thee

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English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English thee, the, from Old English þē ‎(thee, originally dative, but later also accusative), from Proto-Germanic *þiz ‎(thee), from Proto-Indo-European *te ‎(second-person singular pronoun). Cognate with German Low German du ‎(thee), German dir ‎(thee, dative pron.), Icelandic þér ‎(thee). More at thou.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

thee ‎(second-person singular, objective case, nominative thou, reflexive thyself)

  1. (archaic, literary) Objective case of thou.
    • 1598, Shakespeare, Henry IV part 1, 1.2.49-50:
      Prince Henry: Did I ever call for thee to pay thy part?
      Falstaff: No; I'll give thee thy due, thou hast paid all there.
    • 1742, Charles Wesley (music), “Come, O Thou Traveler Unknown”, in (Please provide the album title):
      Come, O thou Traveller unknown, / Whom still I hold, but cannot see! / My company before is gone, / And I am left alone with Thee; / With Thee all night I mean to stay, / And wrestle till the break of day.
  2. (Quaker, Amish, Pennsylvania Dutch English) Thou.
    Thee is a little strange, I think.
Usage notes[edit]

When used in place of the nominative thou, thee uses the third-person singular form of verbs (see example above).

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

thee ‎(third-person singular simple present thees, present participle theeing, simple past and past participle theed)

  1. (transitive) To address (somebody) as "thee"; to thou.
See also[edit]


Statistics[edit]

Most common English words before 1923: case · fact · known · #315: thee · hope · er · children

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English theen ‎(to increase, prosper, flourish), from Old English þēon ‎(to thrive, prosper, flourish, grow), from Proto-Germanic *þinhaną ‎(to thrive, succeed), from Proto-Indo-European *tenk-, *tenkh- ‎(to succeed, turn out well). Cognate with Dutch gedijen ‎(to flourish, thrive, prosper, succeed), German gedeihen ‎(to thrive), Gothic 𐌲𐌰𐌸𐌴𐌹𐌷𐌰𐌽 ‎(gaþeihan, to increase, thrive).

Pronunciation[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • the (Scotland)

Verb[edit]

thee ‎(third-person singular simple present thees, present participle theeing, simple past and past participle theed)

  1. (intransitive, archaic, literary, Britain dialectal) To thrive; prosper.
    • Spenser
      Well mote thee, as well can wish your thought.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Pitman zee, which it is related to phonetically and graphically, and the sound it represents.

Noun[edit]

thee ‎(plural thees)

  1. The name of the letter ⟨(⟩, which stands for the th sound /ð/ in Pitman shorthand.
Related terms[edit]
  • ith
  • eth, the name of the IPA letter for this sound

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nl

Etymology[edit]

From Min Nan ‎() through Malay teh. The "-h-" is a faux-Greek spelling (compare Greek τσάι ‎(tsái)).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Gevuld theeglas
Filled tea glass

thee m ‎(plural theeën, diminutive theetje n)

  1. tea

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English þēoh, from Proto-Germanic *þeuhą, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *tewk-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

thee (plural thees)

  1. thigh