ny

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English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Verb[edit]

ny

  1. Obsolete spelling of nigh

Cornish[edit]

Particle[edit]

ny

Pronunciation[edit]

IPA(key): /nɪ/

  1. not

Pronoun[edit]

ny

Pronunciation[edit]

IPA(key): /niː/, /nəɪ/

  1. we
  2. us

Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse nýr, from Proto-Germanic *niwjaz, from Proto-Indo-European *néwos (new).

Adjective[edit]

ny (neuter nyt, plural and definite singular attributive ny or nye, comparative nyere, superlative (predicative) nyest, superlative (attributive) {{{5}}})

  1. new
  2. fresh
  3. recent
  4. novel
  5. other
  6. different
  7. definite and plural of ny

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse .

Noun[edit]

ny n (singular definite nyet, not used in plural form)

  1. new moon, waxing moon
Antonyms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Ancient Greek Ν (N), ν (n).

Noun[edit]

ny n (singular definite nyet, plural indefinite nyer)

  1. nu; the Greek letter Ν, ν
Inflection[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Lojban[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Cmavo[edit]

ny (selma'o BY2 BY2)

  1. letteral for n

Malagasy[edit]

Article[edit]

ny

  1. the (definite article)

Manx[edit]

Article[edit]

ny

  1. genitive singular feminine of yn
    Purt ny h-InsheyPeel (lit. Port of the Island)
  2. nominative plural of yn
    ny h-einthe birds
  3. genitive plural of yn
    laa jeh ny laaghynone of the days

Usage notes[edit]

Prefixes h- to words beginning with vowels.


Middle French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Conjunction[edit]

ny

  1. neither; nor
Usage notes[edit]
  • Chiefly used at least twice in the same sentence, such as
    ny riche, ny pouvreneither rich nor poor
    .
Descendants[edit]
  • French: ni

Etymology 2[edit]

See n'y

Contraction[edit]

ny

  1. manuscript form of n'y

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse nýr, from Proto-Germanic *niwjaz, from Proto-Indo-European *néwos (new).

Adjective[edit]

ny (neuter singular nytt, definite singular and plural nye, comparative nyere, superlative nyest or nyeste)

  1. new (recently made or created)

Derived terms[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse nýr, from Proto-Germanic *niwjaz, from Proto-Indo-European *néwos (new). Akin to English new.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

ny (neuter singular nytt, definite singular and plural nye, comparative nyare, superlative nyast or nyaste)

  1. new (as above)

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

ny f (plural nys)

  1. nu; the Greek letter Ν, ν

Synonyms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse nýr, from Proto-Germanic *niwjaz, from Proto-Indo-European *néwos (new).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

ny (comparative nyare, superlative nyast)

  1. new

Declension[edit]

Inflection of ny
Indefinite Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular ny nyare nyast
Neuter singular nytt nyare nyast
Plural nya nyare nyast
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 nye nyare nyaste
All nya nyare nyaste
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in the predicative.

Vilamovian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

ny

  1. no