novel

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See also: növel and nővel

English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French novel (new, fresh, recent, recently made or done, strange, rare) (modern nouvel, nouveau), from Latin novellus (new, fresh, young, modern), diminutive of novus (new). Doublet of nouveau.

Adjective[edit]

novel (comparative more novel, superlative most novel)

  1. new, original, especially in an interesting way
Usage notes[edit]
  • Said of ideas, ways, etc.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Old French novelle, from Latin novella, feminine of novellus.

Noun[edit]

novel (plural novels)

  1. (obsolete) A novelty; something new. [15th-18th c.]

Etymology 3[edit]

Borrowed from Italian novella, from Latin novella, feminine of novellus.

Noun[edit]

novel

  1. (now historical) A fable; a short tale, especially one of many making up a larger work. [from 16th c.]
    • 1621, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy, Oxford: Printed by Iohn Lichfield and Iames Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 216894069; The Anatomy of Melancholy, 2nd corrected and augmented edition, Oxford: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, 1624, OCLC 54573970, partition 2, section 2, member 4:
      merry tales [] such as the old woman told of Psyche in Apuleius, Boccace novels, and the rest, quarum auditione pueri delectantur, senes narratione, which some delight to hear, some to tell, all are well pleased with.
  2. A work of prose fiction, longer than a novella. [from 17th c.]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

Borrowed from Latin novella, feminine of novellus.

  1. (classical studies, historical) A new legal constitution in ancient Rome. [from 17th c.]

Anagrams[edit]


Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin novellus, from novus.

Adjective[edit]

novel m (oblique and nominative feminine singular novele)

  1. new

Declension[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Old Occitan[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin novellus. Compare Old French novel.

Adjective[edit]

novel m (feminine singular novela, masculine plural novels, feminine plural novelas)

  1. new

Descendants[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Catalan novell, from Latin novellus.

Adjective[edit]

novel (plural noveles)

  1. novel, new

Noun[edit]

novel m, f (plural noveles)

  1. newbie, green

Related terms[edit]