neu

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Neu, nèu, nếu, and neu-

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

The name of this oncogene is abbreviated from a neuroglioblastoma cell line, from which it was originally isolated in rats.

Noun[edit]

neu

  1. Abbreviation of neuroglioblastoma cell line.

Noun[edit]

neu (uncountable)

  1. (oncology) Synonym of HER-2

Basque[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /neu/, /neu̯/, [new]

Pronoun[edit]

neu

  1. (emphatic) first-person singular personal pronoun; I

Usage notes[edit]

  • Emphatic pronouns are primarily used to mark the focus of a sentence:
Neuk erosiko dut.I (not you) will buy it.

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan, from Latin nix, nivem, from Proto-Italic *sniks, from Proto-Indo-European *snígʷʰs. Compare Occitan nèu.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

neu f (plural neus)

  1. snow

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Central Franconian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • nei (Moselle Franconian)

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German niuwi, from Proto-Germanic *niwjaz, from Proto-Indo-European *néwos.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

neu (masculine neue, feminine neu, comparative neuer, superlative et neuste)

  1. (Ripuarian) new

Esperanto[edit]

Verb[edit]

neu

  1. imperative of nei

German[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German niuwi, from Proto-Germanic *niwjaz, from Proto-Indo-European *néwos. Compare Dutch nieuw, English new, Danish ny, Gothic 𐌽𐌹𐌿𐌾𐌹𐍃 (niujis).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /nɔʏ̯/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɔɪ̯

Adjective[edit]

neu (comparative neuer, superlative am neuesten or am neusten)

  1. new
    neue Modenew fashion
    neueste Modelatest fashion, latest style
    was gibt's Neues?what's the latest news?
    etwas neu machento renovate
  2. modern, recent, latest
    die neue Geschichtemodern history, recent history

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • neu” in Duden online
  • neu” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache
  • Friedrich Kluge (1883) , “neu”, in John Francis Davis, transl., Etymological Dictionary of the German Language, published 1891

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Apocope of nēve.

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

neu

  1. Alternative form of nēve

References[edit]

  • neu in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • neu in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • neu in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

Montagnais[edit]

Numeral[edit]

neu

  1. four

Norman[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From a variant of Old French nuef, from Latin novus, from Proto-Indo-European *néwos.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

neu m

  1. (Jersey) new

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin nodus.

Noun[edit]

neu m (oblique plural neus, nominative singular neus, nominative plural neu)

  1. knot

Descendants[edit]

  • French: nœud
  • Norman: noeud

Piedmontese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

neu m

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

Sardinian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin naevus (mole, birthmark) from earlier gnaevus. Compare Italian neo, Romanian neg.

Noun[edit]

neu

  1. mole (on skin)

Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *now- (compare Old Breton nou and Irish ).

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

neu (triggers soft mutation)

  1. or