.

Verb[edit]

thee (third-person singular present thees, present participle theein, past theet, past participle theet)

  1. (archaic, literary) To thrive, prosper